Regents College - page 2

Hi Im considering going back and advancing my degree at Regents. Has anyone had any dealings with the school, what are they like, what have you heard? Are their programs any good? Does the work... Read More

  1. by   spongebob1871
    i am currently enrolled in the excelsior college ADN program. i agree that you do not get the clinical hours that a traditional program requires, but i have worked with several nurses that have go through a traditional program and they didn't have some skills required for the job. i believe that you can be successful, but it does take a lot of dedication. i am curious however, if you have graduated from the program could you please post how you were looked at when applying for a RN position.
  2. by   Debbs
    I graduated from excelsior in 1994, first attempt. My supervisor made snide comments about my "mail order degree". The physician I worked for at the time told me (afer I successfully completed the program) that he understood that the program I had completed was in many ways harder than a traditional program. I agree. I feel that my vast prior experience is what made the difference. I do appreciate the opportunity to have been able to demonstrate my knowledge in that wretched program, or I would not be the Clinical Director in my current position. I would still be training RN's for very litttle compensation

    DebbsRN, former LPN and military trained 91Charlie
  3. by   DJrn
    Debbs, I too am an Army trained 91Charlie. I actually retired from the Army. I completed the NY Regents ADN program in the last couple of years before retiring. My Army experience was the only reason that I passed the program so easily. I would not recommend this program to anyone who does not have substantial nursing experience. I'm clinical coordinator on a Tele. unit. We recently had to let go a Regents new grad. b/c she didn't know what she was doing and after 6 months of work, was still clueless. Its a good program but incompetent people who know how to pass tests are capable of passing this program. I agree, experience is the key.
  4. by   Mkue
    i read somewhere that your state rn license does not show what school you graduated from, only that you have a license to practice in that state. and a license # of course, and picture i think. i believe the lpn license is the same, the school is not listed on your card, just that you are licensed. if anyone knows differently let me know. i don't have a license yet.



    i have 2 sisters who are rn's and they've never been asked what school they went to.
  5. by   Paramedic
    I spoke with the Texas Board of Nursing and they told me that Excelsior is the ONLY long distance learning degree that they will accept and that they only require the clinical experience that the program states in order to sit for the Texas Nursing Boards.

    I have witnessed RN's who have graduated from regular nursing programs and some of them scare me bad!

    Like Nike says, "Just Do It"

    Rick O
  6. by   spongebob1871
    DEBBS,
    What did you do in the army? I'm currently in the navy, and working at a local hospital as a patient care tech(for the experience).
  7. by   Love-A-Nurse
    originally posted by mkue
    i read somewhere that your state rn license does not show what school you graduated from, only that you have a license to practice in that state. and a license # of course, and picture i think. i believe the lpn license is the same, the school is not listed on your card, just that you are licensed. if anyone knows differently let me know. i don't have a license yet.



    i have 2 sisters who are rn's and they've never been asked what school they went to.
    no, it does not show the name of the school you graduated from, that i know of, but the job application ususally does ask about the school you attend.
  8. by   Mkue
    Originally posted by Paramedic
    I spoke with the Texas Board of Nursing and they told me that Excelsior is the ONLY long distance learning degree that they will accept and that they only require the clinical experience that the program states in order to sit for the Texas Nursing Boards.

    I have witnessed RN's who have graduated from regular nursing programs and some of them scare me bad!

    Like Nike says, "Just Do It"

    Rick O
    One of my classmates checked with our state BON and I know that Excelsior is accepted.

