What are some common concerns with geriatric patients? - page 2

I am doing some research and wondered what the most common concerns are when dealing with geriatric patients? Illnesses, complaints, etc. I know Alzheimer's and psychiatric problems would be a... Read More

  1. by   Twright49015
    Hi
    Another answer or information for you in regards to geriatric nursing. How about the loss of dignity and independence from being placed in a nursing home or adult foster care home, leading to depression.
    Just think most of these people have lived in their own homes most of their lives, then suddenly due to a fall or a family or Dr. opionion they can no longer manage everyday common things on their own; ie: dressing, feeding themselves, toileting...... they now have to rely on others to assist them with these tasks.

    Theresa:uhoh21:
  2. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from Twright49015
    Hi
    Another answer or information for you in regards to geriatric nursing. How about the loss of dignity and independence from being placed in a nursing home or adult foster care home, leading to depression.
    Just think most of these people have lived in their own homes most of their lives, then suddenly due to a fall or a family or Dr. opionion they can no longer manage everyday common things on their own; ie: dressing, feeding themselves, toileting...... they now have to rely on others to assist them with these tasks.

    Theresa:uhoh21:
    there you go theresa. that is another reason why dignity, honor, and autonomy are crucial...recognize their losses in function, independence, families and cognition. as with us i feel safe to say that ending up in a nursing home is one of our worst nightmares in aging. it is so up to us to make it a loving, embracing home with skilled and compassionate nursing care.
  3. by   Energizer Bunny
    Thank you both. This is why I was sooo interested in Dr. Thomas Perls and his studies on centenarians. He truly loves the elderly and treats them as they should be. Someone in the audience asked him about why there are not any geriatricians in our area.....sad, but true. So these older people with all of their problems and concerns are left to deal with GP's who may or may not give two hoots.

    Geriatrics is obviously not where I am planning on ending up but I find it very fascinating thanks to Dr. Perls.
  4. by   longtermcarern
    Quote from CNM2B
    Both, really. I'm looking for resources on the net too if you have any. I guess what I want to find out is if there are any specific illnesses, etc. that are mostly found in this population and not in the younger ones. KWIM?

    Have you looked at this site www.eldercare.com ?
  5. by   nurseygrrl
    I just had a great inservice on geriatric care in the LTC setting. The instructor said that other than the physical things that go on with the elderly, the most important thing to remember is that the elderly want so much to feel that they are still a contributing member of society. It's always great if you can involve them in something where they are helping others. On the geriatric floor of my LTC facility, the residents do many things such as make dessert for the evening meal, paint each other's nails, fold laundry, match socks, sew things for each other, plant gardens around the facility (we have tall planting boxes for those in wheelchairs), one woman knits lanyards for her fellow residents to keep their locked drawer keys on. The residents LOVE it! They also make bears and blankets and little caps for less fortunate babies and donate them. They love to 'help' and it's really great for everyone. When I worked on the 3rd floor in my LTC, I had one resident who always liked to sit by the desk. I gave her the job of answering the phone and calling for the person that the call was for. Another resident answered the call bells on the phone at the desk for me and then told me what the pt. needed. It was a great system. I would bring them in little treats at the end of the week for helping me.
  6. by   Energizer Bunny
    You guys are so great! Thanks...this would be a great discussion for all of us.
  7. by   jnette
    Quote from HerEyes73
    I just had a great inservice on geriatric care in the LTC setting. The instructor said that other than the physical things that go on with the elderly, the most important thing to remember is that the elderly want so much to feel that they are still a contributing member of society. It's always great if you can involve them in something where they are helping others. On the geriatric floor of my LTC facility, the residents do many things such as make dessert for the evening meal, paint each other's nails, fold laundry, match socks, sew things for each other, plant gardens around the facility (we have tall planting boxes for those in wheelchairs), one woman knits lanyards for her fellow residents to keep their locked drawer keys on. The residents LOVE it! They also make bears and blankets and little caps for less fortunate babies and donate them. They love to 'help' and it's really great for everyone. When I worked on the 3rd floor in my LTC, I had one resident who always liked to sit by the desk. I gave her the job of answering the phone and calling for the person that the call was for. Another resident answered the call bells on the phone at the desk for me and then told me what the pt. needed. It was a great system. I would bring them in little treats at the end of the week for helping me.
    Lovely.... just lovely. So very true that they still so want to CONTRIBUTE and not, as Earle said, be treated as little children.

close