What is your biggest nursing pet peeve?? - page 21

Nurses that are brilliant but do not know the difference between contraindication and contradiction!!!!!!!:rotfl: :rotfl:... Read More

  1. by   rosemadder
    Quote from rn500
    I work midnights - my biggest pet peeve is that many of the day nurses don't seem to realize that at 7am we want to GO HOME - immediately if not sooner!! Before they get report they think it is okay to stand around and chit chat about what their kids did last night, get some coffee, show pictures of the baby... It's sad that most of these nurses started out on nights and know what it's like. And it's not just my present hospital, it's been like that everywhere I've worked. Burns my butt!!!
    PM nurses who either leave or allow their assistants to leave catheters, dressing changes, insulins, etc for the am shift because they either don't want to wake their patient or just don't want to do it If an order is given at 2400 --don't pass it on to the next day's shift--totally nonprofessional and rude. Also, pm nurses who don't call the docs when a problem comes up during the night and expects the day shift to call him first thing in the morning....and pm nurses who fool around giving report when the am nurse has to get going as quickly as possible since the bulk of the meds, drsgs, procedures, doctors visits with new orders, etc will happen in the am.
  2. by   silvermaple2rpn
    My biggest peeve is working short staffed! Since I work mostly weekend shifts it seems that there is always someone either calling in sick or just not showing up at all. This drives me crazy and it just frustrates and stresses the entire team. We have 32 patients on our floor and missing just 1 staff makes a huge difference.
  3. by   teeituptom
    Quote from silvermaple2rpn
    My biggest peeve is working short staffed! Since I work mostly weekend shifts it seems that there is always someone either calling in sick or just not showing up at all. This drives me crazy and it just frustrates and stresses the entire team. We have 32 patients on our floor and missing just 1 staff makes a huge difference.

    Welcome to the wonderfull world of nursing
  4. by   Nitengale326
    ONE of my pet peeves comes from Supervisor's or team leaders. When a staff member is legitimately (?sp... it's 4 am give me a break...lol)) ill and has to take 2-3 days off. You call in and all you hear are grumbles and complaining. As a team leader, they should know who the chronic call ins are and who the rarely call ins are. If they don't ASK THE STAFF... WE ALL KNOW WHO FAKES IT! I have been at my place for nearly a year and recently had to call in for 4 days (per physician orders) and they had a cow each and every night I called in. Not once did I hear, "hope you feel better", "Anything we can do?" What happened to compassion. Yeah, this really makes me want to kick in and help when others (legitimate or otherwise) call in or want to take a vacation!
  5. by   teeituptom
    Quote from Nitengale326
    ONE of my pet peeves comes from Supervisor's or team leaders. When a staff member is legitimately (?sp... it's 4 am give me a break...lol)) ill and has to take 2-3 days off. You call in and all you hear are grumbles and complaining. As a team leader, they should know who the chronic call ins are and who the rarely call ins are. If they don't ASK THE STAFF... WE ALL KNOW WHO FAKES IT! I have been at my place for nearly a year and recently had to call in for 4 days (per physician orders) and they had a cow each and every night I called in. Not once did I hear, "hope you feel better", "Anything we can do?" What happened to compassion. Yeah, this really makes me want to kick in and help when others (legitimate or otherwise) call in or want to take a vacation!
    When the weather is good
    And Im feeling restless
    I have called in to go Golfing

    Call it a Mental Health Day
  6. by   kar212
    My pet peeve is when patients and visitors expect you to be their waitress and want you to fetch various food items for them from the kitchen.
  7. by   leslie :-D
    sometimes i think my standards are ridiculously high so when someone doesn't perform to my level of expectations, i am totally intolerant.
  8. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from rosemadder
    PM nurses who either leave or allow their assistants to leave catheters, dressing changes, insulins, etc for the am shift because they either don't want to wake their patient or just don't want to do it If an order is given at 2400 --don't pass it on to the next day's shift--totally nonprofessional and rude. Also, pm nurses who don't call the docs when a problem comes up during the night and expects the day shift to call him first thing in the morning....and pm nurses who fool around giving report when the am nurse has to get going as quickly as possible since the bulk of the meds, drsgs, procedures, doctors visits with new orders, etc will happen in the am.
    I don't generally see night nurses 'fooling around' at shift change...as we're tired and ready to go.

