Pick up Malpractice! They went after my license. - page 7

www.nso.com A few months ago I was unjustly fired after a resident died, after my shift, and after she had been released from the emergency room. She had trouble swallowing something at lunch... Read More

  1. by   SuesquatchRN
    Oh, the unit clerk was there the whole time, and knew when I was where and who was doing what and how the patient was.
  2. by   SuesquatchRN
    Oh, and if someone is released from the ER and dies within 24 hours there's an automatic investigation so the state was in STAT to question everyone - except me. Me, they fired.
  3. by   Chaya
    I too would never be without my malpractice insurance (which reminds, me-must send in my renewal check ASAP). However, I have had no personal experience with their services and know of no-one else who has. I would like to hear from anyone out there who has needed to use their services. No company name or specifics need be mentioned- I just would like to know if they in fact did honor their claims to protect YOUR interests or did you get the run-around when the chips were down?
  4. by   ernurse4ill
    Sue I am sorry that you had to go through what you did, but thank you for posting this. I, like many others, have always been told not to carry my own insurance. After reading through the last 9 pages, I called today and got my own. I have mine through State Farm. It is a rider policy on my homeowners. It is costing me $37 per year for $500,000 coverage. My question for all of you is this..... do you believe this is enough coverage?
  5. by   Sheri257
    Quote from ernurse4ill
    I have mine through State Farm. It is a rider policy on my homeowners. It is costing me $37 per year for $500,000 coverage. My question for all of you is this..... do you believe this is enough coverage?
    NSO's standard policy for most states is $6 million in coverage for about $100, give or take so ...

    I don't know if that means $500,000 is not enough but, why not go for $6 million since it's so cheap?

    :typing
  6. by   elkpark
    Clarification on limits of coverage: Most policies include two figures, a "per incident" number and an "aggregate" number, e.g., $1M per incident/$6M aggregate. That means you are covered for up to $1 million per incident up to a maximum of $6 million per year. Even if you are covered for a maximum of $6M for the year, you would not be covered for more than $1M in any single occurrence (in my example -- fill in your own numbers from your own policy!)
  7. by   pagandeva2000
    Those freaking animals!!! Did that other nurse have a grudge against you? It makes me wonder why else would something like this happen. I mean, the woman stated to you that she didn't need help...what else were you supposed to do? Especially if the patient was responsive...I don't see a reason to suction a responsive patient...do you?? Thank goodness for the unit clerk. Also, does 'DIL' mean daughter in law? Maybe she wanted to cover her family member and leave you out there. Did you get your letter of reference?
  8. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from ernurse4ill
    Sue I am sorry that you had to go through what you did, but thank you for posting this. I, like many others, have always been told not to carry my own insurance. After reading through the last 9 pages, I called today and got my own. I have mine through State Farm. It is a rider policy on my homeowners. It is costing me $37 per year for $500,000 coverage. My question for all of you is this..... do you believe this is enough coverage?
    I didn't know that State Farm Insurance had malpractice insurance for nurses. It seems to be cheaper to pay though them than NSO. I will inquire. I already use them for homeowner insurance. Can't say whether it is enough, but will inquire about that as well. Also, I want to know if you are cleared or charges, or are guilty, but retained or renewed your license, does the insurance for you go up? Anyone know?
  9. by   deleern
    that is [font='trebuchet ms'][font='trebuchet ms'] absolutely correct. the only you and your insurance co. know unless you advertise it yourself... ( i used to sell insurance)
  10. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    Those freaking animals!!! Did that other nurse have a grudge against you? It makes me wonder why else would something like this happen. I mean, the woman stated to you that she didn't need help...what else were you supposed to do? Especially if the patient was responsive...I don't see a reason to suction a responsive patient...do you?? Thank goodness for the unit clerk. Also, does 'DIL' mean daughter in law? Maybe she wanted to cover her family member and leave you out there. Did you get your letter of reference?
    Yup. DIL is daughter-in-law. I was always taught not to mess with a patent airway, and the other nurse had 20 years of experience to my four months and they were mad at me for putting HER through having to suction. Huh?

    They didn't like me there. They were, frankly, unthinkingly cruel to some of the residents and I rocked the boat.

    It's okay. Time wounds all heels.
  11. by   SuesquatchRN
    Oh, and I got a reference - after I hired a lawyer.

    How do I find another lawyer? This guy really didn't want to do much, either. They're all related up here and I'm the flatlander from the big city.
  12. by   Lacie
    Anytime you need to secure an attorney insure that you inquire if they are "administrative" law vs criminal (you need administrative) and ask them if they have dealt with your state BON in the past. If so, in what situations, and what was thier success. If they dont have that experience directly with the BON, then seek another that does!! A complaint can be made against you at any time for any reason and done without the party disclosing who they are. Surprisingly it's not much different then the hotlines for criminals and given a number but with boards they dont even give you a number. If a complaint is made they must follow up. If you decide to fight it then you are the one responsible for ALL expenses including those ran up by the BON with attorneys and court reporters during the investigation. They dont pay for it YOU do. Keep that in mind for those that are fearful of getting liability insurance.
  13. by   SuesquatchRN
    Thanks, Lacie.

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