Use of Prisoners in Drug Trials - page 3

Is it ethical? Do they really have informed consent? This two page article reviews some history, and argues pros and cons:... Read More

  1. by   Otessa
    I was suggesting that the IRB(where you work) could give uninformed people information regarding research subjects so that they would become informed. I have no information about prisons and if they have an IRB.
  2. by   mercyteapot
    IRB regulations aren't exclusive to hospitals. I work for a university and have to go through the process to assess whether the simplest of surveys constitutes research and whether the participants are considered human subjects all the time. There is nothing inherently wrong with using prisoners for drug trials, assuming they're afforded the same protections as anyone else.
  3. by   LeahJet
    Maybe I am slow this AM, but the WWII reference.....
    Comparing murderers and rapists to a persecuted race??

    Sorry if I am on a different page, just clarifying.
  4. by   traumaRUs
    My reference to WWII was to the Nazi concentration camps and Dr. Mengele who performed experiments on the prisoners there. The common feeling was that the prisoners had no rights, had committed "crimes" and therefore were felt to be less than human.

    I should have made myself more clear - sorry.
  5. by   LeahJet
    Quote from traumaRUs
    My reference to WWII was to the Nazi concentration camps and Dr. Mengele who performed experiments on the prisoners there. The common feeling was that the prisoners had no rights, had committed "crimes" and therefore were felt to be less than human.

    I should have made myself more clear - sorry.
    'Prisoners' in concentration camps from Nazi Germany and prisoners in our system that have been tried and convicted of crimes are not comparable.

    One is our Justice system and the other is Genocide.
  6. by   JHUBRAIN
    Quote from Otessa
    I was suggesting that the IRB(where you work) could give uninformed people information regarding research subjects so that they would become informed. I have no information about prisons and if they have an IRB.
    The job of an IRB is to protect the study particpants no matter were they are (even in prison). Most IRB study presentation paperwork has a part on it about "special populations" and prison inmates fall into that. I don't think any IRB would allow study particpants to be used against their will (even prision inmates-no mattter what they did) Just a thought
  7. by   indigo girl
    [color="darkslategray"]it's the iom that is suggesting this, i hadn't realized what agency it was:

    u.s. government wants to begin using prisoners for medical experiments
    Last edit by indigo girl on Dec 1, '06

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