Should RNs do housekeeping job or is it our job? - page 4

:angryfire Wanted to ask if anyone experienced similar situation and how the issue was handled. 1st of all let me mention that I work for a huge hospital that is considered to be one of the top... Read More

  1. by   Dixiedi
    A lot of large hospitals now have a housekeeping "division" that does hazardous waste clean up.
    That not being the case where you work, and in my own hospital experience, it's the nurse who cleans up the bulk and housekeeping that comes in to put down the bleach and shine and nothing more.
    Remember when they cleaned with Lysol, smelled so much cleaner.
  2. by   Gator,SN
    Most of the time when we have a messy situation its the nurses who get in there to take care of it and thats because the first priority is the patient and getting them cleaned up and comfortable, getting the mess off the floor is second nature to me because of safety reasons.
  3. by   mattsmom81
    One facility I recently worked at (didn't stay long) tried to tell me it was my job to do a terminal clean on a VRE room because they had a patient for that bed. Not only did I not have the time, I had no supplies for properly cleaning and disinfecting all parts of the room, curtains, etc. So much for infection control, they tried to bully me into it. If the hospital wants to admit after hours they need to have a housekeeper to properly clean and disinfect dirty rooms, IMO.

    I'll clean up and empty bursting full trashbags and disinfect my worksurfaces, but I will NOT clean dirty rooms to prep for a new patient.
  4. by   leslie :-D
    under Nursing News, there's a thread about how there are 2,000,000 hospital acquire infections....

    do you think there's any link between sloppy housekeeping and the astronomical rate of 'PREVENTABLE' nosocomial infections????

    leslie
  5. by   lifeisbeautiful
    This is an ongoing joke where I work. We always say this to one another when we have to do something completely out of our written job description that we signed when we were hired, "I am glad I got my BSN in nursing to be a nurse..and a secretary...and a housekeeper...and a counselor..and a waitress".:chuckle
  6. by   barefootlady
    Nurses do the bulk of the cleaning when a patient has a "serious" accident here. Housekeeping just glosses over the top of the room most of the time. I cannot count the times I have had to page a supervisor to get housekeeping to return to finish cleaning a room properly. Dirt and dust bunnies under beds, sticky table tops, and cobwebs on windowseals. Recently a supervisor told the staff to finish a room, housekeeping was on lunch, well every RN, LPN, CNA was working through their lunch time, so the room did not get finished until 22:00. No admits that evening.
  7. by   Tweety
    Quote from earle58
    under Nursing News, there's a thread about how there are 2,000,000 hospital acquire infections....

    do you think there's any link between sloppy housekeeping and the astronomical rate of 'PREVENTABLE' nosocomial infections????

    leslie

    Could be, but the current thinking is it is the nasty nurses fault for not washing their hands properly. It's always the nurses fault for anything and everything don't ya know?
  8. by   Tweety
    Quote from lifeisbeautiful
    This is an ongoing joke where I work. We always say this to one another when we have to do something completely out of our written job description that we signed when we were hired, "I am glad I got my BSN in nursing to be a nurse..and a secretary...and a housekeeper...and a counselor..and a waitress".:chuckle
    LOL That's how I describe my job when I'm in the mood. "Excuse me sir are you a nurse? " "Yes, I'm the charge nurse, the secretary, the dietician, the orderly, the housekeeper, the case manager, and the nurse's aide....how may I help you?" Usually gets a laugh.
  9. by   palesarah
    I'm amazed that nurses are expected to do the bulk of the cleaning in so many facilities!

    We are supposed to page housekeeping after a delivery to wipe down the bed, mop, etc. The hospital has limited housekeeping staff from 11-7, and while they will come if we page them, we can't be guaranteed that they will come at the most convienient time for my patient (usually when we get her up to shower). So if it's not a big mess I'll usually do it myself- I'm in the room anyway!- so my patient can get some rest after. I know where the mop is and I know how to use it! Housekeeping will do a more thorough cleaning in the AM. If at any time there is a big mess, or any situation that requires housekeeping's expertise, of course I'll page them. I don't want to risk spreading infection by doing something incorrectly. But if it's something simple, I can't see the point of paging housekeeping to empty a garbage, change out a linen hamper, simple things that take less time to do myself than it would to page them. I was shocked the other day- the staff bathroom ran out of soap. A couple people complained about it. I overheard and said "there are extra bottles of soap in the housekeeping closet, the key is on that hook right behind you" to the loudest complainer (who, may I add, was sitting around doing NOTHING). She said "or I could page housekeeping and they could get it for us". I replied- "or you could spend the 30 seconds it would take to page them to do it yourself and not have to wait for them to get up here!"

    Some people are just lazy... and spoiled. We have an excellent housekeeping staff and good hospital policy... some of these nurses would never make it at some of these other hospitals!
  10. by   Energizer Bunny
    complete diversion off topic but your sig. quote "When life hands you lemons, ask for tequila and salt!" Is hilarious!!! I LOVE IT!!!
  11. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from 3rdShiftGuy
    Could be, but the current thinking is it is the nasty nurses fault for not washing their hands properly. It's always the nurses fault for anything and everything don't ya know?
    i'm sure we're to blame, what else is new? but realistically, as op pointed out in this other thread under nursing news, think about all of the cross contamination if bedrails, bedside tables, bathrooms/faucets, equipment....if those aren't cleaned effectively and consistently then it's no darned wonder these infections are so horrifically high.

    so meanwhile, we nurses are putting our foot down on general principal (which i agree with 100%) yet housekeeping has such a slower paced mode of working....i don't know how many times i've seen housekeepers (gen'l statement), strolling from room to room, catching what's on tv....and to top it off, i'm not even certain if they understand the implications of not cleaning everything that needs to be cleaned. after all, if it 'looks' clean, do you think it's going to get cleaned???? again, there are excellent housekeepers but their expectations/policies put much of the brunt of it on us......again.
  12. by   Nurse GOODNIGHT
    In my hosp houskeeping is called housecreeping-'cause they're so slow-cleaning up cath labs, rooms, etc. but the point is they do clean....what's the point of them being there? But if we see something while with the pt we help out the pt. Also your CNA will remember if you call her while you're right there and could do it. Next time your tushys in a jam, she'll remember. We also have service people that pass out food trays and fresh water in addition to the CNAs,
    Last edit by Nurse GOODNIGHT on Jul 4, '04
  13. by   canoehead
    Quote from rn4nicu
    nurses allow themselves to be suckered right into it with the "well if your patient needs this to be done, what kind of nurse are you if you don't just automatically do it." [/i]
    i want to add that many times the patient needs something to be done and we are barred from doing it because of territorialism, or another dept wants to be able to charge for a service. why is it always the crappy work that falls into "well the patient needs it" argument, but have a nurse step up and do diabetic teaching, or give a neb, and we are not qualified?

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