    I guess it's the same routine as other schools sending a letter to BON letting them know that you graduated and are able to test.. something like that. Good Luck Rick !
  9. by   liveintheOR
    I graduated from Regents in '99 with an ADN. Before that I worked as an LPN for 7 years--5 on step down from ICU, 2 in surgery. I purchased study guides from The College Network. I
    CLEPed 7 classes -- Micro and 6 Nursing classes. The total cost for me was around $5,000. The most difficult part was the clinical performance test (the 3 day clinical). It cost 1,250.00. It was overseen by very professional nurses who were all MSN. I took my clinicals at Ohio State, and Children's in Columbus, Ohio. It was extremely nerve racking because perfection is expected.
    They leave very little room for error. I think it would be very hard to pass without alot of practical clinical experience. Anyway, I believe it is the only distance learning program for the LPN to RN that is NLN accredited. I had no trouble with the state board. I am sure there were those at work who may have said things behind my back about getting a "mail order" license. I took and passed the same boards as all other RN's in my state. I don't worry about what others say, I let my work speak for itself. I am confident in my abilities as an RN.
    As for those who would group all Regents grads together in one incompetant lump, please don't generalize, as those kind of comments can really come back to bite you in the rear. You may eventually have a supervisor who, without your knowledge, be a Regents grad-- be careful what you say that may be overheard!
    This program is not for everyone. It takes a lot of self discipline and determination. I set a goal of finishing in one year and it took me 11 months to graduate, 13 months until I had my license. I found the folks at Regents very helpful and encouraging. Every time I got a letter from the nursing department it had a handwritten note of encouragement or praise at the bottom of the page. They acted like they really wanted me to succeed, and when I did they were happy for me.
    Sorry to ramble on so long, send me an e-mail if you want more information. mkoonrn@iwon.com
  10. by   christianRN
    Graduated from Regent's last November, passed boards last December, had worked as an LPN before and during my ASN completion. Had to take the CPNE twice, which was beyond EXCRUTIATING, but the feeling of accomplishment when I finally did it was unbelievable. Presently work in ICU, enrolled in a state college for my BSN through their distance ed program. They accepted every last one of my Excelsior credits. This was the right thing for me, I know it's not for everybody. Just as we can't generalize that ALL LPNs, ASNs, BSNs, MDs, etc are good or bad, I"m sure we can't say all Excesior grads are good or bad. Let our individual nursing skills speak for themselves!!!!!
  11. by   Debbs
    Reply to Spongebob.

    A 91C was supposed to be the equivalent to an LPN in the civilian world. Typical duties included venipunctures, medication administration, assessment, wound debridement, simple skin closure. a 91C is like a PA, but with less theoretical training and no nursing dogma, just the facts. When I entered the civilian world, I had to start all over again because my training was not recognized. So I started an LPN program, graduated, then entered Excelsior, challenged the cirriculum in 9 months and waited another 9 months to take the clinical, took the boards the following month and voila! Now I can still do less than I did as a 91C! without that program, I would probably never become an RN, because I have to work full time and a traditional program was not available.

    Deb
  12. by   jude11142
    I am enrolled in Excelsior and it's too soon for me to "judge it", but I have heard mostly positive remarks about their program. I am an LPN going for RN, and you needed to be in the medical field in order to enroll(they have a list of occupations that apply). Several of the nurses that I work with went on the get their BSN through Excelsior and they stated that in no means is it a program to "look down at" as it was difficult at times. There is no way that one can judge "a nurse" based on what school she/he went through. Well enough said, I am looking forward to taking the A&P exam and Micro exam...........wish me luck......

    Bye for now,

    JUDE
  13. by   lliley
    Quote from liveintheOR
    I graduated from Regents in '99 with an ADN. Before that I worked as an LPN for 7 years--5 on step down from ICU, 2 in surgery. I purchased study guides from The College Network. I
    CLEPed 7 classes -- Micro and 6 Nursing classes. The total cost for me was around $5,000. The most difficult part was the clinical performance test (the 3 day clinical). It cost 1,250.00. It was overseen by very professional nurses who were all MSN. I took my clinicals at Ohio State, and Children's in Columbus, Ohio. It was extremely nerve racking because perfection is expected.
    They leave very little room for error. I think it would be very hard to pass without alot of practical clinical experience. Anyway, I believe it is the only distance learning program for the LPN to RN that is NLN accredited. I had no trouble with the state board. I am sure there were those at work who may have said things behind my back about getting a "mail order" license. I took and passed the same boards as all other RN's in my state. I don't worry about what others say, I let my work speak for itself. I am confident in my abilities as an RN.
    As for those who would group all Regents grads together in one incompetant lump, please don't generalize, as those kind of comments can really come back to bite you in the rear. You may eventually have a supervisor who, without your knowledge, be a Regents grad-- be careful what you say that may be overheard!
    This program is not for everyone. It takes a lot of self discipline and determination. I set a goal of finishing in one year and it took me 11 months to graduate, 13 months until I had my license. I found the folks at Regents very helpful and encouraging. Every time I got a letter from the nursing department it had a handwritten note of encouragement or praise at the bottom of the page. They acted like they really wanted me to succeed, and when I did they were happy for me.
    Sorry to ramble on so long, send me an e-mail if you want more information. mkoonrn@iwon.com
    wondering if you have heard anything negative about Excelsior graduates or difficulty passing the NClexx.

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