The Healthcare Bubble and How to Survive It - page 2

The answer: the healthcare bubble. What it is and how to survive the "pop." Is there a healthcare bubble? The experts waffle, but facts are facts; between 1999 and 2011, government spending on... Read More

  1. Visit  Rose_Queen profile page
    5
    Quote from mclennan
    The bubble won't truly pop until nursing salaries take a nose dive. So, so many of us are overpaid, sorry but it's true. These organizations could just arbitrarily decide to cut nursing wages in half if they wanted to, and what would we do?
    If my salary were to be cut in half, I'd go work at McDonalds or Walmart. Half the salary is definitely not worth the liability and the amount of work. Sometimes I wonder if the salary is worth it now.
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  3. Visit  SummitRN profile page
    2
    Quote from mclennan
    The bubble won't truly pop until nursing salaries take a nose dive. So, so many of us are overpaid, sorry but it's true. These organizations could just arbitrarily decide to cut nursing wages in half if they wanted to, and what would we do?
    I think nurses are paid what the market will bear. I don't think most are overpaid. If my salary took a nose dive, I'd go back to IT. If it was cut in half, I'd make more as a ski patroller or ambulance EMT, jobs that are regarded as massively underpaid and only require 3 months of trade school.

    New grads start around $22/hr around here. That is already so low that some people go back to their previous careers or don't go in at all. You think that people would go through nursing school and work as a nurse for an $11/hr job?

    The market simply wouldn't bear it. Nobody will undertake 2 or 4 years of schooling to earn the same pay as 3 months or less.
    Last edit by SummitRN on Oct 25, '12
    multi10 and sweetnurse786 like this.
  4. Visit  tnmarie profile page
    1
    Just some random comments on the article and comments so far:

    1. I agree that a lot of the problem stems from presenting the medical profession as "inflation proof". "They will always need nurses", you hear people chant at you over and over again. I live in a factory town where most of the factories have closed. We just lost one last year that employed 70% of the county residents. Our nursing classes are FILLED with displaced factory workers who buy in to the hype and are understandably just looking for some job security. The increase in students has lead to increase in number of nursing classes and we have 5 schools in a very small geographic location EACH turning out 2 classes/year. My town has one small hospital, 3 LTCs and about 5 home health/private duty offices and that is about the average for all the towns in my area.

    2. Just because people will always need healthcare does not mean they will be able to afford it. I can only imagine the people not getting propper care because they are having to choose between health care and feeding their family. People not being able to afford health care = lower census = nursing hours being drastically cut and/or nurses being laid off. It's bad for EVERYONE! I have been underemployed or unemployed since getting my LPN five years ago (I currently get 12-24 hrs/week if I'm lucky) and I had several years of previous experience as a mlitary medic before getting my LPN.

    3. I agree that there is a possibility that nursing salaries will be slashed and more nursing jobs (especially LPN jobs) will go to UAPs. I'm already seeing that trend where I live as far as UAPs go, which is one of the main reasons I'm in RN school (I'm also seeing LPNs getting traditional RN jobs such as MDS coordinators, skilled nurses, and admission coordinators here so that they don't have to pay RN salaries for those positions).
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
  5. Visit  laughing weasel profile page
    0
    If my wages got cut in half I would go back to security or bench tech. I love nursing but will not be responsible for some ones life for 14.00 an hour. Health care is expensive because of demand people are dyeing to get it. The problem in the industry is that a large amount of people do default 1/4-1/3 in some areas. It is very difficult to run a business with that kind of payment schedule.
  6. Visit  multi10 profile page
    1
    Have you been to London? The subway system there costs at least 4 times what the NYC subway system costs, I mentioned this to a Brit in London one night in a pub.

    He sniffed and said, "Well. Perhaps the tube is overpriced. But perhaps your subway is underpriced. ...would you like a drink?"
    siRNita likes this.


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