Setting a bad example? - page 4

I am curious about what people think about working nurses who are extremely out of shape, obese, smokers, etc. I work in a CVICU where a good portion of the nurses are overweight and out of shape,... Read More

  1. by   fergus51
    You're welcome Suzy
  2. by   VAC
    fergus and suzy,

    I once worked on a mother baby unit and we did plenty of teaching on the night shift. Most patients were out of there in 24 hours, maybe 48, so we had little choice.

    MC14,
    Babies are not always born during convienent teaching hours, and only babies and moms on television get to sleep through the night.
  3. by   VAC
    Originally posted by 3651bht
    [B]someone who is overweight is the best person to teach another about nutrition... Been there done that.. Also, unless you have walked a mile in my shoes don't even pretend to understand me... B]
    I think someone who has been overweight and kept the weight off would be a better teacher.
  4. by   RNKitty
    I work at an alternative birth center where the women stay 6 -24 hours post partum. The teaching gets done during teachable moments, regardless of the time of day. LOL Suzy and Fergus!
  5. by   thisnurse
    seeing as how customer service is such a big part of our jobs now, how bout we let patients order their nurses from a nurse menu

    1. blonde, brunette, redhead, other
    2. diploma, adn, bsn, masters, other
    3. smoking, nonsmoking,other
    4. petite, small, medium, large, extra large, other
    5. PERKY, serious, ditzy, other
    6. male, female, other
  6. by   mcl4
    Originally posted by fergus51


    Mcl4 on a L&D or PP floor a lot of teaching can be done at night because these women are not going to be getting any sleep anyways. Some are awake to breastfeed, others are in the transitional stage and getting their vitals done every fifteen minutes. A lot of new moms don't get the same level of prenatal care you obviously had and we have to grab every teachable moment there is whether it's 3 am and they have a baby on their breast or it's one in the afternoon. I understand how it can be different from other floors, but teaching in the middle of the night is not unusual on an OB unit.

    The point was that significant lifestyle changes are not appropriate to be taught on other floors at night. Lecturing about the negatives of smoking or poor eatting habbits are not done while a patient has been sleeping at two in the morning.


    How much detail do you go into with a patient in the middle of the night. I've floated to ob and I've brought babies to their mothers. After checking their wrist bands/baby identification band, I've asked if they needed any assistance with bottle/breastfeeding and most are pretty comfortable with feeding their babies. Most of the moms are too tired to even turn on a light so I'm still questioning how effective you are with moms that are extremely tired and can't imagine spending a lengthy time going into detail with what their exericse routine should be in the middle of the nights. In fact, with all my children (several), not one ob nurse (and there were many) told me any facts about diet and exercise other then I need to increase my fluid intake.
    There were television programs as well as classes that were optional during the day hours if you wish to attend them.
  7. by   mcl4
    Originally posted by RNKitty
    I work at an alternative birth center where the women stay 6 -24 hours post partum. The teaching gets done during teachable moments, regardless of the time of day. LOL Suzy and Fergus!
    At six hours, how much teaching, if any, can be done.
  8. by   mcl4
    MC14,
    Babies are not always born during convienent teaching hours, and only babies and moms on television get to sleep through the night. [/B][/QUOTE]


    You grab any minute or hour you can during the night to sleep. Sleep deprivation, even PP, isn't healthy.
  9. by   mcl4
    Originally posted by Susy K



    Thank you, Fergus.
    And you still haven't address the pertinent orginal issue of other floors talking about lifestyle changes which is different then teaching a mother how to breastfeed. I'm guessing you don't float too much outside of ob?
    I
  10. by   mcl4
    Originally posted by VAC


    I think someone who has been overweight and kept the weight off would be a better teacher.
    The best person is a dietitian who has spent years studying this topic and also has all the up to date information to help a person attain their goal weight. The dietitian will also be there to follow up with any question/concerns from a patient well pass being discharge. But in reality, it will be up to the individual's responsibility to implement the changes necessary in order to be successful.
  11. by   mcl4
    I work often in a cardiac unit and advocate for patients to picks 3 or 4 things that they are confident they can change immediately and to build on those when they go home. This is a much more logical approach than the all of nothing approach I hear touted so often.


    My father's cardiac nurse was not small and she was a wonderful caring teacher/nurse. She had your above approach and dad did make the changes necessary after a triple bypass. He also had the assistance of cardiac rehab department for several weeks after being discharge. Diet and exercise were the two areas that he made the most drastic changes.
  12. by   mcl4
    I for one hope the nurses that Matt works with dont know his feelings on this issue, that would probably make for a poor work dynamic and seem that he - along with the rest of the world- is passing judgement on them based on their weight. [/B][/QUOTE]


    I also wonder this, but so far it looks like no nurses from North Memorial in Minneapolis, Minnesota reads the Allnurses.com boards??
  13. by   ohbet
    If you take the Nurses Code of Ethics seriously,which supposedly all nurses are bound to, a nurse who smokes or who is fat is an unethical nurse because nurses wouldnt encourage their patients to be that way ,so the respect nurses owe to others the are to give to themselves.

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