Why do Nurse's wear there degree on there name badges? - page 19

I have never had anyone give me a straight answear to this question, Why do nurses wear there degree on the badge uniforms? I see few other people in the hospital setting that do it except for... Read More

  1. by   RN-ing
    Quote from hotflashion
    I agree with what liberalrn said back in 2003: "badges should stipulate LPN, CNA, RN, Supervisor, whatever the position is....the massive alphabet soup out there confuses me..."

    The abbreviations mean nothing to patients: Nothing, nada, zip. They also do not understand CNA or PCT or whatever abbreviation fits your institution's job title for that position.

    One hospital where I did a clinical started issuing nurses badges without last names. I think it would help more if nurses were accountable to their patients by being identifiable by FIRST AND LAST names. As nurses we know quite a lot about our patients. I think they deserve to at least know our names.

    Agree with you about the abbreviations; however, last names on badges is a safety issue. Google yourself sometime and see what comes up. Sometimes you can get an address or even a phone number. Most places refrain from last names because we sometimes take care of prisoners, but I ask you this, can patient visitors be social deviants that have not yet been caught? And also, have you ever been stalked? I have and it is a total violation of your personal life.

    Your patient will be just fine if they don't know your last name.
  2. by   BanoraWhite
    At my old facility we had RN and PCA (personal Care Attendent) on our badges. It was for our staff, residents and families of residents so they knew who they should be directing a question to, and who should be providing what care (for example an agency nurse could see whether a PCA was giving drugs when they weren't supposed to, or a PCA could locate a RN to ask specific questions).
  3. by   emtb2rn
    I'd like to have my badge read:

    emtb2rn RN ROTFLMAO

    but my boss won't let me.....
  4. by   theatredork
    Quote from emtb2rn
    I'd like to have my badge read:

    emtb2rn RN ROTFLMAO

    but my boss won't let me.....


    SondheimGeek, RN, LOLLERCOPTER Pilot
  5. by   hotflashion
    Quote from nursbrooklyn
    ...last names on badges is a safety issue. Google yourself sometime and see what comes up. Sometimes you can get an address or even a phone number. Most places refrain from last names because we sometimes take care of prisoners, but I ask you this, can patient visitors be social deviants that have not yet been caught? And also, have you ever been stalked? I have and it is a total violation of your personal life. Your patient will be just fine if they don't know your last name.
    I disagree that stalking is a safety issue, for nurses. Can you point me to any research that indicates otherwise? I think this is just a paranoia tinged over-reaction in our society.

    It is possible that I still live, mentally, back in those good old innocent olden tymes and don't fully appreciate the dangers of this brave new world. Doctors go by their first and last names, and I think most other health professionals do. I prefer to trust people and treat them with respect and deal with whatever consequences may arise. For me, providing my first and last name is professional behavior. You say the patient will be just fine but I don't agree. I think it shows a lack of respect to hide one's identity.

    I have Googled myself and not much comes up; my town, yes, but not my address and not my phone number. I take what I consider to be reasonable precautions when I enter the public space that is the Internet. Just like I don't go posting my name and number on phone poles or public bulletin boards (though I might at my local supermarket) I also don't give this information out willy nilly online. I don't include it on Amazon reviews I may write or any other public forum. I don't have a landline phone in my name so I don't come up in any online directories, but my husband regularly checks and has his listing removed. There are only 3 people in the country (and maybe the world) with my last name, so I'm easy to find that way, if you can spell it correctly.

    I could be surrounded by social deviants! They aren't marked, so how do you know who is and who isn't?
  6. by   RN-ing
    Quote from hotflashion
    I disagree that stalking is a safety issue, for nurses. Can you point me to any research that indicates otherwise? I think this is just a paranoia tinged over-reaction in our society.

