specialty air mattresses

  1. 0
    I had an RN student shadowing me today. We put an air mattress, I believe it is called a prime air mattress one side is plastic and one side has material on it and it goes home with the patient and they can air it up with a hair dryer or bicycle tire pump, on the bed and I started to put the linens on. He told me that they were taught that when using an air mattress you don't put linens on the bed. I haven't ever heard of that has anyone else???

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  2. 9 Comments...

  3. 0
    I have seen some specialty air mattresses (usually on people with stage IV's) that you are not supposed to put any linens on. Usually they are beds that are rented by facilities for people who are on the verge of dying from said wounds. From what you described, that is not one of those mattresses. Also we use low air pressure mattresses and work and they always have linens on them
  4. 0
    We sometimes use what we call an air bed. Sounds similar to this.
    We are also told not to put linens on it as it disrubts the air flow or something like that. We usually end up putting a sheet on but not tucking it in, because it is impossible to move a pt without having a sheet to use!
  5. 0
    I've seen the beds with no linens. They kind of gross me out, and I can't imagine them being very comfortable with no sheets.

    Our hospital is changing out ALL our beds to be specialty mattresses (one floor ata time). Our wound care specialist says we will still have to turn the patients q2h, so I'm not sure why they bothered.
  6. 1
    Depends on why the mattress is being used. To prevent wound healing or pressure ulcers you need air to get to the patient. So little or no linen. To move obese or pts who need assistance, linen won't make a difference.

    BTW, we have nurses who still think that if one pad under a pt is good then 3-4 is better. They bunch up and the pt. gets sores due to the linen!
    catshowlady likes this.
  7. 0
    Critically ill patients who recover often say the bed is reminiscent of the womb. It's very comforting and the lack of linen does not seem to bother them and perhaps helps keep otherwise uncomfortable patients comfortable. Also, in contrast to the pain that a lot of obesity sufferers go through during sleep, this is a dream. The bed is ultra comfortable and missed once they are transferred to normal beds!

    Nina
  8. 1
    Only the beds with air flow or a pump that circulates the air would be one of those type of beds that should get minimal sheets. Remember the Clinitron beds...those have alot of air flow.

    Some air mattress overlays we just use flat sheets on them so the fitted don't compress the air.
    HmarieD likes this.
  9. 0
    You should always use linens with an air mattress. Linens can be more readily changed out than the cover on a low air loss mattress and a true low air loss mattress' air flow will not be impeded by standard linens. Also, most good low air loss mattresses will have top covers that are moisture barriers, but allow air to flow. If pads are required, you should use the appropriate size, and only one.

    No air mattress will replace the need for a patient to be turned. There are a lot of great resources for wound care information on REPUTABLE medical sites that can answer the most common questions that come up. If you are in doubt, contact the manufacturer or your supplier for answers, that is what they are there for!!
  10. 0
    Quote from vashtee
    I've seen the beds with no linens. They kind of gross me out, and I can't imagine them being very comfortable with no sheets.

    Our hospital is changing out ALL our beds to be specialty mattresses (one floor ata time). Our wound care specialist says we will still have to turn the patients q2h, so I'm not sure why they bothered.

    The beds are great for reducing pressure ulcers, but patients still must be turned to promote circulation, respiratory function, etc. One of the companies that sets these beds up in our area (in the pt's home) has been telling caregivers that there's no reason to turn the pts, and it's really hard for us to then convince them otherwise.
  11. 0
    Yeh, i was taught you can put linen on it but not tuck it in
    As for turns, they are turned, but less frequently than they would be. Turns are determined by when the pts skin is showing signs of marking etc.
    Last edit by scared'o'needles! on Feb 11, '10


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