Why I'm leaving nursing - page 13

Ive taken the very hard decision in my life to leave nursing. Im writing this as anonymous as I want only to be heard. I qualified as a nurse 6 years ago. I enjoyed the course and could not wait to... Read More

  1. by   Melissaharvey913
    Well said...I have 11 years and was on a mission. Nursing was natural to me so what an awesome way to make a living....so wrong .....If you want to be in this field and be happy don't expect to provide the care organizations tell you they want you to provide. Its all bullcrap. The world is all about the dollar and how to get more. Healthcare is no different and if your heart is truly in this your going to be disappointed. Nursing educators need to change the information given to prospective students. Then again universities are businesses and they want to make money..If a true nurse at heart who wants to make a difference in lives,if she hears this ..there goes addmission rates and oh yeah lost money....The world moves so fast and people want more more more well not all..there is no time for care and compassion. Keep them alive, pretend as if you don't see problems that need addressed and never go above and beyond.
    If you didn't chart it...it did not happen. That rule works in varies ways.

    In a managed care CM role, the problems are there just a bit different. I searched high low finally found a position. Great pay Monday thru FridAy 8am-5pm never work weekends or holidays it's a sin in this setting. During the interview I mAde sure that I would be able to educate,guide, and help patients live healitbier happier lives. Oh yes., I was 93rd you are going to close the care gaps help the families and make life better. Ease the companies are paid on a case basis. The more cases you sign up the more money they make. The state contracts appear to be in favor of helping members,allowing them to be healthier, and oh saving the state tax payers dollars. However you don't have ti,e to make all the different calls to doctors office and spend time on calls with patients. You spend a nice amount the first time come up with a wonderful POC interventions, goals you know the deal. Then you call once every few weeks or month to check in make some notes. Most time is spent making cold calls to try and sign up new members,your calls have time limits and you must include all the info to meet NCH not sure that's right standards to avoid fines...I am sorry to say I admire you and think your making a good decision. Hold onto your license just in case but I feel you. I am at the point I don't know what to do. Love to all my nursing sisters and brothers though. Nurses eating their young and this applies in New specIalities......makes things even worse.


