Retire by 30, thanks nursing! - page 25

Ok check this out, i have a plan to retire by the age of 30: I'm 21 yrs old and about to graduate a ADN program i will spend 1 year gaining experience in the ICU, then i will spend the next 8... Read More

  1. by   mikethern
    Quote from Tait
    Can't say I would like an overworked surgeon operating on me either. I have been in the OR and surgery is violent and rough on a good day, let alone last case on a Friday night.
    Is there such thing as a surgeon who is not overworked?

    Quote from Tait
    I couldn't imagine working double+ that and being reponsible for the management of 3-6 pts (depending on the acuity of the floor) and all the little details involved with patient care.
    Some nurses tolerate stress better than you and I do.

    Quote from Tait
    This career is not an avenue for fast cash and early retirement.
    I find the idea selfish and foolish.
    Then you should ask your employer for a pay cut. How inappropriate that they pay you well.

    By the way, most careers are an avenue for early retirement. You just have to spend less than you earn.
    Last edit by mikethern on Dec 24, '07
  2. by   Jules A
    Quote from mikethern
    By the way, most careers are an avenue for early retirement. You just have to spend less than you earn.
    Very true! Its like maintaining a normal body weight: intake vs. output.
  3. by   moliuchick
    What if you die at 23? or you got pregnant at 24? Things will change over 10 years of time. I was single when I was 30 and I am a mom for two little kids at 39. You can never never really plan out things that way.
    My suggestion is enjoy your life. Nursing is not a easy job. When I was in nursing school, I thought everything will get better once I graduated. After I graduated, I've found out that everything is not what i expected to be. I have a lot of disappointment in the floor nursing. Now I only work for ambulatory service and I think I like my job a little more than before.
    Good luck with whatever you are going to achieve. Good thinking but it is definitely hard to do.
  4. by   Tait
    Quote from mikethern
    Is there such thing as a surgeon who is not overworked?
    Somewhere out there I hope there are surgeons who know thier limitations and schedule themselves as close to appropriate in hours and cases as they can. I do understand that there are busy weeks when it can't be avoided, but a nurse, INTENTIONALLY over scheduling herself in the persuit of money and then to abandon the career in less than 10 years is a different case.

    Some nurses tolerate stress better than you and I do.
    I am wiped after three days because I put every absolute ounce of myself into my work, and I do it well, safely and with passion.

    Then you should ask your employer for a pay cut. How inappropriate that they pay you well.
    At $21.07/hour I am currently making (+$3.50 night differential) I am not sure they can legally dropped my wage or I would most likely be below the cost of living for Atlanta. I suppose if I need to work on my retirement plan I should pick up an extra waitressing job for nights off, I made $25,000 in my best year at that. Eh?

    By the way, most careers are an avenue for early retirement. You just have to spend less than you earn.
    I understand the concept of early retirement, and I feel that 401K and wise investment is the route to go, not sacrificng patient safety, but I have stated this many times in this post already.
  5. by   mikethern
    Quote from Tait
    Somewhere out there I hope there are surgeons who know thier limitations and schedule themselves as close to appropriate in hours and cases as they can. I do understand that there are busy weeks when it can't be avoided, but a nurse, INTENTIONALLY over scheduling herself in the persuit of money and then to abandon the career in less than 10 years is a different case.
    Anyone who decides to become a surgeon is INTENTIONALLY over scheduling herself. No one is forced to become a surgeon. They are volunteering to become workaholics.

    "Many physicians and surgeons work long, irregular hours. Almost one-third of physicians worked 60 hours or more a week in 2002. Physicians and surgeons must travel frequently between office and hospital to care for their patients."
    http://www.umsl.edu/services/govdocs...CO/ocos074.htm

    Quote from Tait
    At $21.07/hour I am currently making (+$3.50 night differential) I am not sure they can legally dropped my wage or I would most likely be below the cost of living for Atlanta. I suppose if I need to work on my retirement plan I should pick up an extra waitressing job for nights off, I made $25,000 in my best year at that. Eh?
    No wonder you are so grumpy.

