Why Do I Care? - page 10

by Ruby Vee 21,606 Views | 109 Comments

Why do I care that new nurses leave our unit after less than two years -- often after less than one year? Why do I care, when they're adults. They're going to have to live with the consequences of being out of work, or having a... Read More


  1. 7
    Quote from pookyp
    Being a senior nurse makes you an expert nurse? Serious question.
    No, but it's more likely than a new nurse being an expert.
    Fiona59, LadyFree28, llg, and 4 others like this.
  2. 8
    Quote from pookyp
    Being a senior nurse makes you an expert nurse? Serious question.
    Being a senior nurse means you've at least had the time to become an expert. Some take better advantage of the opportunity than others.
  3. 3
    I get you Ruby Vee. I only spent 3 years in ICU, before I couldn't take working nights any more, and couldn't see hope of moving to days in the near future. (And I regret leaving the bedside, I miss it a lot.)
    But with new staff you have no one to watch your back if you have a patient crashing. With new staff you are up a creek if there is a code, or two codes. New staff may not be organized enough to be there to help you turn and clean a patient. New staff may miss subltle signs of decompensation and not intervene until it is too late, so you feel like you are watching the whole floor. You are ALWAYS the resource person - you don't have others with experience to bounce stuff off of - hey, tell me what you think is going on with this patient, or, I can't figure this out...
    Where I work the SICU and CVICU are CRNA wanna-be destinations, with high turnover. The MICU has a more stable staff, with a lot of COBs. Because you can't go to CRNA school if you work the MICU.
    OCNRN63, Ruby Vee, and Fiona59 like this.
  4. 2
    Quote from LadyFree28
    It is the fact they want money WITHOUT the work; everybody knows that we are NOT in this business for free.
    I'm not aware of it being a "fact" that "they" want money without work. What a generalization! Where is your evidence?
    wannabecnl and Not_A_Hat_Person like this.
  5. 2
    Quote from 07302003
    I get you Ruby Vee. I only spent 3 years in ICU, before I couldn't take working nights any more, and couldn't see hope of moving to days in the near future. (And I regret leaving the bedside, I miss it a lot.)
    But with new staff you have no one to watch your back if you have a patient crashing. With new staff you are up a creek if there is a code, or two codes. New staff may not be organized enough to be there to help you turn and clean a patient. New staff may miss subltle signs of decompensation and not intervene until it is too late, so you feel like you are watching the whole floor. You are ALWAYS the resource person - you don't have others with experience to bounce stuff off of - hey, tell me what you think is going on with this patient, or, I can't figure this out...
    Where I work the SICU and CVICU are CRNA wanna-be destinations, with high turnover. The MICU has a more stable staff, with a lot of COBs. Because you can't go to CRNA school if you work the MICU.
    Thank you! The newbies often want to judge us for not helping them enough or for "not being very nice to me, but nobody is too busy to be polite!". But they don't understand what it's like to be the sole experienced nurse on the night shift in a 20 bed unit!
    LadyFree28 and OCNRN63 like this.
  6. 1
    Quote from 07302003
    Where I work the SICU and CVICU are CRNA wanna-be destinations, with high turnover. The MICU has a more stable staff, with a lot of COBs. Because you can't go to CRNA school if you work the MICU.
    I don't understand what all these CRNA students will do, assuming they graduate and become CRNA's. But it sounds like in the meantime, it's not just ICU that's the glamour job, but specifically SICU and CVICU? It's such a hierarchy. My outpatient world must be at the bottom...except for NPs.
    OCNRN63 likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from 07302003
    I get you Ruby Vee. I only spent 3 years in ICU, before I couldn't take working nights any more, and couldn't see hope of moving to days in the near future. (And I regret leaving the bedside, I miss it a lot.) But with new staff you have no one to watch your back if you have a patient crashing. With new staff you are up a creek if there is a code, or two codes. New staff may not be organized enough to be there to help you turn and clean a patient. New staff may miss subltle signs of decompensation and not intervene until it is too late, so you feel like you are watching the whole floor. You are ALWAYS the resource person - you don't have others with experience to bounce stuff off of - hey, tell me what you think is going on with this patient, or, I can't figure this out... Where I work the SICU and CVICU are CRNA wanna-be destinations, with high turnover. The MICU has a more stable staff, with a lot of COBs. Because you can't go to CRNA school if you work the MICU.
    Several MICU applicants get into school. Not all applicants are SICU and CVICU. Some are even PICU and NICU.
  8. 5
    Quote from kungpoopanda
    I'm not aware of it being a "fact" that "they" want money without work. What a generalization! Where is your evidence?
    I'm basing my evidence of almost 14 YEARS of potential and actual cohorts, and even nursing instructors, and some peers that I worked alongside, some I had to precept; when you hear "my worth" thrown about since July 2000 or as long as I have in this business; then come back with your own EBP; this is NOT a new phenomenon. Thanks.
    Last edit by LadyFree28 on Feb 8
  9. 1
    It was a lot easier to get a job in the specialty you wanted 10 years ago. People now are desperate and take whatever job they can which sometimes results in them not liking it/looking for a new job shortly after being hired.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
  10. 1
    Job hopping as a resume issue does not hurt certified nurses with credentials (e.g. certifications) and experience in the high-demand specialties. I met a very young CCU nurse who is in her early to mid 20s who has already changed units like 6 times and you can bet if she asks for a new position again she will get it.

    Employers don't think in term of what's righteous or honorable, they think in terms of stealing qualified professionals from their competitors.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.


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