Nursing Pay - page 3

Hi- I am new to the forum and have a question for everyone. I will be starting an accelerated nursing program soon and have a question about nursing pay. Where I live, nurses start at about... Read More

  1. by   EMAILRN
    Quote from haninks
    Hi- I am new to the forum and have a question for everyone. I will be starting an accelerated nursing program soon and have a question about nursing pay. Where I live, nurses start at about $28/hour. At 36 hours a week, this comes to $48,384. Do most nurses work a lot of overtime? I always hear how nurses make "such great money", but $48,384 is hardly great money. How much could I realistically make my first year as an RN? Thanks.
    Well, here in NY the start is at least $62,000 a year. It depends on where u live 2 don't forget...but remember nursing is not just about pushing a cart around and giving out drugs....thats where u get your experience.......but open you mind RN can bring you to a lot of places.....
  2. by   Halinja
    Quote from royr
    I would really like to know where in the USA nurses are in high demand as new grads, the public schools are good, and housing is inexpensive.
    Here's the problem as I see it (IMHO). If there are good public schools and housing is inexpensive, there isn't going to be a high demand for new nurses...the experienced nurses will already have moved there, and if it really is great, they won't leave. I would do that if I were them!

    The places having the most opportunities are going to be the places people don't really want to live, or can't afford to live, or the schools and neighborhoods aren't all that great.

    Again...just my opinion...
  3. by   NurseyPoo
    Hi there,

    I am new to this forum and wanted to make a comment on this thread...

    I returned to school in my 30's and graduated almost 2 years ago with a BSN, and have to say that Nurses do not make nearly enough for what we do. I started out at $20.50 an hour. After the first year the only raise that we received was a cost of living raise...$.82 an hour. I was so upset at that. I now work nights to compensate for the low rate. It totally depends on where you live. The problem that we face in Upstate NY are the taxes that we have to pay. The cost of living is tough here because of the taxes. The housing is very cheap but the taxes are usually more than the actual mortgage! I have been looking at potential areas to move. My husband and I discovered that in order to keep the lifestyle we are accustomed to I would have to do travel nursing. The money is fantastic but I do not want to be away from my family for 12 to 13 weeks at a time. If we relocate anywhere else we will not be able to afford a house that is even remotely comparible to the one we now own. So, what do you do but keep on truckin' along and deal with what you got. I know nurses all over the country and 2 have been trying to get us to move to their states (Florida and North Carolina). North Carolina offers alot more for me but nothing for my husband. Florida offers alot more for my husband but less for me).

    I think the bottom line is this...

    Nurses do not make enough for what they do! And, yes it is all relative to where you are located. Making $50K right out of school may seem great in one place but I know for fact that it is not enough in most of the Northeast or Southeastern States.

    Sorry to be so wordy with my first post
  4. by   Plagueis
    Quote from catlady
    Today the minimum wage is $5.15 an hour, and the average new nurse starts out at around $20 an hour with lots of perks. But we still have students complaining that $28/hr isn't enough.

    It's entry level, people. A new nurse hasn't proven herself to anyone, other than she can pass a school program. It will take months to years for that nurse to become even marginally proficient. Some things have to be earned, including pay and respect.
    As someone who earns less than $25,000 per year, let me tell you that $28 per hour would be a big improvement to me, especially for a starting salary for a new nurse. I know that some complain that it's too little, so I was wondering: what do any of you think should be the starting salary for a new, graduate nurse?
  5. by   piper_for_hire
    It all depends on cost of living, of course, but I think $40 would be a good starting place. Oh - did I just solve the nursing shortage?

    -S

    Quote from Tommybabe
    As someone who earns less than $25,000 per year, let me tell you that $28 per hour would be a big improvement to me, especially for a starting salary for a new nurse. I know that some complain that it's too little, so I was wondering: what do any of you think should be the starting salary for a new, graduate nurse?
  6. by   2bNurseguru
    I currently make 40K in another field with 5 years experience. I don't think this is great pay and I am considering accelerated BSN since I already have a masters in another field. My current degree is in nutrition and I am hoping I can somehow combine the two and expand my opportunities. Anyone heard of someone combining RN with Nutrition? If I can make at least 50K here in the mid west, I would be a happy camper

    Do you think the extra pay would be worth the tuition cost and loss of pay for 2 years?
  7. by   CityKat
    Quote from catlady
    It's entry level, people. A new nurse hasn't proven herself to anyone, other than she can pass a school program. It will take months to years for that nurse to become even marginally proficient. Some things have to be earned, including pay and respect.
    I have to say catlady, while I certainly believe that us new grads are entry level and we all have to start out on the low end of the totum pole. But offering a new grad $28 an hour when we are dealing with chemotherapy, radiation, HIV+ patients, blood born pathogens, etc., I think paying a new grad anything LESS than $35 an hour is a crime in itself. REGARDLESS of whether we just started or not. My life and my health is very important and accidents happen, even with the experienced nurse.

