Positive Aspects of Nursing?

  1. 0
    Hi all,

    I'm new to the board. So let me just take a second to introduce myself. I am a BSN student, getting ready to graduate in May. I also work as a nurse tech. Until recently, I had this nice little career path. A couple of years in the ICU, then off to anesthesia school! I have recently found myself dreading going to work, and dreading graduation. I have recently began 12 hour clinicals, and hate being away from my husband that long. Between going to bed early and coming home exhausted, I feel like I have no time for the two of us. I cannot imagine doing that all week! I read the horror stories of new grads being overwhelmed with all of the responsibility and hating their jobs. Can someone remind me why I chose this profession? I love caring for others but is this really worth it? I already feel burned out, and I have not even begun!
  2. 17 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    Quote from LaurenRNn08
    Hi all,

    I'm new to the board. So let me just take a second to introduce myself. I am a BSN student, getting ready to graduate in May. I also work as a nurse tech. Until recently, I had this nice little career path. A couple of years in the ICU, then off to anesthesia school! I have recently found myself dreading going to work, and dreading graduation. I have recently began 12 hour clinicals, and hate being away from my husband that long. Between going to bed early and coming home exhausted, I feel like I have no time for the two of us. I cannot imagine doing that all week! I read the horror stories of new grads being overwhelmed with all of the responsibility and hating their jobs. Can someone remind me why I chose this profession? I love caring for others but is this really worth it? I already feel burned out, and I have not even begun!
    I am also due to graduate in May and can not wait to take the NCLEX to earn my hard-earned license.

    It seems to me that you had this nice little career mapped out for yourself. I also had one. I would get my RN, go back and get a Masters and become a Nurse Practitioner within a short period of time.

    Many of my classmates are focused on getting into a particular unit (surprise--most want to go to the ICU), but I am taking the advice of every RN that I have worked with since starting my med/surg clinicals. Going directly to ICU actually limits you if you later decide to move elsewhere.

    I still have my general career mapped out and it has not changed, but I am taking the advice of seasoned professionals. I plan to work med/surg for a couple of years to develop a practice that I feel secure in. This will give me time to get that physical assessment down, see things that I may never see otherwise, and learn how to deal with MDs.m The result will be that I will have more confidence in myself and be ready to transfer to any other setting that I choose to go to.

    I have never felt that I do not want to go to clinical or that I have chosen the wrong career. If you feel that going to clinical is too much of a hardship and that the hours are disagreeable, then nursing may not be for you. Caring for clients is a privilege and you do not mention them at all in your post--your concerns are only about you.

    If you came to nursing to make money, then there is money to make. But if you don't care about the people you are taking care of, then do the rest of us new nurses a favor...don't clog up the job market.

    I'm sorry to sound harsh, but that's the truth.
  4. 0
    Quote from LaurenRNn08
    Hi all,

    I'm new to the board. So let me just take a second to introduce myself. I am a BSN student, getting ready to graduate in May. I also work as a nurse tech. Until recently, I had this nice little career path. A couple of years in the ICU, then off to anesthesia school! I have recently found myself dreading going to work, and dreading graduation. I have recently began 12 hour clinicals, and hate being away from my husband that long. Between going to bed early and coming home exhausted, I feel like I have no time for the two of us. I cannot imagine doing that all week! I read the horror stories of new grads being overwhelmed with all of the responsibility and hating their jobs. Can someone remind me why I chose this profession? I love caring for others but is this really worth it? I already feel burned out, and I have not even begun!
    I am also due to graduate in May and can not wait to take the NCLEX to earn my hard-earned license.

    It seems to me that you had this nice little career mapped out for yourself. I also had one. I would get my RN, go back and get a Masters and become a Nurse Practitioner within a short period of time.

    Many of my classmates are focused on getting into a particular unit (surprise--most want to go to the ICU), but I am taking the advice of every RN that I have worked with since starting my med/surg clinicals. Going directly to ICU actually limits you if you later decide to move elsewhere.

    I still have my general career mapped out and it has not changed, but I am taking the advice of seasoned professionals. I plan to work med/surg for a couple of years to develop a practice that I feel secure in. This will give me time to get that physical assessment down, see things that I may never see otherwise, and learn how to deal with MDs.m The result will be that I will have more confidence in myself and be ready to transfer to any other setting that I choose to go to.

    I have never felt that I do not want to go to clinical or that I have chosen the wrong career. If you feel that going to clinical is too much of a hardship and that the hours are disagreeable, then nursing may not be for you. Caring for clients is a privilege and you do not mention them at all in your post--your concerns are only about you.

    If you came to nursing to make money, then there is money to make. But if you don't care about the people you are taking care of, then do the rest of us new nurses a favor...don't clog up the job market.

    I'm sorry to sound harsh, but that's the truth.
  5. 0
    I would like to add one other point...

    The reason that you hear many new nurses complain about thier positions is because they sign on with employers without investigating thier options. It is very tempting when you are broke to sign on with anyone that is willing to offer you money.

    When you do this, then you stand a high probability of getting placed where they need you instead of where you want to go.

