What Is The Deal With All The Highly Educated & Professionals Becoming RNs? - page 22

by PMFB-RN 32,494 Views | 255 Comments

So I pretty much always have nursing students with me. I have senior BSN students who are doing a critical care class (six 12 hours shifts), ADN students from 2 different programs doing their preceptorships (eight 12 hour... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from wish_me_luck
    Prof, I clarified that I am speaking about the people who had past professional careers that go back to school for nursing and say "I am doing what I really wanted to do to begin with." Not the stay at home moms or people who for whatever circumstantial reason they couldn't.
    No need to clarify or defend yourself. I was generalizing, and my post (intentionally) went way beyond what you stated.
  2. 0
    Quote from hope3456

    I don't see why people can't get an ADN - start working - and then while they are working get into an online school and earn the BSN. That way they can pay as they go, and be gaining clinical knowledge to go with the book learning. They could make an agreement with their employer to earn the BSN within a specified period of time.
    That is, IF the hospital is willing to take them on without the BSN. not all institutions are anymore.
  3. 0
    Quote from BrandonLPN

    My point was if one goes around telling people (I was thinking interviews in particular) that they're a nurse because it's their calling and they only do it because they're such caring, giving individuals, the people they're telling this to won't take them seriously.
    I understood your point completely. And I wasn't arguing it. Just adding more perspective.

    Edited to add: I'm a big believer in needing more than a big heart. You can have all the passion in the world to want to help people and be a nurse, and you just may not have what it takes. I was reminded of this when I saw Monsters University. I don't want to give it away, but for those who have seen it, you'll know what I mean
    Last edit by ProfRN4 on Jun 23, '13
  4. 0
    Just met a solidly experienced nurse who had been laid-off and couldn't catch an interview for over a year. Just got a job, albeit no where near what was had before. Now the spouse who is a nurse just got canned. Different hospital employers. It's not 2007, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 ... it's 2013 and the future was supposed to be looking brighter.

    Careful kiddos. If nursing is all you got on your resume, finding a job will be dicey if nursing isn't cutting it. People don't want nurses in anything but nursing and when that's not there, things get really scary for nurses.
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    I haven't read all 22 pages of this. I think the original point, the transition of more highly educated professionals into Nursing, is good for Nursing. I'm pleased to see the trend and I hope it continues. In the long run I think it will help coax Nursing, culturally speaking, into the white collar world. Look at it from the perspective of who socializes with whom outside of the workplace. Nursing does not socialize with providers very often and I think since a lot of power is derived from non-workplace relationships, Nursing has suffered for that. As the average nurse becomes more educated, with backgrounds such as described in the beginnings of this thread, those individuals are more likely to find themselves in social situations with administrators, their physician colleagues, persons on the board of directors, philanthropists in the community, etc. As those relationships are strenghtened, Nursing will gradually gain more parity within the group. It presents interesting opportunities.
    myelin, besaangel, Benedina, and 1 other like this.
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    What you're describing will also simply increase costs on an already severely overburdened system.
    Esme12 likes this.
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    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    I haven't read all 22 pages of this. I think the original point, the transition of more highly educated professionals into Nursing, is good for Nursing. I'm pleased to see the trend and I hope it continues. In the long run I think it will help coax Nursing, culturally speaking, into the white collar world. Look at it from the perspective of who socializes with whom outside of the workplace. Nursing does not socialize with providers very often and I think since a lot of power is derived from non-workplace relationships, Nursing has suffered for that. As the average nurse becomes more educated, with backgrounds such as described in the beginnings of this thread, those individuals are more likely to find themselves in social situations with administrators, their physician colleagues, persons on the board of directors, philanthropists in the community, etc. As those relationships are strenghtened, Nursing will gradually gain more parity within the group. It presents interesting opportunities.

    *** Maybe. I am more skeptical. I also am not seeing the potential benefits of socializing with physicians and administrators. If you don't please expand on this. If you are right what would be the cost? In my view the cost would be a lack of diversity that the current education paths bring to nursing.
    nursel56 and JeanettePNP like this.
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    Why should nursing go to BSN-only, increasing the costs to nurses, hospitals, and health care consumers so that nurses get invited to cocktail parties with physicians? Seems a tad extreme to me.

    Now, not to attribute anything to anyone in particular, but often the same people who advocate BSN only are the first to try to eliminate PCTs and CNAs from the health care setting. In other words, more education and "professionalism" to shovel more poop. I have no problem with cleaning up poo, but I do think there's a disconnect there.
    Esme12 and PMFB-RN like this.
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    Quote from VANurse2010
    Why should nursing go to BSN-only, increasing the costs to nurses, hospitals, and health care consumers so that nurses get invited to cocktail parties with physicians? .
    There are many reasons to advocate for a BSN-entry, if you can see any of them then you have blinders on. There are a myriad benefits of BSN entry. There are also some concerns, most notably cost and diversity.

    I suspect BlueDevil was speaking to the role of education in ensuring the nursing as a profession has the educational background to maintain (or further) their spot at the table in healthcare.

    Do the pros outweigh the cons? In my option they do, but I can see the valid argument.
    Altra likes this.
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    I understand the benefits perfectly well - I just don't agree with you about BSN-exclusive entry, particularly with respect to the bedside.
    Esme12 likes this.


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