    This all boils down to unfair pay all around, regardless if you are experienced or not. IMO and in many other RN's opinions who I have talked too, a starting pay should be closer to $35-$40 and then rises as experience is gained. But, this is in a perfect world and we all know that nursing is far underpaid for the amount of work and the dangers they encounter everyday.
    Last edit by CityKat on Sep 11, '06
  8. by   catlady
    Quote from StudentNurseBean
    I have to say catlady, while I certainly believe that us new grads are entry level and we all have to start out on the low end of the totum pole. But offering a new grad $28 an hour when we are dealing with chemotherapy, radiation, HIV+ patients, blood born pathogens, etc., I think paying a new grad anything LESS than $35 an hour is a crime in itself. REGARDLESS of whether we just started or not. My life and my health is very important and accidents happen, even with the experienced nurse.

    This all boils down to unfair pay all around, regardless if you are experienced or not. IMO and in many other RN's opinions who I have talked too, a starting pay should be closer to $35-$40 and then rises as experience is gained. But, this is in a perfect world and we all know that nursing is far underpaid for the amount of work and the dangers they encounter everyday.
    So new grads should make more than experienced nurses? Because I don't make $35/hr. And I came from a very high cost area, too--close to what you're spending in NYC--and never made more than the high 20s while I was living there (moved away last year).

    I'd like to see everyone's pay rise, including mine. But right now there are too many cases where experience and expertise are not rewarded, and too many cases of "I'm entitled." Nobody's entitled to anything, much as we'd like to hope we're so valuable. We are only entitled to what our employers are willing to pay us. And when new grads make more than nurses with years of experience and certifications in their specialties, something's totally messed up.
  9. by   catlady
    Quote from piper_for_hire
    It all depends on cost of living, of course, but I think $40 would be a good starting place. Oh - did I just solve the nursing shortage?
    No, not really, because if you inflate the wage beyond what the employer is willing to pay, they're going to look for alternatives. Otherwise they'd just pay everyone $100K per annum and everyone would be happy, right? You can't try to outprice the marketplace or you'll be left on the outside looking in. Laws of economics do exist, whether we like them or not.
  10. by   Otessa
    "But offering a new grad $28 an hour when we are dealing with chemotherapy, radiation, HIV+ patients, blood born pathogens, etc., I think paying a new grad anything LESS than $35 an hour is a crime in itself. "

    You did know that these were the risks involved in being a Nurse and you did know what the pay rate would be when you graduated, right?
  11. by   barbyann
    All I know is I made the same money as a waitress, without all the stress. I went into nursing to get the benefits (health, pension) and now they are all disappearing. I might go back to waitressing (got a job offer this week).
  12. by   NurseyPoo
    In regards to the amount of experience...I had a friend who was incredibly frustrated by the rates that new grads were coming in at and she quit her position for a position at another facility willing to pay her more. She wound up going back to the hospital that she had started with and is making even more money now. So, the way that I see it is that if a person is not willing to fight for better wages they will not recieve them.

    It is common knowledge at the facility that I work in that many of the more experienced nurses are frustrated and they are all rallying for better wages. I am just keeping my mouth shut because I am still relatively new to the field. I work with one nurse in particular who has been with this hospital since she graduated 18 years ago. She only makes $5 more an hour than I do. I personally feel that there is definitely something wrong with that. She is a fantastic nurse, an incredible patient and family advocate, is on more boards and clubs for nurses than anyone I know and she moon-lights as an educator for the hospital...I personally feel she has been taken advantage of. She told me that she feels like she sold her soul to the devil. Where does she go from here? She knows that in order to get the salary she needs and deserves she will have to leave all of the people she has grown to love. We are somewhat remote here...that means she would need to commute quite a distance for a better salary...NOT FAIR!!!

    I just think that the entire field needs to increase base wages and offer more bonus incentives to senior nurses. I worked in corporate for many years and we had a pay scale...The pay scale for nurses is ridiculous. I have friends in this field all over the country and they all have this exact same complaint. We just do not get paid enough across the board! It does not matter what level you are at...
  13. by   TinyNurse
    So why are our wages so low considering our job hazards?

    I took a staff job because I really liked the place. Now, six months down the line i'm realizing that the only way I can "move ahead" financially is by going back to traveling, or going agency.

    I love my hospital, I love everyone I work with and I feel a sense of "ownership" being a staff nurse. I will shout it from the roof tops that my hospital is phenominal! However my staff nurse wage doesn't even pay my current bills, let alone allow me to move ahead.

    I applied to take my CEN. I called HR last week to ask if there were any wage incentives when I pass, and they told me, "No".

    Overtime? sure, tons of overtime available, but i'm a single mother and I'd rather be with my son helping him with homework, and raising him, etc rather than paying a babysitter to do that.

    So, how and when do you decide to leave a job you love--------just to chance it at a place you don't know you'll love for more money?

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