Nursing Shortage!! It's real and it bites (new grads, can't find a job? Read this post!) - page 3

I had no idea, when I took a job as a nurse manager of an inpatient unit at a rural hospital that's 4 hours away from the nearest large city, that a huge portion of my job stress would come from the... Read More

  1. by   DS22 MS
    I have seen job postings in local hospitals here in SoCal for RN positions (A BUNCH OF THEM) but wanting 3+ years & vast experience. I wonder why they don't fill. Seems like they want a seasoned nurse for pennies and will hold out until they get someone. It seems that way.

    I wish I lived someplace or knew EXACTLY where to go where I could get a position in healthcare as I attend school. I'm only in SoCal bc of school.

    Try being 47, medicinal chemist with both BS and MS in synthetic chemistry, patents, inventor of a Phase II clinical candidate, pre-nursing student, 4.0 GPA in prereqs and a 90.7% TEAS score, bilingual and get DENIED a position as a transporter by one of the largest hospitals in Orange County. Talk about a kick in the teeth.

    I heard that there is even a waitlist for volunteers.

    I just applied locally to the nursing school here and will send apps to a few others next month. I've contacted programs outside CA to see if there's a spot open in their fall cohorts. I'm truly looking at any school with a high NCLEX pass rate and a strong working relationship with their local hospitals in placement. CA isn't convincing me there is much opportunity post licensure.

    I hope once I've licensed, to leave CA forever and I'm a native. The place is beyond saturated. I wish I knew a rural town that would hire me and give me steady work.

    The economy as a whole is not well imo. It seems like the balance is SO tilted in favor of employers that prospective and current employees are essentially dealt a hand of "do you want a job with crummy pay or would you rather be unemployed and/or homeless?"
    Last edit by DS22 MS on Feb 9 : Reason: Better flow
  2. by   klone
    Quote from OldDude
    I apologize for getting out in the weeds in your post. As I mentioned, there are regional circumstances all over and I hear what you are saying and I believe you speak the truth. If I ever worked in a hospital again it would be in someplace you describe; for all the reasons associated with a small town. I just can't comprehend why more people would not be interested, especially the more experienced nurses who have been in the trenches for awhile.

    You could offer big sign on bonuses and relocation money but that would sully the current staff attitude.

    Your town isn't built over an old EPA radioactive waste site is it? Maybe that's the problem.
    Haha. No radioactive site, just a gorgeous coastal town that doesn't have a lot to offer beyond the natural beauty. The other issue in my particular community is the lack of housing. There a horrible lack of rental housing here that has prevented some nurses from relocating here. When we moved here, we purchased a house, which opens up more options. But not everyone is in a position to do that, or wants to.
  3. by   klone
    Sorry if I had a tantrum. It's just incredibly frustrating to have this issue that is literally keeping me awake at night, and then have people say that the problem doesn't really exist, and that I'm just holding out on hiring nurses because it's cheaper to make my current nurses work OT until they're exhausted and I'm trying to save some pennies.
  4. by   DS22 MS
    Quote from klone
    Sorry if I had a tantrum. It's just incredibly frustrating to have this issue that is literally keeping me awake at night, and then have people say that the problem doesn't really exist, and that I'm just holding out on hiring nurses because it's cheaper to make my current nurses work OT until they're exhausted and I'm trying to save some pennies.
    I hope when I license you're still looking. If you have a position offered, I'm there.
  5. by   FNP2B1
    Look at Bakersfield of Fresno or anywhere in the Central Valley. Lots of job openings. Its not OC but its a job.
  6. by   FNP2B1
    Start offering $100 per hour for RNs and see how quickly the nursing shortage at your hospital evaporates. I once interviewed for a NP position with Peace Health in Florence Oregon and was floored at what they offered. It just wasn't enough. They were $100,000 less than what I could get in California. Now if they start paying more sure I'd come back and work in coastal Oregon. It's all about the $$$$. I'm sure your hands are tied but if the hospital administrators want more nurses they are going to have to get off of their wallets and pay for it. There has to be an $$$$ incentive to get people to work in rural areas. The scenery just isn't enough. Where I am now, a very, very rural area with a population of 2000, I make what the MDs make. To make the offer sweeter the company offered $150,000 in a housing grant if I signed a 5 year contract. They understand what it take to have full staffing. Unfortunately many hospital groups do not.
  7. by   DS22 MS
    Quote from FNP2B1
    Start offering $100 per hour for RNs and see how quickly the nursing shortage at your hospital evaporates. I once interviewed for a NP position with Peace Health in Florence Oregon and was floored at what they offered. It just wasn't enough. They were $100,000 less than what I could get in California. Now if they start paying more sure I'd come back and work in coastal Oregon. It's all about the $$$$. I'm sure your hands are tied but if the hospital administrators want more nurses they are going to have to get off of their wallets and pay for it. There has to be an $$$$ incentive to get people to work in rural areas. The scenery just isn't enough. Where I am now, a very, very rural area with a population of 2000, I make what the MDs make. To make the offer sweeter the company offered $150,000 in a housing grant if I signed a 5 year contract. They understand what it take to have full staffing. Unfortunately many hospital groups do not.
    Wow! Man I wish I could just get work. That's beyond a great incentive. Congrats!
  8. by   FullGlass
    Quote from klone
    Yes, in many places there IS a nursing shortage. And frankly, it pisses me off that people say otherwise. Until you've been to these communities, you have no idea. You can believe whatever you want, but that doesn't make it so.

