Shortage of RNs not LPNS!... - page 2

hi everyone...its been a while since i have been in this website..i appreciate ALL of the advice i have gotten from a lot of wonderful people...im a lil upset though...i just became an LPN in July... Read More

  1. by   slinkeecat
    I was an LPN for a long time... I became an RN w/ a BSN degree because I saw the writing on the wall. My health as far as having diabetes will not allow me to be a staff nurse forever, so i got the degree so I can pursue other facets of nursing.... teaching, whatever....
  2. by   MNlpn
    There are only about 50 of us LPNs here at the hospital I work at in Minnesota. I did several years of LTC before hospital nursing. The pay rate at the LTC places stunk. I've been at the hospital 9 yrs now and make $21.03 plus shift differential. We are unionized so that helps with our pay scale! We are getting ready to negotiate a new contract this month, so hopefully they will meet our demands and we'll continue to increase in salary. Every little bit helps hehehe.
  3. by   pissa
    Good luck!
  4. by   mickeypat
    I think the shortage of LPNs depends on where you are at. Here where I am... there are quite a few job openings... but it depends on what you are looking for. Dang! I sure wish I could make $19 an hour!!!! Would love that!
  5. by   Elisheva
    Things must have changed in the 10 years I've been gone from nursing. There were almost as many LPNs on our med-surg floors as RNs.

    I am an ADN but plan to get my BSN. In the present environment, more education may be the only answer to broader job choices, I think.
  6. by   Elisheva
    The pay scale here for an RN in the hospital starts at 17.00. I made almost as much as a secretary. My daughter, who has no college but was an MP in the military and works in security, makes much more than that per hour.
    Bummer, huh?
  7. by   ColetteFL
    Your first job - whether it's LTC or a hospital @ $12.50 - will not be the job that you have for the rest of your life. Relax, be flexible, and soak up all the experience you can, wherever you can. It will look good on your resume, you will gain experience no matter where you work, and you will find yourself an "LPN II" before yoou know it.

    Keep smiling; it's all good. :wink2: :wink2:
  8. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from mickeypat
    I think the shortage of LPNs depends on where you are at. Here where I am... there are quite a few job openings... but it depends on what you are looking for. Dang! I sure wish I could make $19 an hour!!!! Would love that!
    There's quite a shortage of LVNs in the Dallas-Fort Worth area of Texas. My friend and I are both LVNs with less than 1 year of experience. She earns $20 per hour and I earn $18.50 hourly at a nursing home.
  9. by   calmone
    I haven't read all replys so hope I'm not :deadhorse. I graduated and got my LPN almost a year ago to date. I got hired at my current job, LTC, right after I got my license. I LOVE it. I've volunteered at LTC places for years. I love the interaction with older people. I love their stories and the way they truly enjoy visiting with you. Anyway, having said that, I will be going back to school in January to get my RN. Why?! Because I will make more money. No way am I leaving my place of work, but once I get my RN I will make more $$$ per hour for pretty much the same job. I love my job, the residents, the facility and my co-workers, I just want more $$$$!!
  10. by   Jules A
    Quote from mickeypat
    I think the shortage of LPNs depends on where you are at. Here where I am... there are quite a few job openings... but it depends on what you are looking for. Dang! I sure wish I could make $19 an hour!!!! Would love that!
    I agree and it seems like the pay is really about area also. A friend of mine in a state 1 1/2 hour away started as an LPN at $12.50 and I was shocked. During my clinical rotations I was in several hospitals that hire LPNs even on L&D and rehab. I have another friend that was hired by her current employer from CNA to LPN at $26 per hour so go figure.
  11. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from Jules A
    I agree and it seems like the pay is really about area also. A friend of mine in a state 1 1/2 hour away started as an LPN at $12.50 and I was shocked. During my clinical rotations I was in several hospitals that hire LPNs even on L&D and rehab. I have another friend that was hired by her current employer from CNA to LPN at $26 per hour so go figure.
    Here are the general rules of thumb for LPN/LVN pay.....and please feel free to correct me if I have stated something that's erroneous. Rural areas tend to pay poorly. Also, many of the Southern states pay very terribly, most likely due to the lower cost-of-living. Large metropolitan areas tend to offer the most decent LPN/LVN pay.
  12. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Rural areas tend to pay less because they can get away with it. Facilities in a rural area know that somoene would have to drive, say, 30 miles to the next town to find another place to work, and some people wouldn't do that.

    In a larger town, where someone might have their pick of jobs, facilities have to do something to make their jobs seem more appealing.
  13. by   weirdRN
    I was an LPN before I became an RN.

    That just isn't true... (I have not read all the replys. (no time right now) I am responding directly to the OP). There IS a shortage of NURSES, LPNs and RNs. The job may not be exactly what you want for this or that shift or this or that pay but there is a place for you. And RNs do Not get all the good jobs. There are some EXCELLENT positions available for LPNs; if you look hard enough and sell yourself and your skill set in the right way. BUT before you can expect to go out and conquer the world, you must have some practical experience. I encourage you to spend a year in a LTCF. Typically for LPNs they pay better than hospitals. Mostly because LPNs are the RNs in LTC. Does that make sense? Probably not but it is true in a lot of LTCFs.

    Right now a Brand NEW LPN in the LTC facility where I work is paid $15/hr to start. A New RN $19/hr. The job descriptions are nearly identical. Every other nursing job is forty-five minutes to three hours from home for me. I have approximately 30 residents to pass meds for, chart on and do treatments on. The stress is NUTS! But in the end as another wrote, I will have mastered time management, and prioritization as well as learned a lot about the population I am serving.

    I wish you luck in your search and hope that you get what you are wanting!

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