100% dosage calculations? - page 8

I was sitting here looking at my dosage calculations book(& wondering why I decided to go to nursing school:lol2:) &I started thinking. My school requires a 100% on your dosage calculation test and... Read More

  1. by   IndyMitchell
    Quote from JBudd
    In most areas 80% is okay, but if you can't do drug calculations 100% correctly, you won't be safe passing meds. Too many threads in here about the agonies people put themselves through after med errors.

    Having several chances to prove yourself works for me though! I tutored several classmates in doing drug calcs because I'd take a LOT of math in high school and pre-reqs. They all passed first time! I failed one question from not reading carefully enough and being over confident. Got it second go round with lesson learned: slow down and do it right the first time spin::icon_roll
    :icon_rollTO BAD you wasn't here to tutor me, but I will work at it and try to get help,, any advice on how to remember or what to remember?
    tina
  2. by   JBudd
    Quote from IndyMitchell
    :icon_rollTOO BAD you weren't here to tutor me, but I will work at it and try to get help,, any advice on how to remember or what to remember?
    tina
    Oh Lordy. Now remember I did that in 1979...(ahem:sasq: me in the stone age, giving pre-op sedation).

    Keep your units in the right place: gtts/cc x cc/h x h/min=gtts/min
    which makes sure you are multiplying (or dividing) the right numbers.

    #mg/kg (drug str) x kg (pt. wt.) = mg (desired dose)

    cc/h x #cc desired = hours (time) needed

    mg/cc (drug) = dose in mgs/unk. ccs, cross multiply and solve for unk. as in:

    known mg x unk cc = cc x dose, then divide cc x dose by known mg to get to the amount needed to give


    when the units cancel out correctly you have it set up right.
  3. by   IndyMitchell
    Quote from JBudd
    Oh Lordy. Now remember I did that in 1979...(ahem:sasq: me in the stone age, giving pre-op sedation).

    Keep your units in the right place: gtts/cc x cc/h x h/min=gtts/min
    which makes sure you are multiplying (or dividing) the right numbers.

    #mg/kg (drug str) x kg (pt. wt.) = mg (desired dose)

    cc/h x #cc desired = hours (time) needed

    mg/cc (drug) = dose in mgs/unk. ccs, cross multiply and solve for unk. as in:

    known mg x unk cc = cc x dose, then divide cc x dose by known mg to get to the amount needed to give


    when the units cancel out correctly you have it set up right.
    THANK YOU, I want to make flash cards to carry, trin to figure out what import info to put on them..
    tina
  4. by   jon06
    Hello! Mam, pls help me with my dosage computation. i don't know if this is correct or wrong... Here's the problem, doctors order is 1.5 G of cefuroxime,stock dose is 750mg. So my solution is D/S x Q,
    convertion? 1.5g x 1000mg=1500mg , then 1500/750 x 10 ml =20ml

    the diluent is 10ml is that correct for adult? i'll gonna give the whole 20ml in 1 shot? is that overdose for adult or what? Sorry for me... Thank you!
  5. by   beth66335
    Quote from jon06
    Hello! Mam, pls help me with my dosage computation. I don't know if this is correct or wrong... Here's the problem, doctors order is 1.5 G of cefuroxime,stock dose is 750mg. So my solution is D/S x Q,
    conversion? 1.5g x 1000mg=1500mg , then 1500/750 x 10 ml =20ml

    The diluent is 10ml, is that correct for an adult? I'm gonna give the whole 20ml in 1 shot? Is that overdose for adult or what? Sorry for me... Thank you!
    I don't know where the 10ml comes in but, 1500mg/ 750mg is 2ml. Is the 750 diluted in 10mls? You need to figure out how many mg per ml diluted and then plug those numbers into the problem I believe. Explain this better if you can so I can see the whole picture.
  6. by   justme1972
    Quote from Coloradogrl
    I was sitting here looking at my dosage calculations book(& wondering why I decided to go to nursing school) &I started thinking. My school requires a 100% on your dosage calculation test and allows you to take 1 retake test.

    I understand why they require this but I was just wondering if most schools do this

    Because NOTHING LESS than 100% is going to be required when you start a job.

    To do anything less will not only harm a patient, but could potentially kill your patient, put you out of a job and possibly your license, depending on the size of the error.
  7. by   emmy27
    Quote from Coloradogrl
    I was sitting here looking at my dosage calculations book(& wondering why I decided to go to nursing school) &I started thinking. My school requires a 100% on your dosage calculation test and allows you to take 1 retake test.

    I understand why they require this but I was just wondering if most schools do this
    Each semester we have to pass the test before we can start clinicals; the first try each semester, 90% is passsing, if you have to retake it, you have to get 100%.

    We get theoretically unlimited tries, but since it takes several days to schedule, take, and get results from a try, and clinicals start the second week, practically speaking you have two or three tries max before you're missing clinicals and then you're in trouble.
  8. by   jon06
    Quote from beth66335
    I don't know where the 10ml comes in but, 1500mg/ 750mg is 2ml. Is the 750 diluted in 10mls? You need to figure out how many mg per ml diluted and then plug those numbers into the problem I believe. Explain this better if you can so I can see the whole picture.
    Actually,i'd just only put that diluent=10ml in my own problem solving. Because the Formula is [ D/S x Q ] ,right? My main problem is that, i don't know where to get the diluent or how many should i dilute into vial. Is there any standard measurement when it comes to diluent?

    Thank you for listening!
  9. by   beth66335
    Quote from jon06
    Actually,i'd just only put that diluent=10ml in my own problem solving. Because the Formula is [ D/S x Q ] ,right? My main problem is that, I don't know where to get the diluent or how many should I dilute into vial. Is there any standard measurement when it comes to diluent?

    Thank you for listening!
    Usually the packaging tells you how much to dilute a drug. If it is going into an IV line a drug book will tell you that, if the drug packaging doesn't. The only standard I know of is ml, how many depends on the med given. Again the addition of the dilutent information at the end of the problem, necessitates the calculation of how much medicine per ml diluted, so you can figure out what to put in the final problem to solve for dose. If the 10ml in the problem means that the medicine diluted is 750mg per 10 mls, or 75mg/ml, then the answer is 2ml...you see what I'm saying?How much dilutent contains 750mg of med?
  10. by   whiteoleander5
    We need an 80% (2 wrong), so if we get below that, we have to retake it and get a 90% or better. And if that doesnt happen, then... adios. :zzzzz
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Mine sure did it.
  12. by   beth66335
    Quote from beth66335
    Usually the packaging tells you how much to dilute a drug. If it is going into an IV line a drug book will tell you that, if the drug packaging doesn't. The only standard I know of is ml, how many depends on the med given. Again the addition of the dilutent information at the end of the problem, necessitates the calculation of how much medicine per ml diluted, so you can figure out what to put in the final problem to solve for dose. If the 10ml in the problem means that the medicine diluted is 750mg per 10 mls, or 75mg/ml, then the answer is 2ml...you see what I'm saying?How much dilutent contains 750mg of med?
    I mean 20ml...sorry!

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