Shabbos/Religious Observances - page 17

As I begin the applications process for nursing schools, I have one huuuuge concern - my religious obligations. I am not permitted to work/attend school, etc. from sunset Friday nights until an hour... Read More

  1. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from lamazeteacher
    By the way, in Toronto, the official "blue nose" place in Canada, Jews were allowed to sell bagels in the downtown Jewish area on Sunday mornings in the 1940s, (before commerce was allowed 7 days a week) They didn't work Saturdays, so it was an effort to be fair.
    New York always permitted Jewish shops to be open on Sunday despite the blue laws.
  2. by   eltrip
    Fabulous discussion! I'm just chiming in here as one with a Jewish family, my mother's side. The most I learned about Judiasm growing up was learning about Hanukah...which I now celebrate with my children.

    Fiddler on the Roof provided me with the visual for why my great-great grandparents left Romania& Poland for life in Brooklyn. Helped me to understand why my Grandpa felt that converting to Christianity would be a betrayal of all his forefathers had endured for their faith.

    Thanks one & all!
  3. by   texasmommy
    Just FYI - women don't have to sleep in a separate room when they are niddah (bleeding/waiting for mikvah night).
  4. by   Josh L.Ac.
    Quote from lamazeteacher
    Dear Josh:
    Polite people don't criticise others' beliefs.
    The obvious reply would have to be "why?"


    I understand the need on a message board like this to force people to be polite to each other, but in the real world, why can't we point out the obvious rational flaws of certain beliefs?

    If someone makes a ridiculous statement during a debate, it is acceptable to counter the claim by pointing out the logical inconstancies of the statement. But once that person claims that their statement is based on religious belief, for some reason it is no longer polite to point out the error in the statement.

    Why does the title of "religious and/or cultural belief" somehow make a statement unable to be analyzed?

    Quote from lamazeteacher
    I'd hate to think of any society without the wholeness and bonding that religion creates.
    So would it be impossible for a society to have wholeness and bonding without religion? To be honest, I would be afraid to live in a society where the fear and/or belief of god is required for people to feel whole and bond with each other.


    This is an extension of the "without god people would commit evil deeds" rebuttal, which basically goes like this:

    Statement: "Without god, people would commit evil deeds. Thus, god is necessary for to keep people good and to prevent them from killing, robbing, and raping each other. With god, people in a community get along and are at peace."

    Rebuttal question: "So without god, you would kill, rape, and steal from your neighbor?"


    Obvious reply: "Of course not."


    Final rebuttal: "So why is belief in god still necessary to keep the peace?"





    Still great discussion, BTW.
  5. by   Josh L.Ac.
    Quote from ChloeinAtl
    Actually Josh, this is a perfect example of why fundamentalist extremism needs to fade away.
    Many Eastern religions are symbolic, not literal. For example "an eye for an eye" is not what many think as being vengeance sought for poking out an enemy's eye, but a commercial monetary trade. I'll give you this for that, but not actual physical act of battery.

    There's a whole system of trade that spoke in different terms than we understand it. One more reason for the diverse branches seen in Judaisim for example. The belief systems of how to interpret the testament. Which is also reasoning for why some keep kosher and some don't.

    One cannot blasphemize (is this a word?) all religions for one's own lack of understanding. That leads to bigger and scarier things.

    I try to look at it this way...it's called "faith" for a reason. If I believe so deeply about something, it is because I have faith in it.

    Then again, I don' t drive my faith around on my bumper, nor shove it in anyone's face or bring it into the workplace or anywhere I don' t think it belongs. It is what moves me; something else is bound to move someone else. I can respect that.

    Live and let live. There's a mantra for us. I think Lucy in The Peanuts used to espouse it.

    Chloe
    That was a great reply, but I do have to ask the question:

    Why would you need to believe in something so deeply, possibly in contrast to logic and current evidence, to the point where faith is required?
  6. by   Chloe'sinNYNow
    Quote from Josh L.Ac.
    That was a great reply, but I do have to ask the question:

    Why would you need to believe in something so deeply, possibly in contrast to logic and current evidence, to the point where faith is required?
    Whose logic Josh? Yours?

    And "evidence to the contrary" as the saying goes, isn't medicine still in its own infancy? It's being advanced daily, and it's still debated, tested, researched and practiced.

    I believe that to hold deeply to my own faith is my business, in my practice that does no harm, and I believe in it for myself. I owe you no explanation.

    Respectfully,
    Chloe
  7. by   Josh L.Ac.
    Quote from ChloeinAtl
    Whose logic Josh? Yours?

    And "evidence to the contrary" as the saying goes, isn't medicine still in its own infancy? It's being advanced daily, and it's still debated, tested, researched and practiced.

    I believe that to hold deeply to my own faith is my business, in my practice that does no harm, and I believe in it for myself. I owe you no explanation.

    Respectfully,
    Chloe
    That's my point. With logic, all those involved can debate and evaluate the merits of each side. But with "faith", as you just said, you owe no explanation. End of conversation.

    So is religion / faith / belief less about right and wrong, which should be debated, and more about privacy, which probably shouldn't?
  8. by   Tweety
    Moderator Note: I think there is a good discussion going on (without Terms of Service Violations) and I encourage you to continue to be respectful of all opinions, regardless of whether or not it's popular, while you are discussing this topic and challenging each other. Thanks!
  9. by   sharona97
    I have two points.

    1. IMO faith is a feeling of goodness, that brings peace to a personal soul. It also begets trust for your wellbeing and allows a personal expression to privately speak to or for another's soul. Faith to me is a very personal thing. How one celebrates their faith is there right.

    2. A post was written that talked about the bible "for instance", as possibly being developed as "whispers". To me, the bible was written through decades of information learned and past down and eventually placed ina written format. Just as I believe other cultures of people have learned their religion or traditions through past generations being passed down. It seems to me that this is an intended way of learning the teachings of your people or cultures and that they each appear in a separate faction. I find that very heartwarming and traditional. I believe traditions are sacred.
  10. by   FireStarterRN
    Faith sometimes leads to zealous acts by fanatics. Faith has many expressions, not all appear positive to an average person.
  11. by   CITCAT
    i remember a circumstance where there was a minister/lpn working in ltc and he worked midnites so no interference with his duties,I would see him on his lunchbreaks preparing his sermons or whatnot, He negotiated his shift due to his profession as a nurse/minister/reverrand.So the ltc was aware and had no problem with it I have worked in the past on holidayseaster,christmas,good friday, jewish,muslim holidays with no problem becuase somebodys got to be there right.Hey I make the xtra money thats okay God still loves me
  12. by   sharona97
    Quote from jlsRN
    Faith sometimes leads to zealous acts by fanatics. Faith has many expressions, not all appear positive to an average person.
    True,like I mentioned it's an individual thing as I see it, but I know what you mean.
  13. by   FireStarterRN
    Quote from sharona97
    True,like I mentioned it's an individual thing as I see it, but I know what you mean.
    Yes, it's very individual, I agree.

close