    Quote from Tait
    I understand the concept of early retirement, and I feel that 401K and wise investment is the route to go, not sacrificng patient safety, but I have stated this many times in this post already.
    And as I have stated in this thread many times, you don't have to work more than 40 hours a week in order to retire early.

    I'm just curious why you seem to think that physicians can handle long hours, but nurses can't.
    Last edit by mikethern on Dec 24, '07
  6. by   Jules A
    Quote from Tait
    At $21.07/hour I am currently making (+$3.50 night differential) I am not sure they can legally dropped my wage or I would most likely be below the cost of living for Atlanta. I suppose if I need to work on my retirement plan I should pick up an extra waitressing job for nights off, I made $25,000 in my best year at that.
    OMG, are you a RN? LPNs here wouldn't work for that. What a shame I would have figured that Atlanta was a more progressive area. My best year waitressing was $45,000 and that was more years back than I care to remember, lol.
  7. by   Tait
    LOL ok this thread has churned my stomach for about an hour now.

    I don't care about the surgeons. I am a nurse, I care for other nurses, I care for my patients, I love my profession and I want to work with others who love it as well.

    I a completely satisfied with my salary. In less than year I will recieve an 8% raise as I move to level II staff nurse. I will be moving to that position not for the raise, but for the fact that it means I am doing my part to be involved with the hospital, its policies, maintenance and progression. I am fortunate to have a fiancee with a professional degree as well and am more than comfortable. I work because I love the work, not the pay. This is why threads like this, and many threads on the forums here frustrate me.

    I love my job, but I can understand why others find themselves hating it. I have been extremely fortunate in my jobs and have always found my working environment to be favorable, and for this I am very thankful.

    I guess my perspective is just the minority and I need to incorporate that into my perspective when I read posts by others.

    Merry Christmas Eve,

    Taitter
  8. by   hollyberry678
    "If a person was disciplined to the point of living on beenie weenies, riding a bicycle, shopping at yard sales, not going on vacations, etc.. "

    Hey, that sounds like my life as a single parent-student (pre graduation). Glad to hear it's considered discipline!
  9. by   Jo Dirt
    Quote from Jules A
    OMG, are you a RN? LPNs here wouldn't work for that. What a shame I would have figured that Atlanta was a more progressive area. My best year waitressing was $45,000 and that was more years back than I care to remember, lol.
    I'm an RN making $18/hr. Crummy pay but good job for me now because it is so convenient.
  10. by   muffie
    i am looking at freedom 85

    and that is being realistic
  11. by   Athenas83
    I thought around $21 an hour starting as an RN was the norm?? Am I wrong?
  12. by   Jules A
    Quote from Athenas83
    I thought around $21 an hour starting as an RN was the norm?? Am I wrong?
    What general area are you in?
    Not here, thank goodness. I'm in the Balto./DC area and LPNs start in the low to mid 20s with benefits and around $28 for per diem work.

    I have a cople of RN friends who have disclosed their salary and keep in mind that they have 10-15 years experience but they are making between $38 and $45.
    Last edit by Jules A on Dec 25, '07
  13. by   Tait
    you have to take into account the cost of living. in wisconsin i started at $22.oo here in atlanta $21.07 for someone with less than a year of experience.

    cost of living comparison from salary.com:

    the cost of living in [color=#0d0d9d]atlanta, ga is [color=#0d0d9d]31.5% lower than in [color=#0d0d9d]washington, dc. therefore, you would have to earn a salary of [color=#0d0d9d]$30,811 to maintain your current standard of living.

    http://swz.salary.com/costoflivingwi...ion=8&x=32&y=7

    this would probably explain part of the difference in salaries from one area to the other.

    ps. oddly enough baltimore is cheaper, but i don't know how they figure for the dc increase which might explain why you get paid more, but not a ton more at starting.

    the cost of living in [color=#0d0d9d]atlanta, ga is [color=#0d0d9d]4.5% higher than in [color=#0d0d9d]baltimore, md. therefore, you would have to earn a salary of [color=#0d0d9d]$47,031 to maintain your current standard of living.
    Last edit by Tait on Dec 25, '07

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