    Night shift tends not to call docs for nonermergent things, part of the night nurses' role is to decide what can wait. I have family members who demand to speak to doctors at 2 am and I give them the office number for the next day: I do NOT call my doctors for nonermergent things at night period. If its a major problem that's a whole 'nuther ballgame.

    I generally offer to place a doc call at 7 am for nonpanic abnormal labs, etc, but we will still get the oncall doc who likely won't know the patient anyway: so day shift will frequently defer to rounds. We have a communication sheet in docs progress notes where I can leave them messages too.

    Also if the patient refuses to be woke it is their right, IMO, and this happens. I wouldn't want my meds, bath, dressings, IV's changed at 2 am either. I try hard to get my patients long periods of uninterrupted sleep at night so they can heal: and combine labwork, xrays and vitals to minimize interruptions.

    Shift workers frequently lose perspective and its easy to 'blame' the other shift.
  9. by   teeituptom
    good ole shift warring continues evermore
  10. by   etmx5313
    Nurse is in room changing out TPN solution, flushing line, etc. CNA comes in room and tells nurse that "Room X needs some morphine." Nurse states, "I can get it here in about 15-20 minutes. I can't just stop this and do it, so please tell Mr. XXX that I can get his wife some morphine after I am finished. If he would like, the LPN can give it IM (res. has PICC line) Approximately 2 minutes later, Mr. XXX enters room where nurse is changing TPN and says, "XXX needs morphine." I wanted to slap him. Literally. I said, "Excuse me, but I am in the middle of a procedure that I cannot simply stop. If you feel XXX is unable to wait for me to finish, the LPN can give her morphine IM. Now please leave the room! GRRRRR Common sense.
  11. by   nursemjb
    Quote from etmx5313
    Nurse is in room changing out TPN solution, flushing line, etc. CNA comes in room and tells nurse that "Room X needs some morphine." Nurse states, "I can get it here in about 15-20 minutes. I can't just stop this and do it, so please tell Mr. XXX that I can get his wife some morphine after I am finished. If he would like, the LPN can give it IM (res. has PICC line) Approximately 2 minutes later, Mr. XXX enters room where nurse is changing TPN and says, "XXX needs morphine." I wanted to slap him. Literally. I said, "Excuse me, but I am in the middle of a procedure that I cannot simply stop. If you feel XXX is unable to wait for me to finish, the LPN can give her morphine IM. Now please leave the room! GRRRRR Common sense.
    Yes, and I don't like the fact that healthcare professionals are supposed to be perfect, while other professions don't have to be perfect. We aren't allowed to be regular imperfect humans, no way that would be possible.
  12. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Nurses as patients, or their spouses as patients (NOT meaning everyone), who start the i'm-a-nurse-and-i-know-what-the-deal-is. Threatening to call the doctor personally for another prescription (yeah i DARE you to do that...).
  13. by   jaimealmostRN
    Quote from LPN2Be2004
    Nurses as patients, or their spouses as patients (NOT meaning everyone), who start the i'm-a-nurse-and-i-know-what-the-deal-is. Threatening to call the doctor personally for another prescription (yeah i DARE you to do that...).
    I had to do this about 9 months ago...one of my family members (previous drug issues, learning disablities, etc) went to a very small ED with a pretty bad reputation with a lump in her neck, vomiting, nausea, anorexia for one week. This 2nd yr resident saw her and said something like, "lets just keep our eye on it for a while..." I got a tearful call from her in the waiting room and immediatly made the 1hr trip up there... When I got there I asked to speak with attending AND resident immediatly, in the presense of my family member, got very angry at lack of care/concern on part of MD (nurses were great, never been rude to your own either!)...she got her CT scan 30min later, and a nuclear imaging test about 2hrs later. Turns out CA... but oncologist (at a different hosp!) says 60-70% chance SINCE WE CAUGHT IT EARLY. I have never been so angry in my life than I was at that resident and I'm GLAD I was her advocate.

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