Strike or time to grow up! - page 3

I hear so much talk about striking that it scares me to think that there are so many people who would abandon their patients so easily. Maybe in some cases where safety is an issue I could consider... Read More

  1. by   -jt
    As a new nurse the military will not allow me to work in a speciaized area until I have 1 year nursing experience.


    same thing applies in many hospitals not in the military. and that is how it should be -as a new nurse, you have much to learn.
    when you talked about working a 12 hr shift, going to the airport, coming back to work another 12 hr shift, did you mean you hadnt slept at all in between all that?
  2. by   JenKatt
    jt- I think so (did he not sleep at all) because according to him he's super nurse
  3. by   -jt
    (did he not sleep at all)

    well according to recent studies, the effects of lack of sleep are similar to the effects of etoh intoxication. More mistakes are made from lack of sleep & more accidents occur from lack of sleep than from intoxication. Someone may think they are super-nurse for working so much, but it is irresponsible & unprofessional for a nurse to be putting her pts in an unsafe, hazardous situation - with the nurse being the hazard... It is also against the Nurse Practice Act to not prevent the pt from being in harm's way. A nurse who has had no sleep in a whole day cannot function optimally & can be harmful, thus violating that standard. An RN could lose her license for that.
  4. by   majic65
    Not that it matters but in my first 9 months as a nurse, I was working as charge in a huge intercity L&D with about 250 deliveries a month. Most of our patients had serious medical problems as well as pregnancy--so I don't remember ever sitting around for 6 hours. And I was way too busy actually NURSING to be getting all those initials after my name.
    P.S. I have never been involved in a strike, but let me tell you, if I ever return to hospital nursing and the issue arises, I will be a part of it.
    Are you bored with REAL nurses yet, J???
  5. by   JenKatt
    Let me just say this. I am in awe of most of the nurses on this bored. Ya'll have been there, done it and conquered. Kudos for still stadning at the end of all of it.
  6. by   Hardknox
    Anybody check out Jared's website? His cartoons about "nurses" says it all.....
  7. by   -jt
    Kudos for still stadning at the end of all of it.

    thanks but really we had no choice. If we fell - who would be there to care for us?
    We are all we've got!
  8. by   pickledpepperRN
    Although I have never been on strike I will if necessary in order to protect the patients.
    I did once walk a picket line with striking friends from another hospital. The registered nurses had helped transfer the patients to another hospital in the chain (They had 1 day "rolling strikes).
    A car pulled up with a lady in labor who had not gotten the word to go to another hospital. One L&D RN left the picket line, helped with the delivery, gave report to her manager, and returned to the picket.

    PS: To the military nurse. I haven't just been on the line I have sixty-two thousand hours of staff nursing. It is getting harder and harder with more and more patients who are sicker than ever. You see, I work in critical care where we literally keep people alive who would have died just a few years ago.
  9. by   fergus51
    [quote]Originally posted by kennedyj:
    <STRONG>
    Originally posted by majic65:
    [qb]In my 9 months as a nurse I have been off to a good start (not just academically). What have you done? Strike??
    [ June 19, 2001: Message edited by: kennedyj ]</STRONG>
    Do you really think that's fair? I think it's awesome that you are a good nurse and studying so much to improve upon yourself, but striking is not the evil you want it to be. I don't think you understand the sacrifice that a nurse has to go through to strike. Even more sacrifice involved than giving up time to study. We haven't had a strike here in decades, but I know nurses who were forced to strike and had to get other jobs on top of it to support their families.

    Nurses strike for their patients (because conditions are really bad, you'll find out if you come back) and for their own families (a nurse should make enough money to suport herself and her family). The average age for nurses is going up and your country is luring our new nurses away by the thousands, so what would you have us do? I am honestly asking. What should we do? Accept a contract that eliminates designated days off for part-timers, allows calling in of casuals to no longer be based on seniority (new nurses are a lot cheaper) and make the highest paid nurses accept 22$ an hour? How many nurses do you think we'll be left with after the mass exodus to the US? We don't offer any of the signing bonuses, tuition reimbursement or retention bonuses you do and even after 30 years, nurses here make about 18$ an hour. How can we compete?

    I am at the end of my rope Jared. I am tired of caring for more patients than it is safe to care for. I am tired of working OT (we have an OT ban in place, but I work L&D and postpartum so I haven't been affected by it). I am tired of making 16$ an hour after getting a four year degree (the minimum is the BSN here now) and a year long course to be able to work L&D. I am sick of knowing that my employer and the public does not value my contribution. I am at the point where I am seriously considerig moving to the US even though I know that will just make the situation here worse. This is how far I have been pushed by my employer.

    So I ask again, what is the alternative to striking? Our job action doesn't seem to be getting the point across.
  10. by   kennedyj
    Originally posted by -jt:
    <STRONG>As a new nurse the military will not allow me to work in a speciaized area until I have 1 year nursing experience.


    same thing applies in many hospitals not in the military. and that is how it should be -as a new nurse, you have much to learn.
    when you talked about working a 12 hr shift, going to the airport, coming back to work another 12 hr shift, did you mean you hadnt slept at all in between all that?</STRONG>

    Well I had a long flight from Germany to las Vegas to sleep. With 2 days of classes. then a long flight back. so plenty of time to sleep.

    Jared
  11. by   kennedyj
    Originally posted by JenKatt:
    <STRONG>jt- I think so (did he not sleep at all) because according to him he's super nurse </STRONG>
    I hardly think I'm super nurse. There are many nurses out there with far more knowledge than me...By far. There are some of the Labor and Delivery nurses that I work with that astound me with the excellent way they deliver care, their knowledge, and their skill. I think there is something we can learn from every nurse out there. I think I'm a little ambitious and probably just excited with what I can discover in nursing. It is one of the few fields that offers such unlimited possibilities. You can just about do anything you want.

    Sometimes the querreling, back biting, cannibilism (eating the young) gets in the way of what can be good teamwork and cohesion. So many people want to be an individual and exceed beyond others. Does it really matter? In the long run do we feel better about ourselves? Do we get a pay raise?

    [ June 20, 2001: Message edited by: kennedyj ]
  12. by   kennedyj
    Originally posted by Hardknox:
    <STRONG>Anybody check out Jared's website? His cartoons about "nurses" says it all.....</STRONG>
    LOL
    Jared
  13. by   kennedyj
    thanks but really we had no choice. If we fell - who would be there to care for us?
    We are all we've got![/QB][/QUOTE]

    good point
    J

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Strike or time to grow up!