"Send my girl down here now"...(Please.....) - page 3

by Jason-ACNP 2,879 Views | 41 Comments

I was writing a progress note today on a cardiac step-down unit when my concentration was shattered by a booming voice coming through the patient-call system. An 60 y/o gentleman (for lack of a better word)exclamied, "Send my... Read More


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    You have a valid point. I've seen many patients who have not handled the thought of having a cardiac cath (or other procedures) very well. I can certainly understand that. However, this was not the case in this particular situation. This patient is a frequent flyer (with a history of numerous admissions for unstable angina, acute exacerbations of COPD, and other problems from a lack of compliance). He has been deemed a "cantakerous old fart" by his cardiologist. He truly is a red-neck Neanderthal who has little regard for nurses, and he enjoys the attention he receives from them.(And he has been cathed before). But again, your point is well taken. However, I do feel that this type of patient (and their family) is a growing problem that stems from a lack of respect for nurses (vs. fear or anxiety from a procedure,etc.) In most cases, I would address the patient's fears, while making it clear that the patient should think long and hard before he or she starts to spew condescending rhetoric and/or demanding orders to their nurses. Thanks for your reply.

    QUOTE]Originally posted by lkushen:
    OK, I fully agree with the emotions and anger you experienced. However, the question that comes to mind is this: Is this man always like this or just today, maybe there was an ulterior motive to getting the nurse to the bedside before you rightfully let him have it. Maybe this patient was not coping well with the thought of undergoing a cardiac catherization. Just a thought. I will admit though that I have been in similar situations by abusive and demanding patients before and it just makes you want to SCREAM!!![/QUOTE]

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    Thanks for the info. Although I enjoy watching Jay on occassion, I'm going to let NBC know that his remark was "over the top".

    Originally posted by Robin61970:
    I did a search on Jay leno and found the website to NBC....It's easy to find...anyway I wrote a letter to Jayo leno about his joke.....you should all do the same...stand up and be heard....not that he will pay a whole lot of attention, but It made me feel better! And I have to say Kudos to Jason...I might have handled it a bit differently, but to the same end effect...as for the dog? Oh NO! I would have had to say something ***** about that one....
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    What?????????? Now I've have heard it all. That is truly amazing. Tell her that on behalf of nurses everywhere, I say
    "thank-you".

    Originally posted by nanablue2:
    Jason, I wish you had been on our unit tonight to respond to the most outrageous request I've ever heard by a patient and their family. The nurse was called to the room to clean up the dump left on the floor by the patients' visiting pooch. The nurse refused of course, but can you beleive it? Of all the nerve...and I thought we'd seen it all.
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    I agree that we need to unify as a profession to fight our battles. However, I disagree that we should not get the government involved. Legislators are there (in theory) to serve the the public (including nurses). Legislators aren't going to support us based on how well we fight our own battles. They do however look at two things. A.) How much PAC money your organization can offer, and B.) How many people are within your organization (votes) Case in point. While there are much fewer MDs than nurses in this country, the AMA is the nation's most powerful political organization (bigger than the NRA). That's because most physicians do belong to the AMA (at a cost of $5,000 to $10,000 per year depending on their specialty) so that they can have their interests protected. A huge chunk of those dues goes to build up PAC money. The POTENTIAL advantage in nursing is that there is approx. 2.4 to 2.5 million nurses in this country. If we could band together and come up with common goals, then we could make significant changes at both the state and national level. In the end, if you can generate enough support within one group of people, then you will see favorable legislation. Politicians seem to have a strong affinity for the power they wield, and thus will go where the votes are. If it wasn't for our state nursing organization being politically active, then APNs in our state would not have prescriptive authority. I know that there is a big debate of whether the ANA is effective or not, but I won't get into that. Just remember, there is power in numbers, and legislators clearly know this. For instance, is mandatory overtime against the law in your state? It isn't (or wasn't) in all states. Kind of scary. Thatis an issue that you (if needed) could address to your legislator. If 20,000 of the 28,000 RNs and APNs in my state emailed their legislator, then mandatory overtime would not be a problem. They would tell hospital administrators, "Hire travelers at whatever the cost, because we aren't having mandatory overtime..I like my job too much to be voted out".

    Originally posted by wildtime88:
    I get to see this type of behavior all the time in the ER. Yes, there are some people who react this way because of their disease process, but there are many people who are just plain rude. Patients and their families who come in with a stubbed toe or the flu who demand immediate service because they have somewhere important to be. The ones who are brutally honest and say they do not want to wait. I think the best ones are the V.I.P.s either by position in the community, their relative, or someone they know who expect to go straight back and get right out.

    I also concur with the physician said about nursing and a lack of back bone as well. If we will not face the people who we have a problem with directly without getting everyone else to fight our battles for us then we get what we deserve. We are being told that we have to get the public and the government on our side to fight our battle for us. That they will change things for us. Maybe we should fight out own battle and earn the respect of the public and the government first. Then we could use that new found respect to advance nursing forward.
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    Okay, enough is enough. Stop this, "Oh, how was the patient feeling that day? Is he always like this? Maybe we should break thru the fear barrier and find out what we can do to help!" What a load of crap!!! I'm not paid to be disrespected, abused, or to have to put up with nasty people. Scared or not scared, THERE IS NO REASON NOT TO TREAT SOMEBODY WITH RESPECT!!!!!!! And yes, I am yelling!!!!! Drop the nursing theory act, and step into the real world. Why can't you nurses just agree with a post without sounding condescending. People deserve to be treated the way they treat others. This man got what he deserved. So leave Jason alone.
    Originally posted by lkushen:
    OK, I fully agree with the emotions and anger you experienced. However, the question that comes to mind is this: Is this man always like this or just today, maybe there was an ulterior motive to getting the nurse to the bedside before you rightfully let him have it. Maybe this patient was not coping well with the thought of undergoing a cardiac catherization. Just a thought. I will admit though that I have been in similar situations by abusive and demanding patients before and it just makes you want to SCREAM!!!
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    I tried to email the tonight show but got a reply back that the address posted was no longer in use by the show. If someone has a valid email address could they post it?

    Thanks
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    Way to go Jason. I work in a burn unit as a tech right now but in January I will be a full fledged nurse. I get abuse from patients heaped on me all of the time. Most often it is during dressing changes. We get a lot of drug and alcohol dependent people in our unit because they did something stupid and got burned. Of course these people get over the amount of required pain med because of their high tolerance. I get called all kind of names and have had people put their fists up at me. Thank God we have Doc's who will stand up for us and tell these people that if they do not like the treatment that they have to have and are getting, that they can leave AMA. But that in no way shape or form will they verbally or physically abuse the staff. Most of the time this settles these jerks down although we have had some who did leave, but were back a few days later because they could not stand the pain. They are more compliant and apoligetic when they come back.
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    Go to the LEno topic for addresses
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    I have to agree with Wildtime on the government issue. This is the same government that fired the all Air Traffic Controllers when they treatened a strike.
  10. 0
    When faced with situations like this, I always smile and tell the patient that 'moving those limbs' (ROM), is an important part of their care, then leave the room. It isn't rude, and, they always get the point.


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