Pity Floating CNA's :-( - page 2

Now, with my unit closed w/low census, I float and sit constantly. It's getting harder for me to sit still all day, but I am not complaining since it is important work none the less. The... Read More

  1. by   hapeewendy
    Mario *short A sound, Big big heart*
    dont worry about these goofs...people ignore other staff all the time ,and its so stupid! I have learned that a sitter can save your Asssssssssssss
    in a pinch when they are the only ones that a patient will listen to, or just to come and grab you when they feel something isnt right with the patient they are watching.

    you go to work and do your thing and leave with the peace of mind that you did what you were supposed to do, and probably more than that, and hold your head up high knowing that you would never ignore a fellow collegue whether they be the head of the hospital or someone in housekeeping!

    and as for the dumbass who made fun of your name, how did he want to say it ? Mahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhrio?
    Mario is Mario period
    and I kinda really like him that way!
    cheers
  2. by   live4today
    Originally posted by sharann
    Poor Mario (with the short a sound). Sounds like you work with a few folks lacking in the common courtesy and manners department. Hang in there, but speak up gently if they do this. "Hi, I'm Mario, I usually work in xyz dept, but they heard you guys needed a sitter badly...." Good luck. Focus on school as well, you'll be a great nurse when you finish.
    EXCELLENT ADVICE, sharann! Superbly spoken!
  3. by   Rustyhammer
    I have done my time as a sitter. It was a long time ago but it left an impression on me. I feel for you but it's not forever...just seems like it.
    I was going to recommend drinking heavily but thats not really good advice is it.
    Study hard and remain friendly. It will rub off on the others.
    -Russell
  4. by   Rustyhammer
    Mario,
    what is the hard H sound?
  5. by   disher
    Worked one day on a floor where every nurse completely ignored me. While I was helping an occupational therapist apply new hand splints to one of my patients I complimented here on the good job she did of making the splints. She replied, Your not from here are you? I said, No how did you know? She said Because your the first person who has spoken to me in the 6 months..... 6 months of being ignored...what an unhealthy working envirnoment!! I went to human resources right after the shift and told I thought the moral problem was the lowest I'd ever seen and would wait tables before I ever worked in that environment again.
  6. by   mario_ragucci
    Today, for the first time, I got called into a room by the male charge nurse, of another unit, at another place, as a sitter. No one can pull my lever, but I apparently pulled V's when I asked V not to speak behind my back. Cursed with the hearing of Jammie Sommers, I heard V say something or other about me not doing something I should have. From a distance, I chimed in she shouldn't talk about me. The male charge nurse didn't take up or put down anyone.

    I have read and will re-read again all of the things yall have said and i love you for sharing experiences with me. All I have read is important interaction that helps us/me so much, and i love you. Sorry. :-)

    When folks ignore me, it does throw me off. I have to gain immunity to such preceived personality anomilies, and generate my own positive plasma wave. Body language is another story, as I will turn my back on some folks who don't do a minimal greet. My heart rate increases, and my blood pressure is elevated. I'm grinning at this as I type it.
  7. by   micro


    if it wasn't for sitters.....that have to be at all times vigilant for any and all things that a confused patient might do to injure themselves.......

    nurses would be pulling their turning grey hair out.......

    tonight.....we(any of us) got offered and begged to stay over into a double shift to sit.....and even with the offer of callin pay.....

    no takers......we all just chuckled......

    Mario, "sitting is vital" and a part of this crazy health care field we do daily. Don't let the attitudes take you down, you just lift those people right up or "blow them off", because we are all in this "thing" together.....

    and as with all else said here, remember....time moves on.....
    this too shall pass

    and census will be back up soon.........:spin:

    micro and out
  8. by   susanmary
    Mario -- you make some valid points about common courtesy. I can't imagine NOT introducing myself when I enter a room. Every member of the health care TEAM (and I emphasize the word TEAM) is essential. Whenever I work with a float PCA or sitter, the first thing I do is introduce myself and try to give them a quick run-down of the unit and assignment. I will make sure they get coverage for a break -- & I introduce them to staff.

    My biggest pet peeve is when doctors barge into patient's rooms without introducing themselves, explain what they are doing. Common courtesy should be a no-brainer. Wonder why more people don't practice it.

    As for the staff member talking behind your back -- good for you for calling her on it. If she had an issue with something you did, then she should have spoken WITH you in private. Again, common courtesy.

