public availability of nurses address'

  1. The government in the UK are proposing that the a register of the private addresses and telephone numbers of nurses be made available for access by the general public. The argument is one of accountability and access. Nurses have concerns around privacy and safety, and the nursing press are running a campaign around the fear of 'stalkers'. As some states already have this, I would like to hear from nurses about any percieved pro's and con's of having such a system in place. Has anyone been or known of patients or their families using this route of gaining access to personal details? or are the British nurses over reacting? What safe guards do you have in place?
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   OBNURSEHEATHER
    This is terrible! When I go home at 3:30 my work is DONE! I don't want to be contacted at home by a former patient about something they feel I need to be "accountable" for. If you have an issue with my nursing care, I will be glad to get my supervisor for you, but the day patients are contacting me at home is the day I'll quit nursing.

    You know, not to say it couldn't be in any other area, but this could be a serious safety issue with nurses in the psychiatric setting. But really anywhere, you could state a case for it being unsafe.

    This is just another example of how badly nurses are treated. In no other profession would you see this.

    Gee, I'm really upset that the Red Wings didn't win the Stanley Cup. I think they should be accountable to ME for that. Anyone have their phone numbers so I can contact them?

    Ya Right
    Heather
  4. by   Stargazer
    princessangel, I don't see any pros, but I see a lot of cons. First of all, is it just nurses being targeted for this? What about physicians, respiratory therapists, radiology technicians, anyone with direct pt care? What about other professions? Are they going to publish the personal info of the cop who didn't catch the guy who mugs you and the firefighter who couldn't save your house from burning down? What about the CEO of the company who owns the store where you got rude service?

    The fact is, the majority of nurses are women, many of whom live alone. This is an open invitation to every freak, serial killer/rapist, nut job, and family-member-stuck-in-the-"anger"-stage-of-the-grieving-process out there.

    You are already accountable for what you do due to the fact that you are a licensed practitioner. Anyone who has an issue with your care can find you AT WORK to discuss it with you and/or your supervisor.

    You are NOT overreacting. You have every right to be terrified, because your personal safety is at stake, not to mention deeply offended, because it sounds like nurses are being singled out. PLEASE don't take this lying down. Stand up and fight for your safety and privacy. Let us know what happens.
  5. by   psnurse
    Kick, scream, or use whatever means necessary to keep your private information private.

    A couple of phone calls at home from former patients was all the convincing I needed to wear tape over my last name on my name tag.

    If someone has an issue with my nursing care, my name is in the chart and they can address it through the proper channels.
  6. by   HazeK
    <If someone has an issue with my nursing care, my name is in the chart and they can address it through the proper channels.>
    AMEN!!!

    Nursing is a PROFESSION...if someone has a compliment or complaint about the care received at my hand, I want to be addressed on it, AT my place of employment, through appropriate channels.!

    The thought of posting names, addressses & phone numbers is absurd!
    <this could be a serious safety issue> is an understatement!
  7. by   donmurray
    Here in the U.K. we are almost relieved that our governmemt seems to have backed off on this. They issued a draft document on changing the legal framework to allow the setting up of a new nursing regulatory body which will keep the register of qualified nurses The clause in the draft legislation is still in there, but the Chief Nursing Officer has "clarified" that the new nursing regulatory body will have the decision of how much information may be released from the register. This is an improvement, but leaves the possibility open for the future that all someones' details may be made public so long as that clause still exists in the law.
  8. by   super nurse 2
    this happened to me when a disgruntled alcoholic pt. found out where i lived and where my children went to school. i was doing home visits with his wife and newborn daughter and he was angry about the info she was divulging to me. he never actually threatened to harm me, but was very intimidating. i told my supervisor, but she was no help. because of my findings i contacted CPS and filed a 51A (child neglect). the children were temporarily placed in foster care.

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