RNs on strike - page 2

UAN Nurses on STRIKE in NY RNs STRIKE at St. Catherine of Siena Medical Center Strike Smithtown, Long Island, NY - Registered nurses of St. Catherine of Siena Medical Center (NY) filed... Read More

  1. by   -jt
    Oregon/UAN nurses to strike:

    competetive wages - "If Not Now, When?"

    OHSU RNs Vote to Strike
    11/30/01

    The 1,500 ONA registered nurses at the Oregon Health Sciences University voted on Nov. 29 to authorize a strike that could begin as soon as Dec. 17. At issue are fair wages and an increased RN responsibility for insurance premiums. For more information, go to:

    Oregon Nurses Association - Contract Negotiation at OHSU
    http://www.Ona.org/
  2. by   -jt
    Michigan/UAN nurses and healthcare professionals vote to strike:

    Forced OT, Wages and Benefits, Staffing Issues Drive Strike Vote at Sparrow
    11/20/01

    Health care professionals at Sparrow Hospital in Lansing, Michigan, today over whelmingly authorized a strike if negotiations do not move forward. Negotiations sessions with a mediator are scheduled for Nov. 27. The Michigan Nurses Association represents nearly 1,800 registered nurses, medical technicians, physical therapists, pharmacists and other healthcare professionals at the facility. For more information:

    Welcome to UAN - The Union for Nurses, by Nurses
    http://www.UANnurse.org
  3. by   -jt
    Michigan/UAN healthcare professionals strike vote gets immediate results:

    Sparrow Health Care Professionals Reach Tentative Agreement
    11/30/01

    The 1,800 Michigan Nurses Association/UAN RNs and other health care professionals at Sparrow Hospital in Lansing, Michigan, reached a tentative three-year agreement early this morning. On Nov. 20, a strike had been over-whelmingly authorized by MNA members there. Not surpisingly, that vote produced results within 10 days - helping the administration to see the light.
    more info at : http://www.Minurses.org
  4. by   -jt
    RALLY HELD FOR STRIKING NURSES AT ST CATHERINE'S
    http://www.nysna.org/NEWS/current/stcath.htm

    More than 400 people, including NYSNA President Bob Piemonte, RN, United American Nurses director Susan Bianchi-Sand, and Congressman Steve Israel attended a rally Saturday for striking nurses at St. Catherine of Siena Medical Center............

    Representatives of numerous labor, nursing, religious, and legislative organizations also attended to pledge their support. Ms. Bianchi-Sand presented NYSNA Economic & General Welfare Program Director Lorraine Seidel, RN with a $5,000 check for the strikers. Nurses from area hospitals joined St. Catherine colleagues in the 70 sunshine to listen to speakers and sing along with labor tunes and satirical songs.........

    Attendees heard words of support from NYSNA board member Ed Goldberg, RN; Delegate Assembly Chair Judy Sheridan-Gonzalez, RN; Nyack Hospital NYSNA chair Howard Doughty, RN; and others........

    NYSNA President-elect Lolita Compas, RN and board member Ann Tahaney, RN also encouraged nurses, as did members from Maimonides Hospital and other facilities......

    "You're striking for two reasons: for the sake of your patients, and for the sake of our profession," Seidel reminded the crowd. Piemonte said, "NYSNA is behind you 100%. We know you're united and determined, and we know you're going to win!"......

    Participants enthusiastically cheered encouraging news: the Windham Watch Hotel refused to house scab nurses the hospital flew in to replace strikers, and, best of all, Suffolk County Community College nursing students refused to cross NYSNA picket lines for clinical rotations.
    They will work at Southside Hospital instead........

    Among other speakers expressing strike support were representatives from the PEF, CSEA, United Food and Commercial Workers Union, and the Long Island Federation of Labor.........

    Suffolk County Legislature member Bill Lindsay said, "You're here because when nurses are forced to work 16 hours a day, the system is broken." Congressman Israel told the crowd, "We're here to stand up for quality care through quality staffing ratios. We need to stop understaffing here, to set an example for the rest of America." A representative from Congressman Gary Ackerman's office reminded attendees that he supported the nurses when the hospital, then owned by Episcopal Health System, was going bankrupt, "and he supports you today." No date has been set for another bargaining session, but negotiators predicted some time after December 10.........