    Hospital that employs 400 nurses. Not to mention the SNFs, home health agencies, community health departments, clinics, hospices, and other various places that employ nurses. Local community college graduates 30 nurses a year. No other nursing schools in a 2-hour radius. You do the math.
    I'm sorry you are having such difficulties. Have you tried going to career fairs at other nursing schools farther away?

    I'm an NP and a Nurse Corps Scholar, so I had to take a job in a Health Professional Shortage Area (HPSA) with a HPSA score of 14 or higher. HRSA runs virtual job fairs for employers to recruit Nurse Corps Scholars. (I think these are NHSC Virtual Job Fairs). In addition, rural areas usually qualify for loan repayment and even forgiveness, so that might be an additional recruiting tool. Try targeting expensive nursing schools where the students will be more concerned about debt.

    Here is the link to the HRSA Health Workforce Connector - it is the site for Nurse Corps job search and for the virtual job fairs.
    Health Workforce Connector

    Best wishes.
  9. by   FullGlass
    Quote from klone
    Haha. No radioactive site, just a gorgeous coastal town that doesn't have a lot to offer beyond the natural beauty. The other issue in my particular community is the lack of housing. There a horrible lack of rental housing here that has prevented some nurses from relocating here. When we moved here, we purchased a house, which opens up more options. But not everyone is in a position to do that, or wants to.
    Being in a coastal community should be a big draw. However, if there is a lack of housing, that is a serious issue. Perhaps the hospital should make arrangements to build housing, like an apartment building, or purchase housing that can be rented. Another option would be to have good rates at local hotels and motels. Since this is a smaller community, maybe the hospital can work with local residents to rent out spare rooms to RNs. Best wishes.
  10. by   SpankedInPittsburgh
    FullGlass that is an excellent Idea. If some of these heavily indebted young nurses could get there student loans forgiven that would be a great draw
  11. by   DS22 MS
    Thanks. Because of back taxes liens from a personal business that went south I'm ineligible for assistance scholarship-wise with them. I don't have any drug or criminal records or other legal issues.

    So, It's a tough spot I'm in financially. Without a cert like an MA/CNA etc. I'm just not getting traction job wise in health care. I apply to anything that will get me in a hospital/clinic to get experience but it's uneventful. The Patient Transporter gig after two interviews seemed like I finally had a break. The two interviewers were glowing, repeating "impressive, impressive." Then the robo email sent out at midnight saying they went with someone else.

    Despite my past accomplishments and current potential it isn't enough (so far) to garner help with loans (at this point) to survive 1st year nursing school -even if I get accepted.

    I substitute teach 7th grade science but the calls are infrequent and rare. The instructors rate me highly and I do a great job but it's not a steady gig. I'm currently in pharmacology and pathophysiology so I'm busy on time but would scrape and claw to make time for a position somewhere that would be in a hospital or clinic to help.

    The federal student loan max currently is JUST enough to pay rent for a year which is sad. In CA my room for rent is $800/mo (which is a great deal in SoCal). I know that's a mortgage for some people but I have no choice.

    I recently did approach a couple expensive schools here and they have loans available but only for tuition. That's it. Having prior degrees eliminate you from Pell Grants.

    I would attend nursing school out of state if someone/a hospital was willing to invest in me. If I had to sign in for a multi year commitment in exchange for nursing school and financial support to attend, I would be on the next flight to be there. I want to work AND be an RN. I'm very driven but not knowledgeable/ignorant about who, what, where to go and talk to in nursing to make it all happen.

    I'm grateful to any ideas and support. I've been going solo for some time so it's all welcomed.

    Thanks all.
    Last edit by DS22 MS on Feb 9
  12. by   FullGlass
    Quote from DS22 MS
    Thanks. Because of back taxes liens from a personal business that went south I'm ineligible for assistance scholarship-wise with them. I don't have any drug or criminal records or other legal issues.

    So, It's a tough spot I'm in financially. Without a cert like an MA/CNA etc. I'm just not getting traction job wise in health care. I apply to anything that will get me in a hospital/clinic to get experience but it's uneventful. The Patient Transporter gig after two interviews seemed like I finally had a break. The two interviewers were glowing, repeating "impressive, impressive." Then the robo email sent out at midnight saying they went with someone else.

    Despite my past accomplishments and current potential it isn't enough (so far) to garner help with loans (at this point) to survive 1st year nursing school -even if I get accepted.

    I substitute teach 7th grade science but the calls are infrequent and rare. The instructors rate me highly and I do a great job but it's not a steady gig. I'm currently in pharmacology and pathophysiology so I'm busy on time but would scrape and claw to make time for a position somewhere that would be in a hospital or clinic to help.

    The federal student loan max currently is JUST enough to pay rent for a year which is sad. In CA my room for rent is $800/mo (which is a great deal in SoCal). I know that's a mortgage for some people but I have no choice.

    I recently did approach a couple expensive schools here and they have loans available but only for tuition. That's it. Having prior degrees eliminate you from Pell Grants.

    I would attend nursing school out of state if someone/a hospital was willing to invest in me. If I had to sign in for a multi year commitment in exchange for nursing school and financial support to attend, I would be on the next flight to be there. I want to work AND be an RN. I'm very driven but not knowledgeable/ignorant about who, what, where to go and talk to in nursing to make it all happen.

    I'm grateful to any ideas and support. I've been going solo for some time so it's all welcomed.

    Thanks all.
    I think you are posting on the wrong thread. Have you considered the military?
  13. by   DS22 MS
    Just showing how difficult it is to find positions in health care from transporter to RN and the few opportunities people to have to fill "apparent" deficits.

    Tried military- too old.

    I'll shut up now

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