    It is possible that I still live, mentally, back in those good old innocent olden tymes and don't fully appreciate the dangers of this brave new world. Doctors go by their first and last names, and I think most other health professionals do. I prefer to trust people and treat them with respect and deal with whatever consequences may arise. For me, providing my first and last name is professional behavior. You say the patient will be just fine but I don't agree. I think it shows a lack of respect to hide one's identity.

    I have Googled myself and not much comes up; my town, yes, but not my address and not my phone number. I take what I consider to be reasonable precautions when I enter the public space that is the Internet. Just like I don't go posting my name and number on phone poles or public bulletin boards (though I might at my local supermarket) I also don't give this information out willy nilly online. I don't include it on Amazon reviews I may write or any other public forum. I don't have a landline phone in my name so I don't come up in any online directories, but my husband regularly checks and has his listing removed. There are only 3 people in the country (and maybe the world) with my last name, so I'm easy to find that way, if you can spell it correctly.

    I could be surrounded by social deviants! They aren't marked, so how do you know who is and who isn't?

    My point was this...why is it not okay (according to upper management at my facility) to put my first and last name on the board if my pt is a prisoner, but its okay to do it with other patients? And I'm not really concerned about patients, more about their visitors because we have adopted a 24/7 anyone and everyone visitation policy that has brought some questionable people out of the woodwork and into my workplace.

    I'm being paranoid because of my past and that will never change, sorry 'bout it!

    P.S. I treat all of my patients with respect, despite whether I tell them my real name or that I'm Patsy Cline. If they ask, and I'm comfortable, I will tell them and it won't affect the care I give them (sorry, no research to support that, just personal experience).
  7. by   hotflashion
    Quote from nursbrooklyn
    My point was this...why is it not okay (according to upper management at my facility) to put my first and last name on the board if my pt is a prisoner, but its okay to do it with other patients? And I'm not really concerned about patients, more about their visitors because we have adopted a 24/7 anyone and everyone visitation policy that has brought some questionable people out of the woodwork and into my workplace.

    I'm being paranoid because of my past and that will never change, sorry 'bout it!

    P.S. I treat all of my patients with respect, despite whether I tell them my real name or that I'm Patsy Cline. If they ask, and I'm comfortable, I will tell them and it won't affect the care I give them (sorry, no research to support that, just personal experience).
    I should have said I was sorry that you'd been stalked, had to go through what must've been a terrifying experience. Were you stalked by someone with whom you had contact as a nurse?

    Maybe your hospital shouldn't have a board; mine doesn't. It sounds like it's visible to the public? If it is, it shouldn't be.

    I've had bad experiences too, but. I almost always find hope in hearing about other people's experiences, because it helps me to understand the wider world and not just my (possibly unfortunate) corner of it. Research also does this, for me, anyway. After I wrote that response I did some looking around for research on stalking and health care professionals, because if I am ever (please, please, please) employed as a nurse, I will be annoyed if my employer requires that I leave my last name off my badge unless they can give me some hard facts about how risky it is.

    I wasn't saying that you, specifically, were paranoid. Maybe you are; and maybe there's good reason to be. For me that "good reason" must be larger than the experience of one or two or three people. And for me, it's still important to be who I am in public.
  8. by   BabyLady
    I do NOT agree with removing the last name from name badges, period.

    At our hospital, when taking care of a prisoner, you hand your badge to the guard outside the door before you go in...so they don't know your first or last name.

    As far as everyone else, if we are going to call ourselves licensed professionals, then we need to act like licensed professionals.

    You don't see physicians hiding their hame...and they make decisions that kill people.

    You don't see lawyers hiding their name...and a bad case can send someone to prison.

    You don't see police officers hiding their name...because the law states you have the right to know their name.

    You don't see judges hiding their name....can you imagine how many enemies they have?

    What what makes US think that we are special????? Just because most of us are women.

    Sorry, but you aren't going to find research to back it up that would support hiding your name.

    The public has the right to know who is treating them...and to do anything less than full transparency, is just flat-out paranoia that is 100% unjustified.