    Send Your Support and Encouragement:

    email: BC512RN@AOL.com

    Messages may also be sent to:

    ebronder@ana.org

    Your letter will be forwarded to St. Catherine's NYSNA nurses.
    >>>>>>>

    CBS News interviewed RNs on the strike line in Smithtown, Long Island Tuesday morning, November 27. The report is scheduled for broadcast on CBS News' The Early Show on Tuesday, December 4, 7:38 A.M.
    Last edit by -jt on Dec 4, '01
  5. by   -jt
    Been asked to pass the on to all of you -

    From the NYSNA nurses on strike at St Catherines in Smithtown, Long Island, NY:

    <<Hi All,

    Today I received a phone call from Barbara Durkin, (BDurkin@newsday.com), from Newsday. She would like to report on the issue of nurses being in high demand and how could any hospital put so many nurses on the street when we can get jobs anywhere.

    She wants to know about the scabs in the building and where they come from. I supplied her with what information I had. I also got a hold of Mark Genovese (mark.genovese@nysna.org) from the NYSNA PR dept. in Albany and asked him contact her too. something our administrators would disagree with right about now - Money seems to be no object to them now does it?

    She wants to know if she will find most of the striking nurses working or at least having many choices about where to go, and if administration knew that, it might get them to move off their duffs. So please if you have something to tell her send her an email or call her at 843-2210. As an RN, inform her of the opportunities you are finding and the offers that you're hearing.

    I have, to date, received email from or spoken to nurses that have intentions of taking other positions, in Stony Brook and other area institutions. They credit this job action as the impetus for them to go out and see what else is out there........

    When we take the blinders off, what a wonderful world it can be......

    We are a formidable group to deal with, our strength is in our numbers.

    Respectfully,
    Barbara Crane
    NYSNA Chair @ St. Catherine of Sienna
    email: BC512RN@aol.com
  6. by   -jt
    2 weeks........ and counting
  7. by   Scraper_1077
    All my best to you all that have the back bone to stand up for what you believe in and for your patients. Hang in there and don't give up until you get what you and your patients deserve.

    With You All The Way,

    Charles D. Ku RN. Still on strike for three years from Petoskey Michigan
  8. by   piscesgirl
    I may not be a nurse yet, but i do remember the nurse's strike a little while ago in st. louis. I supported them then and i support you now. Make your voices heard. Let them know that these are professionals you dont want to mess with!! :smiley_ab
  9. by   zenman
    Quote from piscesgirl
    I may not be a nurse yet, but i do remember the nurse's strike a little while ago in st. louis. I supported them then and i support you now. Make your voices heard. :smiley_ab

    This strike is still going on! My question is who wins here? How are strikers keeping up their skills? Even if you win, just considering the loss in salary and even any salary increases eventually gained, will it take 10 years to gain back what you have lost? Will you gain anything that will benefit patients? Just how effective has this strategy been? Are there no other options?

    Let them know that these are professionals you dont want to mess with!!
    After three years it looks like the big guys do not mind "messing" with them!! How many "professionals in other fields strike?" Just wondering.
  10. by   hipab4hands
    In order for the hospital to ask you to "volunteer" to come in on your days off, they have to be able to contact/find you.
    I solved this problem many years ago- I have a cell phone number and my own personal home number. My employer only has my cell phone number, so If I choose not to answer the phone that day, guess what,they are SOL.
    Problem solved
  11. by   NPAlby
    Quote from zenman
    How many "professionals in other fields strike?" Just wondering.
    How many of them are so grossly overworked, underpaid and unrespected?:angryfire

    Oh and by the way it's not all about money. Those nurse continue to strike despite knowing darn well that they'll never be able to recover the wages lost.
    Last edit by NPAlby on Dec 22, '05
  12. by   NPAlby
    Quote from hipab4hands
    In order for the hospital to ask you to "volunteer" to come in on your days off, they have to be able to contact/find you.
    I solved this problem many years ago- I have a cell phone number and my own personal home number. My employer only has my cell phone number, so If I choose not to answer the phone that day, guess what,they are SOL.
    Problem solved
    That's good on your days off but the days when you're actually working your shift and they come to you is a different story. I've had nursing supervisors ask me to stay for the next shift PLENTY of times. The reason I stayed, and so have many other nurses is b/c we think about the next shift and how hard they'll be hit without that other nurse. On one occassion I was told by the director of nursing that she would be reporting me to the board of nursing if I did not stay to do overtime. And that was as a travel nurse!! I wasn't even staff, I was on a contract that never even mentioned overtime, nevermind mandatory ot.
    I only wish the answer was as easy as turning off or ignoring our cell phones.
  13. by   OC_An Khe
    Simple, have a Union contract that bans mandatory overtime. Work in a state that bans mandatory OT for Nurses. Check your state board of nursing, in most states refusing to work mandatory OT IS NOT patient abandonement.

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