Racism in the workplace - page 15

Not to be a downer or anything but I have noticed some harsh things said about patients and sometimes even co workers in my unit when they think no one else can hear them. Has anyone else dealt with... Read More

  1. by   Roy Fokker
    Quote from staygold
    Not to get off subject or anything but as an African born in Africa I can tell you that a LARGE number of Africans really don't like to be called black.Also a lot of us don't like the fact that Africans in America not born in Africa call themselves African American.Personally when I was a teenager it bothers me a little sometimes but I'm learning and staying open minded. But don't be surprised if you refer to an African as black and they get upset or indignant.
    Good point.

    But I don't think it detracts from the American PoV.

    Simply put - being called "black" today is nearly not as offensive as it was 40 years ago.


    cheers,
  2. by   madwife2002
    So my question is when we are bringing up our children what do we teach them?
    I for one do not believe that we should ignore somebodies heritage, to do so insults the journeys that have been made through time. I am proud of my culture and where I come from, as we all should be.
    I am bring my dd up to treat all people as equals and that the color of their skin is important as it is part of that person and should be respected. To her at the moment it is very simple, I just wonder when it becomes complecated.
  3. by   staygold
    Quote from Roy Fokker
    Good point.

    But I don't think it detracts from the American PoV.

    Simply put - being called "black" today is nearly not as offensive as it was 40 years ago.


    cheers,
    I was just speaking from what I know.I visited America many times before but I haven't lived here for all that long.The guy who I live with is of African descent but was born in England and raised here read your post and strongly agrees.He broke down the cultural difference for me
    Last edit by Roy Fokker on Aug 29, '06
  4. by   staygold
    Quote from madwife2002
    So my question is when we are bringing up our children what do we teach them?
    I for one do not believe that we should ignore somebodies heritage, to do so insults the journeys that have been made through time. I am proud of my culture and where I come from, as we all should be.
    I am bring my dd up to treat all people as equals and that the color of their skin is important as it is part of that person and should be respected. To her at the moment it is very simple, I just wonder when it becomes complecated.
    There is no one clear right answer only some very distinct wrong ones.You've obviously have chosen several of the former.My family taught me about culture through the arts and sports.Might work for your family too?
  5. by   PeachPie
    While working LTC, I worked with a man who had been in WWII. He was a wonderful old man, but he referred to the Japanese by the typical WWII racial slur. I am half Japanese, but understood that people were not as PC back then. Rather than get defensive about his unintentional faux pas, I playfully pouted and said, "Hmph, it's not the 40's anymore. If you keep calling me a J*p, then I'm going to call you a Big Nosed Foreign Devil like the Japanese did back then." We both laughed, he apologized, and all was good. I miss him. I kinda with I had taken him up on his offer to go joyriding on his electric wheelchair.
  6. by   madwife2002
    Quote from staygold
    There is no one clear right answer only some very distinct wrong ones.You've obviously have chosen several of the former.My family taught me about culture through the arts and sports.Might work for your family too?
    That sounds good I think music is another positive influence. There are some great TV shows too that break down barriers for kids-my dd loves So Raven and the Cheeta Girls. I know they are tacky but they are harmless.

    I have read this thread with interest and I feel that there is rasism in the work place and sad though it is we all have to make a difference however small. Tiny steps is the only way forward. We can all make a huge difference for the future by ensuring our children are educated, informed and grow up caring for other people regardless of colour, sexual preference, culture, religion and size.
    We can all quote articles to validate our arguments until we are 'blue' in the face but in reality we can never use articles to influence the majority of the general public, they need to be educated in real life time.
  7. by   ZASHAGALKA
    “Our Nation Is Moving Toward Two Societies, One Black, One White—Separate and Unequal”

