Pregnant and new job - page 2

I've scoured the internet for advice on this and have asked some close friends but I am still not sure what to do. I was recruited for an ICU position at a different hospital than I am currently... Read More

  1. by   Cococure
    Quote from dstee009
    you need to tell the new job that offered you icu position. they probably arent looking to train someone who will then turn around and take at least 3 months off. Its pretty selfish on your part to even think that would be ok. to dump the extra responsibility on the unit of having to cover for 3 months that you are brand new to isnt ok either. Stay at your current job until you can make a real commitment ....
    Please please don't listen to this person. The nursing workforce is predominantly made up of women and guess what..women have babies. Dont assume you are dumping any responsibility onto anyone. I like you started working while I was preggo...4 months to be exact and you know what..they were happy and excited for me! Also please don't short change yourself on your maternity leave if you can take more do if you can't then take 6-8 weeks. As you will see many women will have babies and return to work and guess what we move up into management as well ...who would have guessed!!

    Congrats and good luck on your new job. As others have stated you should tell because of the safety of the baby
  2. by   Cinqly
    Removed since op has received answer they were looking for
    Last edit by Cinqly on Aug 8
  3. by   Orca
    Quote from R5RN
    I have already reviewed their maternity and FMLA leaves and have no concerns in that regard, but thank you.
    You changed employers. You don't qualify for FMLA until you have been with an employer for a year.
  4. by   matcha-cat
    Quote from Cococure
    Please please don't listen to this person. The nursing workforce is predominantly made up of women and guess what..women have babies. Dont assume you are dumping any responsibility onto anyone. I like you started working while I was preggo...4 months to be exact and you know what..they were happy and excited for me! Also please don't short change yourself on your maternity leave if you can take more do if you can't then take 6-8 weeks. As you will see many women will have babies and return to work and guess what we move up into management as well ...who would have guessed!!

    Congrats and good luck on your new job. As others have stated you should tell because of the safety of the baby
    Right? I read somewhere that the nursing position is 90% women, and like somebody else said, when you're hiring lots of young women, babies are going to happen. Are women not allowed to have babies while working? What a terrible comment, shaming the OP and everything.
  5. by   MassNurse24
    Quote from dstee009
    you need to tell the new job that offered you icu position. they probably arent looking to train someone who will then turn around and take at least 3 months off. Its pretty selfish on your part to even think that would be ok. to dump the extra responsibility on the unit of having to cover for 3 months that you are brand new to isnt ok either. Stay at your current job until you can make a real commitment to the new job.

    they cant fire you for being pregnant but they also dont have to hire you either. its pretty shady to hide it to secure a position.
    Wow I really can't believe you are talking to another human this way. She is carrying a child, and yes while she is going to need some time off when the baby is born it doesn't mean she can't get a new job! In my opinion, I would tell your employer as soon as possible to protect the baby (isolation rooms, heavy lifting, etc.) and don't ever let anyone make you feel ashamed! Good luck!
  6. by   Jolie
    Quote from Orca
    You changed employers. You don't qualify for FMLA until you have been with an employer for a year.
    The OP indicated that she works for this employer in another location, so this job change is considered a transfer, not new employment.

    Even if it was an outright job change and new employer, that would not necessarily rule out some job protection at the time of delivery, depending on employer policy.

    FMLA requires certain employers to provide up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave for employees with at least 1 year and 1000 hours of service. That is the bare minimum. There are employers who offer more generous protection, such as extending FMLA to employees with less seniority than noted above, or allowing leave times longer than 12 weeks. That's why it is important to understand one's own employer's policy, which may differ substantially from the minimal required by federal law.

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