    And before someone makes the claim, "Oh, well, we have to leave at night".....so what...so does a lot of other professions. If you get "attacked" in a parking lot it probably has more to do with the fact that it's what can happen to women in dark parking lots rather than having your last name on your badge.
  9. by   traveler85
    For me it is a matter of pride, not arrogance. I worked darn hard for that degree, and to be able to put it on my tag is like wearing my badge of honor. Also, since I look pretty young for my age (I'm 24 and once had a patient ask me if I was old enough to be giving him his medication), it allows my patients to see that I have been through the schooling, and yes, am old enough, to give them good care.
  10. by   ItsTheDude
    it's an ego thing, a nurse is a nurse (diploma, adn, bsn). not many people outside of nursing or health care have a clue what an adn or bsn is, but they might know what a rn is, heck many people don't know there's a difference between a lpn and rn.
  11. by   RN-ing
    Quote from BabyLady
    I do NOT agree with removing the last name from name badges, period.

    At our hospital, when taking care of a prisoner, you hand your badge to the guard outside the door before you go in...so they don't know your first or last name.

    As far as everyone else, if we are going to call ourselves licensed professionals, then we need to act like licensed professionals.

    You don't see physicians hiding their hame...and they make decisions that kill people.

    You don't see lawyers hiding their name...and a bad case can send someone to prison.

    You don't see police officers hiding their name...because the law states you have the right to know their name.

    You don't see judges hiding their name....can you imagine how many enemies they have?

    What what makes US think that we are special????? Just because most of us are women.

    Sorry, but you aren't going to find research to back it up that would support hiding your name.

    The public has the right to know who is treating them...and to do anything less than full transparency, is just flat-out paranoia that is 100% unjustified.

    And before someone makes the claim, "Oh, well, we have to leave at night".....so what...so does a lot of other professions. If you get "attacked" in a parking lot it probably has more to do with the fact that it's what can happen to women in dark parking lots rather than having your last name on your badge.
    I think any research on that topic would be quite unethical!
  12. by   RN-ing
    Quote from hotflashion
    I should have said I was sorry that you'd been stalked, had to go through what must've been a terrifying experience. Were you stalked by someone with whom you had contact as a nurse?

    Maybe your hospital shouldn't have a board; mine doesn't. It sounds like it's visible to the public? If it is, it shouldn't be.

    I've had bad experiences too, but. I almost always find hope in hearing about other people's experiences, because it helps me to understand the wider world and not just my (possibly unfortunate) corner of it. Research also does this, for me, anyway. After I wrote that response I did some looking around for research on stalking and health care professionals, because if I am ever (please, please, please) employed as a nurse, I will be annoyed if my employer requires that I leave my last name off my badge unless they can give me some hard facts about how risky it is.

    I wasn't saying that you, specifically, were paranoid. Maybe you are; and maybe there's good reason to be. For me that "good reason" must be larger than the experience of one or two or three people. And for me, it's still important to be who I am in public.

    I was not stalked as a nurse, I was much younger and it was very scary. I admit I am paranoid. There has been an incident recently at work where a nurse was been threatened by family members, and this kind of thing happens every now and then (different families respond differently to stress!). I just think it was bad timing for our hospital to initiate this new "policy".

    I feel I must reiterate that my profesionalism as a nurse is in no way affected by whether or not I give my last name.

    Thanks for writing back...
  13. by   hotflashion
    Quote from nursbrooklyn
    I think any research on that topic would be quite unethical!
    I'm not sure what topic you mean. There is research on stalking, quite a lot of it. The US Department of Justice is very interested in stalking: http://www.ovw.usdoj.gov/aboutstalking.htm

    It's harder to find information about stalking of healthcare professionals; there's some, but I'm looking for more. I'm going to take this discussion to a more appropriate thread.

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Why do Nurse's wear there degree on there name badges?