    Executive Summary, Kerner Report - The National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders. 29 Feb 1968.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    Last edit by ZASHAGALKA on Sep 1, '06
  8. by   Rnandsoccermom
    I can say that I feel distressed by the implication that only certain groups of people are considered racist.
    I am a "white" woman who works in a diverse setting of real people. One on one, you learn human beings true nature. I am the only "white" supervisor where I work. Two are "black", two are "Filipino". Both of the administrators are "black". A female security guard is "black". As supervisors we are supposed to carry a walkie-talkie. At the time, none of us were doing it, it was a hassle carrying that and a pager. The security guard wrote me up for not carrying it and no one else. One of the "black" supervisors came to me and told me she spoke to the security guard and the administrator and told both of them it could be considered "racist" to write me up and no one else. She also told me that this particular security guard was telling the administrator that I was a racist. It was not the first time that the only "white" supervisor and sometimes only "white" person in the building was called a racist I found out. She stuck up for me and the matter was dropped.
    I truly admire her because I could've been fired, it is easy to call a "white" person a racist. She has known me for 14 years and knows I have never subscribed to that mentality, at work or at home. I would've done the same for her.
    There are those of you who will say that there must be some part of this story missing. The fact is, she was the only one who ever said this about me. I am well known for being fair, and one of my best work friends is a 62 year old "black" woman who is well respected by everyone. People can't figure our friendship out. But we have the the same mentality, we come to work to work, to care for people, of all colors. Simple but true.

    My point is, there is racism in every race, whether you believe it or not. That does not justify it, but it happens.
    Last edit by Rnandsoccermom on Sep 1, '06
  9. by   tinkerbell218
    I didn't read all the responses, and I hope I'm not bringing up a point someone has already made... BUT as a Black Nurse I often wonder if it's racially motivated or what..that it is often assumed I am a CNA instead of the RN?? I have been a CNA but I have worked hard to get my RN and have no problem correcting any aged person when the assumption is made. In all fairness, I think we all are guilty of being prejudice on some level, but being racist in my opinion takes it to another level. Reguardless idiots are equal opportunity people. I also don't understand how pts will refuse a male RN for OB type care, but yet I haven't heard any OB male MD's complaining of patient decrease due to preference of female OB's????? Racism and other unfairness ( d/t religion, gender, sexual orientation etc..) may not being "fixed" any time soon, but my suggestion would be trying to culturally sensitive and "aware" as possible.
  10. by   sydylo
    I think racism and not wanting a male RN for Ob care are two different things. I don't want a male RN for OB care, I don't want a male MD for OB care either, with all three of my children I had female midwives. I wouldn't have cared what race the midwives were, just as long as they were female. Just a personal preference.
  11. by   LADYFLOWER
    Quote from staygold
    Not to get off subject or anything but as an African born in Africa I can tell you that a LARGE number of Africans really don't like to be called black.Also a lot of us don't like the fact that Africans in America not born in Africa call themselves African American.Personally when I was a teenager it bothers me a little sometimes but I'm learning and staying open minded. But don't be surprised if you refer to an African as black and they get upset or indignant.
    Me and my family call ourselves Black or Black-American! To be honest, I don't hear any other Black people use the term African American in my community, I hear it on T.V. alot. But the term "Black" is more commonly used by people I know.
    also, there are alot of Black people who don't like to be called African-American, so, I kinda see your point. I think we all would agree that either is better than being called "colored" or "n".
    Last edit by LADYFLOWER on Sep 1, '06
  12. by   staygold
    Quote from LADYFLOWER
    Me and my family call ourselves Black or Black-American! To be honest, I don't hear any other Black people use the term African American in my community, I hear it on T.V. alot. But the term "Black" is more commonly used by people I know.
    also, there are alot of Black people who don't like to be called African-American, so, I kinda see your point. I think we all would agree that either is better than being called "colored" or "n".

    Agreed. Black American is my favorite of the alternatives personallyI think it shows pride in being American and pride for having African roots. I mean the last person that called me as an African American assumed I hunted down animals with spears cause I'm from Nigeria. And she was black. :uhoh21:
  13. by   LADYFLOWER
    Quote from staygold
    Agreed. Black American is my favorite of the alternatives personallyI think it shows pride in being American and pride for having African roots. I mean the last person that called me as an African American assumed I hunted down animals with spears cause I'm from Nigeria. And she was black. :uhoh21:
    That's a darn shame!

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