Specialization after Graduation??? - page 3

Hello everyone! I am posting this question and poll for a group nursing project. We are just a few months away from graduating and this information would be very helpful for us. You... Read More

  1. by   luckymichelle
    Hi all -

    I have another question to add to this poll.... Is it possible for a new RN student to go right into a clinical setting after graduation? Do all new nursing grads need that hospital experience?

    Michelle
  2. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I can only speak for myself here; Using someone's name in response to a post is never meant as an attack, but as a reference to the post (for clarification), with which one has issue. I try not to use bandwidth reprinting each post to which I refer.

    We have seen several differing viewpoints here, as expected. Some SWEAR by med-surg experience prior to "specialization" ; others say it was fine w/o doing their stint in med/surg areas. I think you wouldl find if 5000 people responded here, the percentages would be roughly the same. Each viewpoint is valuable and useful here. That said, I still believe...

    I would NOT do med-surg cause your instructors and/or others tell you to. YOU have to lay out your career path. It makes sense to lay a foundation in med-surg for some. For OB, it did not matter for me. I did fine.

    It's up to the individual. You learn a lot about what you can do/want to do in clinical rotations. Med-surg is very valuable as a baseline for many other areas, but I still say, it's a speciality in and of itself, if you become any good at it. It's not just a stepping-stone to "higher" callings, you know. Ask any med-surg nurse if I am not being truthful here.

    Fergus, love your Die-jox-in example, had me laughing out loud. Perfect example that we all can forget what we don't use.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Feb 16, '04
  3. by   Catma63
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    I would NOT do med-surg cause your instructors and/or others tell you to. YOU have to lay out your career path. It makes sense to lay a foundation in med-surg for some. For OB, it did not matter for me. I did fine.
    I hear ya. Thing is, I wouldn't do med-surg simply because my instructors and/or others tell me to but rather, because I agree with them that med-surg for a year would be the best route for a beginning nurse to take. I look at it this way: These are seasoned nurses. My instructor has been a nurse for almost 30 years. The head instructor has been a nurse even longer. One of the clinical instructors has been a nurse for 42 years. All of these nurses hold their BSN. My main instructor holds her BSN/MSN. The head instructor has her BSN, MSN, and APRN. Now, going by their education level PLUS the fact that they've been nurses for such a long time, I'm akin to thinking that they're going to know a heck of a lot more (as to what unit is best to start working in) than a new or recently graduated nurse (and of course, I don't mean anyone here...I've no idea how long some of you have been graduated) and certainly more than a nursing student. How could I not respect that they know enough not to steer me (or others) wrong in their advice?
    Last edit by Catma63 on Feb 16, '04
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from Catma63
    I hear ya. Thing is, I wouldn't do med-surg simply because my instructors and/or others tell me to but rather, because I agree with them that med-surg for a year would be the best route for a beginning nurse to take. I look at it this way: These are seasoned nurses. My instructor has been a nurse for almost 30 years. The head instructor has been a nurse even longer. One of the clinical instructors has been a nurse for 42 years. All of these nurses hold their BSN. My main instructor holds her BSN/MSN. The head instructor has her BSN, MSN, and APRN. Now, going by their education level PLUS the fact that they've been nurses for such a long time, I'm akin to thinking that they're going to know a heck of a lot more (as to what unit is best to start working in) than a new or recently graduated nurse (and of course, I don't mean anyone here...I've no idea how long some of you have been graduated) and certainly more than a nursing student. How could I not respect that they know enough not to steer me (or others) wrong in their advice?

    Now, no one here is trying to steer you wrong, including your instructors or posters at these boards. As for your instructors, I dont' argue with their backgrounds and/or education. But YOU KNOW YOU better than they do. That is all I am saying. The more education they get does NOT mean they know the right career paths for all of their grads. Ihd several instructors discourage my taking my OB job right out of school ...but I figured there was a real reason the manager called and interviewed me 3 mo before i even graduated. And OB was why I went into nursing; it was my goal to be an OB nurse.

    Instructors know much more than I do in theory...and their backgrounds may be much more varied than mine. I would never take that away from them.
    But, the more time they spend away from bedside/active practice, the further the gap between this and their educational pursuits can become. Just know we who are responding here, are practicing NOW in the world, and while I may not have an MSN/ARNP, PhD, does NOT mean I don't have a really GOOD insight to what is going on out here!

    Whatever you decide, best wishes.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Feb 16, '04
  5. by   Catma63
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    I dont' argue with their backgrounds and/or education. But YOU KNOW YOU better than they do. That is all I am saying. the more education they get does NOT mean they know the right career paths for their grads. And the more time they spend away from bedside/active practice, the further the gap between this and their educational pursuits can become. Just know we are practicing NOW in the world, and while I may not have an MSN/ARNP, PhD, does NOT mean I don't have a really GOOD insight to what is going on out here!

    Whatever you decide, best wishes.
    Yeah, I DO know me more than anyone else does. I suppose it's knowing that I've still so much to learn in the arena of critical thinking for all diseases and illnesses that their point to work med-surg for a year makes sense to me. Like I said in my original, it would provide the chance to hone my skills, improve my confidence in those skills, etc.
    Thanks for the best wishes!
    Last edit by Catma63 on Feb 16, '04
  6. by   fergus51
    I think that's the only kind of new grad who should do med surg (the one that actually wants to). I would feel sorry for the floor if new nurses hated it and were just sticking it out for six months.

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