Snow emergency excuse? - pg.6 | allnurses

Snow emergency excuse? - page 8

so, here in nyc, we're expecting a big one this weekend. my friend is working tomorrow night, and is anticipating a problem getting in to work already (they're saying it's going to be at it's worst... Read More

  1. Visit  z's playa profile page
    0
    Quote from DeniseRNBSN
    When all three hurricanes hit here in Florida 6 months ago we were expected to pack a bag and come in to work. Not one person complained.

    We are a level 1 trauma center and we had patients flying from other hospitals to ours because the smaller hospitals were closing their doors.

    I believe that we an Nurses owe it to our patients to be there for them whether it be rain/sleet/snow/hail/tornadoes/hurricanes/earthquakes.

    Denise RN, BSN, CCRN

    Well said.

    Isn't that when we could be needed the most?
  2. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    0
    Quote from heart queen
    last winter i worked 75 minutes away, here in ny, by the lake we get snow, snow, snow!!! there were many mornings i had to get up at 330am to snow blow my driveway to get out and give myself enough time to get there at 7am. then i get to work to find that the locals couldn't do it... while i had been "plowing" through 3 feet in places (before the plows were out)! now, that got old real quick and in the spring i did change to something closer.

    but you can't live in ny where it snows and not know it's your responsibility to get up early, dig yourself out and have plenty of time to drive in at a very safe and slow speed and have an overnight bag ready in your car because ya just never know when the snow won't stop falling

    now, those that are dealing with ice storms.... forget it !!! if you're at work... you're stuck until the clean up crews make it safe.... hence the overnight bag!!!!

    right now i'm sure some administrative idiot is telling an employee to brave the ice and get in. sure i will when i can put blades on my tires and skate in

    i lived and worked in wisconsin for years -- always made it to work in the snow, even if i was 90 miles away at my parents' house the night before. but you're right -- i'd drive 90 miles to work in a snowstorm only to find out that the folks who lived within walking distance didn't even bother to try. :angryfire if you live where it snows, you'd better figure out how to get to work in the snow, because it's your responsibility. i have to have a tad bit of sympathy for the administrative supervisors who take the call-ins and know that so-and-so lives a half mile from the hospital and "can't make it in." i can understand why they're suggesting you "skate in."

    while i've never actually skated to work, i have cross country skiied in more than once!
  3. Visit  mackrn profile page
    0
    Quote from dolphinRN
    The ones that call in are the ones that live within 5 miles of the hospital.
    Although don't have snow emergencies here in Savannah, last year we were on hurricane alert multiple times. We have teams that alternate being in the hospital for alerts so no one person is supposed to get stuck with being at the hospital for extended periods. The only persons in my area were nurses with families that had to be with them during the alert so the single staf were stuck there.
  4. Visit  SusanJean profile page
    0
    Quote from luvrn
    I am wondering what the single parents did when they work 7-3p, storm comes in, and they mandated you to stay, no family in area, child in daycare that will close, how have you handled that??? Daycare isn't staying open, you don't know anybody.....and manager doesn't care its not her problem....
    You have to get to know people in your area, plain and simple. I have a spouse, but he is in the medical field and not available either, so I've found other "medical families" (as I call them) that we have made emergency plans with. Over the years it has worked out to, if someone calls needing a child/children watched, the answer is yes, no questions asked. No one (fortunately) has ever abused the system and our families have seen each other through many types of major and minor disasters. (We have no family in this area, one family has a large extended family, but choses our little "medical family" due to the "no questions" policy.)
    If you have no family, I encourage you to build your own support system.
  5. Visit  SophieMae profile page
    0
    Quote from bonemarrowrn
    so, here in nyc, we're expecting a big one this weekend. my friend is working tomorrow night, and is anticipating a problem getting in to work already (they're saying it's going to be at it's worst during her commute in).

    so here's my beef: although she is my good friend, she lives 35 miles from work, as do many of the others (some live further than that). i, on the other hand, live about 5 miles away. every winter, i hear about how these people can't get to work because of the snow, or their mother, father, husband or dog will not let them drive in the snow to work. am i the only one who feels that we, as health care professionals, have an obligation to get to work?? and also, isn't this something you need to consider when you decide to take a job that is so far from your home?? now, i'm talking about nyc/long island, where there is a hospital every 5 miles, not the boon docks (where some of you may be). and i'm also not talking about a school nurse job or a doctor's office, where no one would be there anyway if the weather is bad. it's a hospital, where sick people are, and will stay, until they get better.

    i just can't bear to listen to the complaining anymore, especially when i don't agree with their rationale. i can get into an accident on my way in, too. i can't not say anything (i'm just not that type), so i know i'm not going to be popular when i get into work tonight. speaking of tonight, i'm working overnight. so my friend calls me up and says "they might start holding people over before it snows, so you might have to stay". my shift ends at 8 am, and the snow is supposed to begin in the afternoon. i can't imagine that they would hold the entire night shift over in anticipation for a storm.
    i worked in a hospital that did not/does not allow anyone to miss b/c of storms. we had a devastating ice storm in the ne, hubby's chain saw'd their wives to work. if you can not make it to work, they will send security for you, if security can not make it to your house you are excused from work. during this ice storm, we lived without electric for days, some for weeks, but only one was unable to make it to work. the hospital did provide scrubs and a place to stay but since i only lived 35 steps from the hospital door, i did not need the assistance.
    i think your friend is thinking this is like school.........whoopee, a snow day! some one should share the fact, this is real life, co-workers are ready to be relieved and the ill, injured and dying are waiting. just how dedicated is this person?
  6. Visit  boulergirl profile page
    0
    We recently had an icestorm here in Georgia. It was anticipated to happen overnight, so those on morning shift, including kitchen staff, were offered the option of sleeping at work overnight. We had a vacant retirement apt. available with air beds, washer and dryer, bathrooms, tolietries and a TV and DVD player. Not bad accomodations!
    Well, several of them declined and decided instead to try the roads in the morning. Surprise surprise! They called in. The maintenance director was screaming at them on the phone because they were clearly warned about the weather and encouraged to come to work early. Then they were told that if they valued their jobs, they would find a way to work. One of those who tried to call in ended up in the ditch with a flat tire. (She was unhurt.)
    I'm just thankful that I already had to work 11-7, although I had failed to bring a change of clothes or tolietries. Thankfully my co-workers who stayed over had provisions. It was an interesting two days, and I learned how to walk on ice using a bedsheet (otherwise I would have broken my neck).
  7. Visit  fab4fan profile page
    0
    I don't mind staying if the weather is bad, but the hospital should make some accommodations for staff.