    Anyway, have a good weekend.
  9. by   mario_ragucci
    Thank you susanmary,
    Luckily, this bad stuff happened during a float to tramu/icu unit at another hospital, and my normal unit is back up and running again.
    Every person is unique, but we all make up a hospital staff. If there is one thing that makes me feel comfortable in new surroundings, its talking to people.
    There are sordid nurses out there, and, boy oh boy, they try hard to make everyone miserable.
  10. by   Sleepyeyes
    ((((Mario))))) hang in there.

    I LOVE it when my pt.'s have sitters. Plus, you learn a lot about their conditions if they have a nurse like me, 'cause i'm happy to tell ya alllllllll about it. :chuckle

    You've just been hooked up to the wrong nurses. It'll get better, I assure you.



    Don't let 'em run all over ya....
    Last edit by Sleepyeyes on Jun 15, '02
  11. by   SOCRATES SOUL
    Originally posted by disher
    Worked one day on a floor where every nurse completely ignored me. While I was helping an occupational therapist apply new hand splints to one of my patients I complimented here on the good job she did of making the splints. She replied, Your not from here are you? I said, No how did you know? She said Because your the first person who has spoken to me in the 6 months..... 6 months of being ignored...what an unhealthy working envirnoment!! I went to human resources right after the shift and told I thought the moral problem was the lowest I'd ever seen and would wait tables before I ever worked in that environment again.

    That is shocking disher I really must say, what pitiful moral......How can people work like that?? Surely their pathetic woeful attitudes would have been reflected in the patient care (or what may have been their idea of patient care...)......

    To not liase with allied healthcare workers like OT? What more can I say, a misery pit like that I would NOT have been able to handle and most certainly would have said the same thing you did....... ....Power to you!

    And YES people, what about those people that cant say a simple 'G'day'......are their lives really that miserable?....or those fools that know you but just cant be bothered acknowledging you?......isnt it harder to ignore someone that simply smile and say G'day in passing?...... .........They must flatter themselves really, thinking that one must want to stop and chat to them about every intimate detailn in their lives at that precise moment.......:chuckle .....

    I dance to the beat of my own drum......Feel my rhythm....
  12. by   mattsmom81
    OK, Mario ya ain't gonna like this but I'll say it anyhow.

    CNA's are expected to float...the care they provide is generic. As a nurse, some floating will probably be required as well so get used to it.

    And you might want to ask yourself, Mario, why these nurses don't care for you....you do tend to comment a lot on things you know very little about and you have been called on it on this board several times....just a thought.

    Nurses do not like a CNA who thinks they know more than a nurse....and you should not be correcting them on introducing themselves, etc, common courtesy...believe me, correcting them will NOT endear you to them.

    Bad apples are everywhere. Do your job, and you will do fine.

    I do NOT mean this in a 'mean or a young eating way', it is constructive criticism meant to help you blend in a little as part of a team. I have had this talk with quite a few CNA's on my units over the years with similar problems and complaints....their attitudes and behaviors DID play a role....Good luck to you.
  13. by   Sleepyeyes
    Originally posted by mattsmom81

    And you might want to ask yourself, Mario, why these nurses don't care for you....you do tend to comment a lot on things you know very little about and you have been called on it on this board several times....just a thought.
    ...
    I do NOT mean this in a 'mean or a young eating way', it is constructive criticism meant to help you blend in a little as part of a team.
    Gosh, mattsmom....sure coulda fooled me!
    I so would rather have a CNA who asks questions and tries to take an active role in pt care rather than someone who curls up in a blanket in a chair and just stares at the patient while the pt. pulls the Foley out with his teeth. With some sitters, I've kinda been tempted to do vitals on THEM..... :chuckle

    Yes, it's true Mario's been "called on it" --but in a loving way...

    Actually, I have kids his age, and I think my motherly stuff is kicking in, in addition to the fact that I've endured some very toxic environments in the past. (I was a CNA for about 12 years.) And some environments are just plain toxic to that particular person, not necessarily to everyone. But if you're stuck in it... it tends to affect you in the long run.

    I believe that's partly why, when our supervisor took us all out to breakfast, I found myself crying with relief on the way to the restaurant. (The other reason I is, I get all maudlin and weepy and sentimental when I'm sick--and I didn't know it, but I was just starting this bronchial pneumonia thing... )

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