Retire by 30, thanks nursing! - page 5

Ok check this out, i have a plan to retire by the age of 30: I'm 21 yrs old and about to graduate a ADN program i will spend 1 year gaining experience in the ICU, then i will spend the next 8... Read More

  1. by   James Huffman
    Quote from suni
    I think that it would be nice but you certainly are setting yourself up for a major error and hence a major lawsuit. Not to mention having to live with that for the rest of your life. Nursing is a tough job and if you are only in it for the money you need to get out now. We deal with people, most of the time in crisis and you need to be on top of your game all the time.
    I don't care how great a nurse someone is, 60 hours a week does not allow you to process information accurately and someone may die, and that someone may be you.
    Driving home from work exhausted, or setting yourself up for some type of dependency to stay awake.
    You need to re-think this plan.
    Wow, I can hardly live with this kind of optimism.

    Lawsuits? Nurses worry incessantly about lawsuits, while hardly any nurses are ever sued. It's very easy to deal with, if someone is that worried: buy some liability insurance (for almost everyone reading this, less than $100 a year) and forget about it.

    Mistakes? Everyone makes them. Even those who work 8 hours a week. Or whatever. The rule is be the best nurse you can be, do the best you can be, and, again, don't worry about it.

    In it for the money? Who cares? I'd far rather see someone in it for the money, than the crusading do-gooders who are there "to help people." Those "in it for the money" are usually competent, qualified, organized nurses who don't operate with the illusion that nursing is some kind of religious order.

    Just for the record, I routinely work 60 hours a week. I'm self-employed and I love what I do. People who are chronically exhausted aren't usually over-worked -- their problem is that they don't like what they do and don't have a goal. Get a goal, get a plan and aim for it. You might not hit it -- that's the risk you take with a goal -- but you'll go a lot further than someone who's just putzing along.
    Last edit by James Huffman on Dec 11, '07
  2. by   cardiacRN2006
    Quote from StayinOnTheGrind
    Excellent job performance can be maintained working 60 hours a week; it is all dependent upon the individual themselves. .

    I see that you have zero listed for your experience as a nurse. So how would you even know what it's like, or how safe it is, to work 5- 12 hr shifts each and every week?

    These shifts aren't easy. Otherwise, we'd all work 5 12's a week. And shifts typically run >12hrs.

    This plan is naive-at best.

    Great that he's(the OP) an optimist, but he's not a realist, and you need both to be the next "Buffett or Trump"

    We should all be saving what we can----but not at the expense of our patient safety.
  3. by   RNperdiem
    The OP seems to have a financial attitude more commonly found in entrepeneurs than nurses. How often have you heard of nurses planning to amass a large fortune and retire at an early age? Amassing large fortunes is the passion of self-employed go-getters. Don't rule it out.
  4. by   Skeletor
    Quote from suni
    I think that it would be nice but you certainly are setting yourself up for a major error and hence a major lawsuit. Not to mention having to live with that for the rest of your life. Nursing is a tough job and if you are only in it for the money you need to get out now. We deal with people, most of the time in crisis and you need to be on top of your game all the time.
    I don't care how great a nurse someone is, 60 hours a week does not allow you to process information accurately and someone may die, and that someone may be you.
    Driving home from work exhausted, or setting yourself up for some type of dependency to stay awake.
    You need to re-think this plan.
    It's negativity, fear of failure, and pessimism just like this that keeps many members of society from reaching their goals in life. Attention to detail, impeccable work ethic, and dedication to one's "chosen" field play a major role in reducing errors and avoiding the lawsuits that which you speak of.

    I don't see a need for a plan revision, just like I don't see the need for the OP to "get out now."
  5. by   Skeletor
    Quote from cardiacRN2006
    I see that you have zero listed for your experience as a nurse. So how would you even know what it's like, or how safe it is, to work 5- 12 hr shifts each and every week?

    These shifts aren't easy. Otherwise, we'd all work 5 12's a week. And shifts typically run >12hrs.

    This plan is naive-at best.

