Should Respiratory Care get its own mid-level provider credential? - page 6

by incrediblehulk2016 7,459 Views | 51 Comments

I know this is primarily a nursing forum, but Respiratory and RRT/RN dual title holders are also very prominent in this forum, but me being an RRT/and current PA student, I have an interest in this particular question: Every... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from chrisspeilmanrules84
    Interesting.....



    Ok , I just don't see why having more mid level providers I'd bad, but its ok for nursing to have everything?
    Its not bad per say... If there is a true need for an advanced level of respiratory care then by all means lets get them trained. I'm just not convinced that there is a need that can't be filled by existing professions (i.e. Pulmonologists, ACNPs, PAs, AAs, or even RNs). Its getting to the point where we have a specialist and the associated assistants for every disease.
    elkpark likes this.
  2. 0
    Quote from SycamoreStudent

    Its not bad per say... If there is a true need for an advanced level of respiratory care then by all means lets get them trained. I'm just not convinced that there is a need that can't be filled by existing professions (i.e. Pulmonologists, ACNPs, PAs, AAs, or even RNs). Its getting to the point where we have a specialist and the associated assistants for every disease.
    ^agreed.

    The logical sense is that if RTs want to bridge out at some point to a Bachelors, they could have the option to go for an already established Mid-Level practitioner degree, such as PA or NP. There are tracks already established for straight MSN programs, and RTs can make a great transition into these programs because of the familiarity of anatomy and physiology, physics, and that their specialty is an important part of bedside nursing.

    In my opinion, we have plenty of bridges and overlapping of health team members. To reach a point of a team of people for every body system would do more harm than good...each "system" member would end up having potential opposing plans of care, potentially driving up costs and possibly increasing pt morbidity. There is a reason why there is a saying about "too many cooks in the kitchen..."

    I think the best thing about having mid level practitioners are the ability to have these providers pull it all together. There are increasing NPs in ICUs, transplant teams, ERs, General Hospitalists, Endocrinology, Cardiology, Pulmonary/ENT, Surgery, Pediatrics...I have and are working side by side with them. I had a NP come by to see her pt last night who had reconstructive surgery for her trachea. She is an Pulmonolgy/ENT NP. So it's happening.


    I have worked with co worker who went to PA school and was an exceptional PA for a Cardiology practice that my mother went to. They were a great team of MDs, NPs, and PAs. As well as seen PAs on a surgical team, Hospitalist team, dermatology, Family practice, as well. Again, it's happening.

    The MD, NP, PA, Nursing, Therapist team is doing well. There are plenty of opportunities to go under an umbrella and practice...there is specifically no need to institute another umbrella.


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