    Case management especially managed care companies
    Last edit by Melissaharvey913 on Oct 20, '16
  2. by   target98765
    Well, get out or go back for an advanced degree in nursing.
  3. by   target98765
    I love my job now, I work with a great supportive team, BUT that does not erase the 20 years I spent miserable and unhappy in part due to my husband that would not pay for me to go school to change careers, nor let me quit my job. Still married but it is hard to forgive the last 20 years. AT least I love my newish job.
  4. by   Carol Ebert
    Good to know you have found something that brings you joy. Let go of past resentments and focus on your new path. As Abraham-Hicks says, your job is to feel good and if that is how you feel now, you are on the right path. Congratulations!
  5. by   icepak
    Nursing is going backwards. If housekeeping can't clean bodily fluids then why have them at all. That is absurd. I really feel it is because most nurses are women. I RARELY play the woman card but I cannot see a majority of men putting up with this abuse.
  6. by   rnfrombama
    I admire your decision to leave. I'm on the brink of leaving nursing myself. I'm going to first try other areas before my exit. However, I feel I am running out of patience and self-control. But if something non-nursing comes my way before I am able to find my nursing niche, and if it's something I think is for me and I will enjoy, I'm OUT!!! I refuse to let my job or nursing tear my life apart. I'm sick of being abused and having no rights or support and being told that comes with the territory or I signed up for this. That's not OK with me and I refuse to accept "the culture."
  7. by   Szbeylik
    About two months ago I was in the exact same place. I had the same bitter feelings. I was depressed, exhausted, burnt out and hopeless. I worked for a big private hospital, in a busy ICU. Acuity was high and it got higher over the last few years. The workload would have been manageable but the management gave us little support, constant new expectations, nonsense rules and regulations that made our work much harder than it ever had to be. Just as an example; we couldn't keep spare supplies in patient rooms, even in the locked cabinets that were installed for that reason just 2 years ago. Can't keep even saline flushes, nor could we carry it in our pockets; if we were seen with them we would be reprimanded. You were watched, criticized, talked to only if something was off, always looking for mistakes. We haven't had a staff meeting in years, no one listened to or care about our needs. The cherry on top was when they changed the charge nurse arrangement and decided to have designated charge nurses instead of rotation of the more experienced ones, which was the long standing tradition. Without first talking to the staff, one day these people who have done charge in some cases for 15 plus years just received an email, in which they were told that they are no longer going to have this role. Instead, they chose their favorites, who were more willing to kiss up to managers and more willing to throw anyone under the bus to be a favorite. One of them was a younger nurse who just started there less than a year ago. One of the nurses who had been doing charge asked the manager why she wasn't chosen. The answer was: "because you are *****-faced", whatever that was supposed to mean. She was supportive to other nurses and well liked by her peers, she had no attitude issues that I could recall. BUT even if she did... This tone is so out of line, I couldn't believe it when I heard the story. I encouraged her to report it to HR and to speak to a union rep, she just said she has children to feed and needs her job. That was the last straw for me, I needed to leave. The morale was so low, people were unhappy, scared, whispering in groups, tired, disgruntled, everyone kept talking about wanting to leave. I had enough. I was so depressed working there, I seriously considered leaving nursing all together. I heard similar stories from my friends working in different hospitals. I saw no way out. Then I decided to give it one more try and I applied and got hired to a smaller rural hospital, where the pace is much slower, people are relaxed and happy, workload is manageable, and what I do is appreciated and respected. I have time to be with my patients, I can pamper them and see the person in them, like a nurse should. I enjoy nursing now. I noticed that the overall company attitude is different, not just the pace. I've only been there about a month, so things can change, but right now I am so happy I made the leap. Unfortunately, I don't think that this is the way out for most of us. This job was unique and most nursing jobs are located in big hospitals. But... there is some hope out there. Don't stay in a place where you are unhappy. Yes it's a tough decision and change IS stressful... but not nearly as stressful as staying in a place where you are abused and disrespected. CHANGE.
  8. by   BeenThere2012
    Quote from Szbeylik
    About two months ago I was in the exact same place. I had the same bitter feelings. I was depressed, exhausted, burnt out and hopeless. I worked for a big private hospital, in a busy ICU. Acuity was high and it got higher over the last few years. The workload would have been manageable but the management gave us little support, constant new expectations, nonsense rules and regulations that made our work much harder than it ever had to be. Just as an example; we couldn't keep spare supplies in patient rooms, even in the locked cabinets that were installed for that reason just 2 years ago. Can't keep even saline flushes, nor could we carry it in our pockets; if we were seen with them we would be reprimanded. You were watched, criticized, talked to only if something was off, always looking for mistakes. We haven't had a staff meeting in years, no one listened to or care about our needs. The cherry on top was when they changed the charge nurse arrangement and decided to have designated charge nurses instead of rotation of the more experienced ones, which was the long standing tradition. Without first talking to the staff, one day these people who have done charge in some cases for 15 plus years just received an email, in which they were told that they are no longer going to have this role. Instead, they chose their favorites, who were more willing to kiss up to managers and more willing to throw anyone under the bus to be a favorite. One of them was a younger nurse who just started there less than a year ago. One of the nurses who had been doing charge asked the manager why she wasn't chosen. The answer was: "because you are *****-faced", whatever that was supposed to mean. She was supportive to other nurses and well liked by her peers, she had no attitude issues that I could recall. BUT even if she did... This tone is so out of line, I couldn't believe it when I heard the story. I encouraged her to report it to HR and to speak to a union rep, she just said she has children to feed and needs her job. That was the last straw for me, I needed to leave. The morale was so low, people were unhappy, scared, whispering in groups, tired, disgruntled, everyone kept talking about wanting to leave. I had enough. I was so depressed working there, I seriously considered leaving nursing all together. I heard similar stories from my friends working in different hospitals. I saw no way out. Then I decided to give it one more try and I applied and got hired to a smaller rural hospital, where the pace is much slower, people are relaxed and happy, workload is manageable, and what I do is appreciated and respected. I have time to be with my patients, I can pamper them and see the person in them, like a nurse should. I enjoy nursing now. I noticed that the overall company attitude is different, not just the pace. I've only been there about a month, so things can change, but right now I am so happy I made the leap. Unfortunately, I don't think that this is the way out for most of us. This job was unique and most nursing jobs are located in big hospitals. But... there is some hope out there. Don't stay in a place where you are unhappy. Yes it's a tough decision and change IS stressful... but not nearly as stressful as staying in a place where you are abused and disrespected. CHANGE.
    I've worked in several units that had very similar issues like the ones you stated in your "old" position. It is very disheartening. Congratulations on landing what sounds to be, a great new place to work. That is how it used to be. ICU nurses don't mind complex, high acuity patients. Many thrive on those, but it simply cannot be done safely when the "corporate" bottom line comes first. I'm so tired of hearing these stories....People...our patients...deserve so much better and sadly they have no clue how all this works and we nurses are not in the position to explain this to them. All they and their families see is the lack of care and time given to them, and they often blame it on the nurse....the same person who would only love to be able to care for them better.
  9. by   silasozzie
    jeeez, try 30 years!!!! and yes! I am absolutely sick of all the politics, bullying and backstabbing. I have another 6.5 years until I retire......
  10. by   Sandier
    I've loved this profession so much that i dont know what else to do other than to be a nurse.
    I have also felt that nursing has changed overtime, and like you, I was terribly exhausted, disappointed and saddened by the fact that people around (esp. the management and even other healthcare workers) make me feel that "well, you are JUST a nurse". Nurses in the Middle East have been treated very lowly. I am one of them.

    I have mustered a lot of strength to leave the only work I have known. It was very painful decision as I remember how I poured out my heart into nursing as a student eager to qualify and be part of a team that saves lives, how I battled to get through a full day at school after countless sleepless nights, how I learned to play deaf due to daily verbal abuse, how I cried with the family of their loss and grief.... After a decade of practice, I bade a bittersweet goodbye to nursing.
  11. by   Szbeylik
    Sad to hear your story. What do you do now?
  12. by   ~Plumeria~
    I admire you for making the wise decision to leave - while you can. I've waited 17 years to leave and now find myself perhaps too old to re-train and in an area of the US with few job opportunities. I cried after every shift my first 6 months of nursing. I wish I had left then.

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