    Great that he's(the OP) an optimist, but he's not a realist, and you need both to be the next "Buffett or Trump"

    We should all be saving what we can----but not at the expense of our patient safety.
    Forgive me, for I am not the typical older and weathered battleaxe that lusts for the day I can retire; however I am very familiar with working consecutive 12 and 20 (yes you are reading correctly) hour shifts while serving our Great Country in the military. I do know that it isn't safe doing such as I did, but I did it, and I did it with great pride and attention to detail.

    By the way, I did it for the same country where optimism "afforded" us the freedoms which we partake in on a daily basis.
  6. by   cardiacRN2006
    Optimism and realism are two different things.

    My entire family is comprised of veterans, so I am familiar with what it's like to work 7 days a week under the Hot Saudi sun, as told to me by my husband and brothers.



    That being said, it's still not safe for patients when nurses are working 5 12 hour shifts each and every week for 8 years straight. Sorry, it's just doesn't work. It's a mistake waiting to happen...
  7. by   Skeletor
    Quote from cardiacRN2006
    Optimism and realism are two different things.

    My entire family is comprised of veterans, so I am familiar with what it's like to work 7 days a week under the Hot Saudi sun, as told to me by my husband and brothers.



    That being said, it's still not safe for patients when nurses are working 5 12 hour shifts each and every week for 8 years straight. Sorry, it's just doesn't work. It's a mistake waiting to happen...
    So you're not a veteran, your family members are. They told you what it's like to work in the desert, but you haven't actually experienced it yourself? Did I read that correctly?

    By the way, the reality of it all is that optimism is healthy, plain and simple; and negativity, well that's just a virus waiting to be spread.

    Stay focused OP.:spin:
  8. by   cardiacRN2006
    And have I read correctly that you are not a nurse and have no idea what it's like to work in nursing? Did I read that correctly???
  9. by   cardiacRN2006
    When you know what it's like to actually be a nurse and pull 13 hour shifts in the ICU, with everybody pulling you each and every direction, then you can let me know if you will feel like a safe practitioner working 5 12 hour shifts a week for the next 8 years straight.

    Until then, you have no idea of what it's like and can not comment on how attention to detail will prevent you from making mistakes-because you have no clue.
  10. by   Almabella
    Quote from AlwaysLearning!
    Ok check this out, i have a plan to retire by the age of 30:

    I'm 21 yrs old and about to graduate a ADN program
    i will spend 1 year gaining experience in the ICU, then i will spend the next 8 years as a per-diem or traveling nurse, working no less then 60 hrs a week, 11 months a year.
    It's wonderful that you have a financial plan already, as many have said before.

    My only caution to you is that you just don't know what the future holds for you. Quality of life is just as important as your financial goals, and for those 8 years, if you are actually able to stick to this plan, you would have no quality of life outside of work (that is assuming that work is extremely fulfilling for you.

    Enjoy your youth and your life -- it will not last forever! No one on their death bed looks back and wishes they had worked more.
  11. by   mvanz9999
    I refuse to comment on the plan, but only commend you for thinking of retirement at 21. If only I had been like that. It's rare that one considers retirement at such a young age.
  12. by   chuckc
    Quote from StayinOnTheGrind
    Forgive me, for I am not the typical older and weathered battleaxe that lusts for the day I can retire; however I am very familiar with working consecutive 12 and 20 (yes you are reading correctly) hour shifts while serving our Great Country in the military. I do know that it isn't safe doing such as I did, but I did it, and I did it with great pride and attention to detail.

    By the way, I did it for the same country where optimism "afforded" us the freedoms which we partake in on a daily basis.
    This is from a "typical older and weathered battleaxe" that is new to nursing. If you can work a busy med surg unit 60 hours a week for 8 years, then my friend you must have some of the biggest kahunas on the planet and bionic parts to boot!
  13. by   Dottie78
    I'm not a nurse yet, so I can't say I know what its like, but I do know what its like to have a family and a job. To the OP, this is a nice plan, but keep in mind that things don't always go as planned. You're only 21 yrs. old. What if life happens? What if you get married and have children? Once that happens, it will be very difficult to impossible to stick to your original plan of working and traveling all these hours, and saving all this money. It's nice to see someone who is willing to dedicate themselves to nursing, but its not a good idea to make nursing your whole life. When will you have a social life? When will you have time for hobbies? If you're in nursing only for the money, you probably will not enjoy it, and will not last long in the profession. Those are just my thoughts.

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