    I remember being mandated to stay during a bad snowstorm. The hospital let us sleep on the floor in a conference room...no pillows, no blankets, nothing. That really cheesed me off.

    I won't try to kill myself to get to work if there's bad ice...sorry, but no job is worth losing your life (or killing someone else in an accident).
  8. Visit  kat911 profile page
    0
    Quote from fab4fan
    I don't mind staying if the weather is bad, but the hospital should make some accommodations for staff.

    I remember being mandated to stay during a bad snowstorm. The hospital let us sleep on the floor in a conference room...no pillows, no blankets, nothing. That really cheesed me off.

    I won't try to kill myself to get to work if there's bad ice...sorry, but no job is worth losing your life (or killing someone else in an accident).
    Man I would have been out scrounging for stretcher pads and anything else to lay down on. Our hospital doesn't need to do this much, not much snow in Texas usually, but we do allow staff to take over unused patient rooms, especially the deluxe rooms that have a hide a bed sofa. The more the merrier.
  9. Visit  BadBird profile page
    0
    I always attempt to get to work, I only missed one shift in the 8 yrs due to ice and me sliding off the road and getting stuck in a ditch, I did make it in 6 hrs. later after being towed out of the ditch and the roads finally being salted. You just have to leave early, drive slow and don't follow too closely. Now if the roads are covered in ice then no one is safe so I would rather stay at work than try to drive home.
  10. Visit  PediRN profile page
    0
    I manage a unit in the northeast and do not accept snow as an excuse to call out sick. With current technology, we know at least three days in advance that there's a snowstorm coming. Gives you plenty of time to plan to come in early or stay with a coworker who lives close by. I live 40 miles from my job. If I can make it in, so can the majority of my staff.
  11. Visit  SweetieRN profile page
    0
    Quote from nurse educate
    so, here in nyc, we're expecting a big one this weekend. my friend is working tomorrow night, and is anticipating a problem getting in to work already (they're saying it's going to be at it's worst during her commute in).

    so here's my beef: although she is my good friend, she lives 35 miles from work, as do many of the others (some live further than that). i, on the other hand, live about 5 miles away. every winter, i hear about how these people can't get to work because of the snow, or their mother, father, husband or dog will not let them drive in the snow to work. am i the only one who feels that we, as health care professionals, have an obligation to get to work?? and also, isn't this something you need to consider when you decide to take a job that is so far from your home?? now, i'm talking about nyc/long island, where there is a hospital every 5 miles, not the boon docks (where some of you may be). and i'm also not talking about a school nurse job or a doctor's office, where no one would be there anyway if the weather is bad. it's a hospital, where sick people are, and will stay, until they get better.

    i just can't bear to listen to the complaining anymore, especially when i don't agree with their rationale. i can get into an accident on my way in, too. i can't not say anything (i'm just not that type), so i know i'm not going to be popular when i get into work tonight. speaking of tonight, i'm working overnight. so my friend calls me up and says "they might start holding people over before it snows, so you might have to stay". my shift ends at 8 am, and the snow is supposed to begin in the afternoon. i can't imagine that they would hold the entire night shift over in anticipation for a storm.
    i live 13 miles from my hospital. this weekend we had an ice storm. roads were pretty bad. it took me sunday morning (i work night shift) 45 minutes to travel 13 miles. the roads were bad enought that the highway patrol was "escorting" vehicles so that they would not travel faster than 30 mph. so - if i lived 35 miles from my job it would take me a considerable amount of time to travel on very slick and hazardous roads. i'm sorry, but my personal safety and my responsibility to my family is more important than my job. i do agree however that you should be prepared for any weather or natural disaster by carrying an overnight bag in the trunk of your car in case you are stranded and have to stay at the hospital because no one can get out or come in.
    Last edit by SweetieRN on Feb 19, '06
  12. Visit  mom23RN profile page
    0
    Well, this actually happened to me. We're in rural Michigan and we had a snowstorm about 5 years ago that dropped I think it was almost 30 inches. We lived about 5 miles from the nearest "kept open" road. I had to call in for 3 days because they never even got anywhere near us with a plow truck. On the second day work called and said that they would have someone come out and get me with a 4 X 4. I informed him that they would have to bring a snowmobile in the back of it for at least the last 3 miles by that time. I had a 4 X 4 and there was no way we were getting anywhere even in that.

    At our hospital they were actually going and getting people on snowmobiles that were in ambulances stuck on the freeway. In one section of expressway there were over 75 cars stuck.

    Sometimes it just happens. I didn't mean not to be able to get there, but it does happen.


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