Policy on IV tubing/bag change? - page 3

I'm in a new unit and their policy on changing iv tubing/bags is different from where I worked. I looked up CDC guidelines (actually googled it and got sent to another site but it seems legit) and... Read More

  1. by   climberrn
    It's interesting that both hospitals I worked at before this one did the same thing and it's different from the majority of your responses. Huh.

    And I'm the same way about labeling stuff...we have a new ICU staff and it drives me batty to have 6 stopcocks worth of meds going into the patient and not one of them is labeled. Gotta start training them!
  2. by   miko014
    Quote from climberrn
    And I'm the same way about labeling stuff...we have a new ICU staff and it drives me batty to have 6 stopcocks worth of meds going into the patient and not one of them is labeled. Gotta start training them!
    Drives me nuts too! If I don't know when it's from, I have to change it! We don't have different colored labels for the days of the week (though the other large hospital in the area does - but when I was there, I can tell you that I NEVER saw them on the bags/tubing...maybe 20% of the stuff was dated). We just have bright pink labels that we write date, time, and initials on.
  3. by   augigi
    CDC guidelines on changes:
    Erratum: Vol. 51, No. RR-10
  4. by   kukukajoo
    We went over this in depth a couple weeks ago. The guidelines say NO MORE FREQUENTLY than every 72 and can go longer except when certain
    meds admin such as blood, lipids, TPN, etc.

    There was a study done and I can't find it to save my life! Just read it too- but anyhow it was saying that they found less frequent changes actually reduced infections and includes the hardware. Was an interesting study and surprised me but every change is a risk of contamination I suppose. The study also mentioned less risk of infections with the new silver coated antibacterial lines and same for foleys.
  5. by   miko014
    Quote from kukukajoo
    ...they found less frequent changes actually reduced infections
    Makes sense, if you think about it. There's not much risk of contamination just switiching the spike from one bag to another, but every time you touch that port (the actual IV site, I mean), it's one more chance for bacteria to get in there. ...I don't know if I'm saying that right. You know what I mean? It's much more "hands on" to change the tubing and all than it is to just change the bag. I hope that makes sense!
  6. by   climberrn
    Quote from augigi
    CDC guidelines on changes:
    Erratum: Vol. 51, No. RR-10
    I could kiss you!!!!
  7. by   LilRedRN1973
    We change our IV tubing Q 96h, actual peripheral IV can stay in for 96h, TPN gets new tubing and filter Q 24h, and propofol is changed Q 12h. I guess we are one of the only facilities that wait so long in between tubing changes?

    Melanie = )

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