Weight nurses required to lift?

  1. 0
    Does anyone know how much weight a nurse is required to be able to lift? I know nurses have to be able to lift patients. Also in psych facilities nurses and mental health workers have to restrain patients.
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  3. 16 Comments so far...

  4. 6
    Things have changed as far as nursing. This is the last career that weight restrictions have been addressed in.

    Hospitals are expected to provide lift devices and you are expected to use them and protect yourself. So, it might be around 50 lbs on job description. But you are protected as far as lifting - FINALLY. Just another area where nurses were expected to be superhumans.

    I was on a lift committee on my last job. You will find that most people don't take advantage of the lift devices. Especially us ole' timers who lived without them. I have destroyed my back and neck on the job and I push to protect your back. Especially entering the field. I am 46 and can't see me making it to retirement. Protect your back, you are finally allowed to do it after so many of us have screwed ours up.

    You have to protect yourself because your employer won't.
    Sandy_dfw, Dolce, Apollorn, and 3 others like this.
  5. 0
    Quote from BrokenRNheart
    Things have changed as far as nursing. This is the last career that weight restrictions have been addressed in.

    Hospitals are expected to provide lift devices and you are expected to use them and protect yourself. So, it might be around 50 lbs on job description. But you are protected as far as lifting - FINALLY. Just another area where nurses were expected to be superhumans.

    I was on a lift committee on my last job. You will find that most people don't take advantage of the lift devices. Especially us ole' timers who lived without them. I have destroyed my back and neck on the job and I push to protect your back. Especially entering the field. I am 46 and can't see me making it to retirement. Protect your back, you are finally allowed to do it after so many of us have screwed ours up.

    You have to protect yourself because your employer won't.
    I agree. I think many nurses when a patient falls, we assume 2 people should be enough, when maybe 3 or more may be needed. I know someone that got hurt like that and had to quit nursing for another career. And as you stated, using a lift, to help lift a very heavy patient. One facility I know has a 100 pound lift requirement, but I doubt it is enforced since some of the new hirees seem so frail.
  6. 1
    Ours is simply a 'no-risk-lift' policy. We are expected to use lifting devices at all times, or else we aren't covered by insurance. Yet sometimes this is impractical. For example, using Jordan frames with patients in traction. Or trying to catch someone that loses their balance. Or moving someone up the bed, which you know you are quite capable of doing with someone else, but the hospital wants you to use a 'slippery sam'; the latter often takes longer.

    I wish we could use some lifts on lighter patients. I was always a fan of the shoulder lift.
    psychnurse1998 likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from nyapa
    Ours is simply a 'no-risk-lift' policy. We are expected to use lifting devices at all times, or else we aren't covered by insurance. Yet sometimes this is impractical. For example, using Jordan frames with patients in traction. Or trying to catch someone that loses their balance. Or moving someone up the bed, which you know you are quite capable of doing with someone else, but the hospital wants you to use a 'slippery sam'; the latter often takes longer.

    I wish we could use some lifts on lighter patients. I was always a fan of the shoulder lift.
    Great points..I had not thought about the risks a lighter patient can also pose. I hadnt heard of a slippery Sam.
  8. 1
    A slippery sam is a piece of slippery cloth, often sail material, that can be folded in half, rolled under the patient, and be used to move them without causing friction to the patient's skin, or damage to the nurses back, as there is no lifting involved (generally!)
    psychnurse1998 likes this.
  9. 1
    My job description says that I need to be able to lift up to 60 lbs. by myself.

    There is no such thing as "light duty" unless at the discretion of the unit manager. One unit manager refuses work to anyone on light duty and has been known to use the "no light duty" to get rid of people. Another accommodates them.

    We now have a no-lift policy and I insist on availing myself of all the latest gadgets to lift patients. The policy protects everyone -- me, the patient, and the hospital. Plus, I'm in my mid-50's and I refuse deal with any pains that I don't have to.
    psychnurse1998 likes this.
  10. 1
    Where I work it's 80 lbs. But at the same time we now have lift equipment and if you don't use it and hurt your back you are on your own. I'm not allowed to lift more than 20 lbs. due to having a coronary artery stent placed but they let me work on the floor with that restriction and of course being a nurse I've lifted more than I should have
    psychnurse1998 likes this.
  11. 2
    The no lift policy really is a joke at my work because there are some things that you simply have to lift. We have to lift genesis trays, instrument trays etc. lift patients arms and legs when they are being prepped, we have to lift patients into all sorts of positions, lift legs into stirrups, lift heavy equipment. And of course the spinal and jackson table requires lifting to be done.

    I'm concerned i have done something to my back. Everytime i have a day where there is loads of manual handling no matter what i do, (i bend the knees etc) i go home with a sore lower back and shooting pains down my legs.
    psychnurse1998 and nyapa like this.
  12. 0
    Quote from Scrubby
    The no lift policy really is a joke at my work because there are some things that you simply have to lift. We have to lift genesis trays, instrument trays etc. lift patients arms and legs when they are being prepped, we have to lift patients into all sorts of positions, lift legs into stirrups, lift heavy equipment. And of course the spinal and jackson table requires lifting to be done.

    I'm concerned i have done something to my back. Everytime i have a day where there is loads of manual handling no matter what i do, (i bend the knees etc) i go home with a sore lower back and shooting pains down my legs.
    My point exactly. Its all weighted in favour of the hospital and insurance companies...
    Back pain is not funny (((scrubby)))


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