Quick Resume/Job Application Questions

  1. I have worked for the same place as an RN for the past 12 years. I have worked as an RN on 2 different units and a house supervisor. Do I treat these as 3 separate jobs on a job application or resume? Should I lump them all together? For a couple of years I worked the house supervisor role concurrently with my staff nurse role. This is the only place I have worked since graduation and am not sure how to approach these different roles on a new job application for a different hospital. Honestly, I am not sure of the years in each position. Also, my hospital was bought by another hospital group a few years ago. Do I separate out when the new hospital group took over on my resume?
    Any guidance would be greatly appreciated.
    Thank you.
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   Kymmi
    I dont know if there is a right or wrong way to do it...but if it was me I'd probably list it as one place of employment but then where it gives you the ability to describe your job description I'd list : Staff nurse--XXX years, Supervisior--XXX years, etc etc etc.
  4. by   caliotter3
    Believe it or not, in one of those 'how to do a resume' books, I saw this very situation addressed. Of course, I can't tell you which book, there are so many at the bookstore. I do remember, however, that it was stated to take each position, with its different dates, responsibilities, accomplishments, etc., and give it its own paragraph, so to speak. Also, I worked for a place that was bought out and changed names. I listed it by the name it was using when I left the job. What I find really frustrating, is when you are asked to provide the names of past supervisors for references. Then, when you are contacted again by the prospective employer, they want to give you the twice over b/c somebody decided at some point in time to move on. As if I socialize with these people and keep up with anybody. Nobody bothers to keep up with me! Ha, ha! I don't call former employers on a weekly basis to find out if so and so is still there or whether or not so and so finally got her divorce, etc., etc. Like a former co-worker from way back said one time, "I don't look back."
  5. by   mauxtav8r
    This is my husband's situation exactly. Over 20 years without a change in employer, but his division was bought out, he's changed locations and job descriptions multiple times as he's moved on in his career.

    This is how he handles it: On the resume, put a header reflecting your job title, followed by the employer, then dates (as best you can remember). Then he describes his main accomplishments in that position. Jobs are listed in order from most recent back. If you have a long work history, the earlier jobs can be a one-liner.

    As an example:

    "CHIEF NURSING OFFICER, ABC Hospital, Inc. (formerly XYZ Hospitals), Santa Monica Headquarters, 2003 to present. Oversaw all leadership and directive aspects of nursing care in 50,000 bed hospital with operating budget of $2 billion annually. All JCAHO inspections passed during my tenure.

    FLOOR NURSING SUPERVISOR, XYZ Hospitals (now known as ABC Hospital, Inc.), San Bernardino Hospital, 2001 to 2003. Supervised nursing and support staff on medical-surgical floor with 80 beds. Patient satisfaction scores and quality scores consistently in the highest 2% of XYZ Hospitals system.

    FLOOR NURSE, XYZ Hospitals (now known as ABC Hospital, Inc.), Simi Valley Community Health Services, 1997 to 2001. Performed patient care, staff training, and supervision of support staff for medical-surgical patients."

    About the dates, we usually use years only rather than getting too much into the detail. Frankly, if you don't remember it, no one else will either.

    Try to show your progress from job to job. This will avoid the trap of looking like a job-hopper if you have a real reason for changing jobs.

    I hope this helps you. Excuse the exaggeration for effect.
  6. by   NRSKarenRN
    Quote from mauxtav8r
    This is my husband's situation exactly. Over 20 years without a change in employer, but his division was bought out, he's changed locations and job descriptions multiple times as he's moved on in his career.

    This is how he handles it: On the resume, put a header reflecting your job title, followed by the employer, then dates (as best you can remember). Then he describes his main accomplishments in that position. Jobs are listed in order from most recent back. If you have a long work history, the earlier jobs can be a one-liner.

    As an example:

    "CHIEF NURSING OFFICER, ABC Hospital, Inc. (formerly XYZ Hospitals), Santa Monica Headquarters, 2003 to present. Oversaw all leadership and directive aspects of nursing care in 50,000 bed hospital with operating budget of $2 billion annually. All JCAHO inspections passed during my tenure.

    FLOOR NURSING SUPERVISOR, XYZ Hospitals (now known as ABC Hospital, Inc.), San Bernardino Hospital, 2001 to 2003. Supervised nursing and support staff on medical-surgical floor with 80 beds. Patient satisfaction scores and quality scores consistently in the highest 2% of XYZ Hospitals system.

    FLOOR NURSE, XYZ Hospitals (now known as ABC Hospital, Inc.), Simi Valley Community Health Services, 1997 to 2001. Performed patient care, staff training, and supervision of support staff for medical-surgical patients."

    About the dates, we usually use years only rather than getting too much into the detail. Frankly, if you don't remember it, no one else will either.

    Try to show your progress from job to job. This will avoid the trap of looking like a job-hopper if you have a real reason for changing jobs.

    I hope this helps you. Excuse the exaggeration for effect.

    :yeahthat:


    Hints here: Wondering why you can't get hired or promoted: Resume + Interview hints!
  7. by   Tweety
    Thanks so much for asking this question. I had the same question because I'm about to make a resume myself and have been at the same place for 14 years, but on different units.

    Thanks to those who answered. mauxtav8r, good post, thanks for taking the time.

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