    If you are due to graduate in May, then you should have started looking at potential employers at least 6 months ago and determining what facility will be a good fit for you in general, including the expected shifts.
  6. 2
    Quote from LaurenRNn08
    Hi all,

    I'm new to the board. So let me just take a second to introduce myself. I am a BSN student, getting ready to graduate in May. I also work as a nurse tech. Until recently, I had this nice little career path. A couple of years in the ICU, then off to anesthesia school! I have recently found myself dreading going to work, and dreading graduation. I have recently began 12 hour clinicals, and hate being away from my husband that long. Between going to bed early and coming home exhausted, I feel like I have no time for the two of us. I cannot imagine doing that all week! I read the horror stories of new grads being overwhelmed with all of the responsibility and hating their jobs. Can someone remind me why I chose this profession? I love caring for others but is this really worth it? I already feel burned out, and I have not even begun!
    What you are experiencing right now is as stressful as anything coming ahead for you in the future. That you are feeling overwhelmed and second-guessing your decision is completely normal. Perhaps you have already gone through your "honeymoon" period in nursing. I know for me that didn't hit until after a few months on the first job. I believe most of the nurses I know went through a similar experience.

    Nursing is facing humanity at its very worst and its very best. You will hate and you will love it. I think that nursing can be equated to life itself with all the tragedies and victories. It is not for the faint hearted. The question is: can YOU maintain your humanity and compassion? It is about relationship and connection. Whatever you hold dear and what makes the rest of your life meaningful, you will bring to your job. Is it one of the hardest things you will ever do? Probably. Is it worth it? Absolutely.

    Go forth informed. Decide every day that you are going to make a difference; that you will make at least one connection that will heal and will make it all worth it. That kind of connection will also feed your soul and allow to be the kind of wife (and mother?) and friend that you have the potential to be. Use nursing as a way to enrich everyone around you.

    If CRNA school is your goal, that's great, but don't miss the profound opportunity along the way. Take it one day at a time. Don't miss out.
    Shift your focus and it will all change for you!! I promise.
    BeachyRNn08 and Penny8611 like this.
  7. 2
    How sweet. that you miss your husband during the 12 hours. I work 36-44 hours weekly, typically back to back I also have 3 kids, and a pseudo-hubby when I am at work, I am at work. I do not have the time, nor the energy to worry about home and what is going on there. I leave before any are up, and I am at home by 8pm, exhausted ready for my shower, dinner and bed, only to be up at 450am the next day. I do not get to visit too much etc when I get home, cause I am TIRED, and some days at work I spew so much verbal vomit that I really don't want to talk when I am home. That is nursing, now I do like my job, and some days I really am challenged and I love it. The first 2 years of nursing were very difficult, learning etc. Constantly feeling like I didn't know enuff, that I screwed up etc. This is normal. As far as missing your family...I can't help you there. See I go to work for my family, tho I miss them I must work to help provide them with a better life. These are the sacrifices one must make when they grow up. On the flip side, i am off 3-4 days in a row, and can catch up on what I missed during my time at work. Good luck.
    TaylorMade and BeachyRNn08 like this.
  8. 0
    Quote from JediWitch

    I have never felt that I do not want to go to clinical or that I have chosen the wrong career. If you feel that going to clinical is too much of a hardship and that the hours are disagreeable, then nursing may not be for you. Caring for clients is a privilege and you do not mention them at all in your post--your concerns are only about you.

    If you came to nursing to make money, then there is money to make. But if you don't care about the people you are taking care of, then do the rest of us new nurses a favor...don't clog up the job market.

    I'm sorry to sound harsh, but that's the truth.
    I appreciate your honesty. However, I would just like to clarify that I did state in my first post that I do enjoy caring for others. I'm sorry that you got the impression that it's "all about me." However, if I did not care for the client, then I would definitely not be in this profession! I appreciate your advice, but I do not believe that everyone has to stick to the same old path that you have to go to med/surg for one year before doing anything else.
  9. 1
    I also think the advice to start in med/surg is sound advice (maybe I'll change my mind later). You get exposed to the management of all types of diagnoses, and lay a good foundation of nursing skills, thereby making yourself competitive for other jobs.

    That said, I hear med/surg is tough - like working in the Hell's Kitchen of nursing. High burnout, high stress.

    BUT, again, I suppose it depends on which unit you end up in. There may be some med/surg units with good ratios and supportive nurses.

    One thing I'd warn against is taking a job with a "great" sign-on bonus. For me, a big sign-on bonus is a big red flag that something is awry in that unit. Something must be up with that unit, that they would need to persuade nurses in that way.
    BeachyRNn08 likes this.
  10. 2
    Talk about clinicals, one of the CRNAs I spoke with had to do 2000 cases before graduation. I thought I heard wrong and asked "hours?" and she said "no, cases." And she was paying for the privilege of doing those 2000 cases. So as with RN schooling, it all comes down to your level of motivation. Do you want it badly enough to do whatever it takes to get there? If so, you'll get there!
    BeachyRNn08 and Altra like this.
  11. 2
    If CRNA is your goal, then stick with the ICU position. Nursing is very demanding in almost any setting. However bad the 12 hr shifts are, think about the fact that unless you are a workaholic like myself who signs up for 5 12's per week, you can enjoy having 4 days off to spend with your loved ones each week.

    As far as working in Med-Surg first I respectfully disagree with marie-francoise, I know many great nurses that have never set foot in med-surg, who I would entrust my life with anytime. I personally consider myself a good nurse and never worked in a hospital med-surg floor setting.

    Whatever you decide to do, don't give up too quickly, nursing can be very rewarding, give yourself a chance to explore it.
    BeachyRNn08 and deeDawntee like this.


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