Nurses wearing white - page 6

The hospital has decreed that all nurses will wear white in the near future. Despite a petition to administration voicing the opinions of the nurses that overwhelmingly the majority of nurses working... Read More

  1. by   Sylv
  2. by   Sylv
    I've had to wear all white for about the past 15 years and have no problem with it. I always go to work (hospital med-surg) clean and pressed. I have no problem keeping the uniform clean at work and have no problem keeping the uniforms white. My underwear does not show through either.
  3. by   allamericangirl
    Quote from hoppermom3
    For me, my appearance definitely has an effect on my attitude. Even when I was taking pre-reqs, I rarely wore jeans to school. On days when I must give a presentation of some sort or address the class (I am class treasurer), I always wear my hair up and a dress or suit. I just find that it gives me confidence. When I go to clinicals, I am picky about having my clothes pressed and my nametag on straight. These little things make a difference in my attitude and presentation of myself.
    The students in my clinical group who don't care about how they look are the same ones whining at the end of the day if nothing "exciting" happened. They are not interested in patients and patient care, only in procedures.
    Last night, I tried on the uniform dress I got yesterday with my cap I have for pinning/pictures. My daughter told my that I looked like a real nurse. I can't wait to be a real nurse!
    Don't you really wish that it was an acceptable practice for you to be able to dress like that every day?
    Last edit by allamericangirl on Jan 14, '05
  4. by   hoppermom3
    Actually, I really do. I think I was born in the wrong era. I would love to work somewhere where I white dress and cap was acceptable attire.
    Althought I love to ride motorcycles and dress in jeans and leathers when I do so, I truly enjoy wearing dresses and skirts.
  5. by   LPN1974
    Well, I work in a facility where I actually can wear blue jeans to work. And I'm an LPN.
    I work in DDS. So most of us wear jeans, and a scrub top, In cold weather, I wear a sweatshirt because we have to go from building to building.
    We are always clean, and neat, and I love being able to dress this way. But of course this is not the normal attire for nurses. Medical personnel is also required to wear name badges.
    I would hate going back to total white.
    If I worked in a hospital I would prefer scrubs. They are more practical.

    Oh, yes, at one time, our DON thought about going back to white uniforms, but we all raised such a fuss about it, she backed off. I think she would like for us to have something in common, but hasn't been able to come up with a uniform for us in our particular setting. During cold weather scrubs are not practical for us. I have had to wade thru ankle deep snow before to get where I needed to go.
    Last edit by LPN1974 on Jan 14, '05
  6. by   allamericangirl
    Quote from hoppermom3
    Actually, I really do. I think I was born in the wrong era. I would love to work somewhere where I white dress and cap was acceptable attire.
    Althought I love to ride motorcycles and dress in jeans and leathers when I do so, I truly enjoy wearing dresses and skirts.
    Well, I am actually making a search to find hospitals where they want to project a very professional image. If they are persnickety about public perception, they are also going to offer great patient care. One goes with the other.

    I have found that to be true as a patient. I can't imagine it not being true as an employee in the same place.

    I notice that the only place that I have been able to find good looking uniforms on the web is at the sites from the UK. The American manufacturers are making the most disgusting stuff I have ever seen... looks cheap and all the same styles, over and over. Looks like some one wanting to design and manufacture some good looking uniforms in the US would have a heyday.

    If anyone knows of a good place to buy good looking professional looking nursing attire, please share.
  7. by   allamericangirl
    Quote from LPN1974
    Well, I work in a facility where I actually can wear blue jeans to work. And I'm an LPN.
    I work in DDS. So most of us wear jeans, and a scrub top, In cold weather, I wear a sweatshirt because we have to go from building to building.
    We are always clean, and neat, and I love being able to dress this way. But of course this is not the normal attire for nurses. Medical personnel is also required to wear name badges.
    I would hate going back to total white.
    If I worked in a hospital I would prefer scrubs. They are more practical.
    Sounds like you are in a western area of the US. Very casual.
  8. by   LPN1974
    Quote from allamericangirl
    Sounds like you are in a western area of the US. Very casual.
    No I'm in the south, Arkansas.
  9. by   UM Review RN
    In every profession the "dress for success" moto is very realistic. Why do you think that Nursing is immune from a factor that effects every other profession/industry?
    Oh, I dunno. Maybe it's because I'm not really thinking about how I look when I'm bent double over an arresting patient found on the floor in a puddle of bodily secretions.

    The patient probably doesn't care either.

    If I wear white, I'm quite aware that my undies are visible through my slacks, wet or dry, but worse when wet--right up until the moment that I see a person dead on the floor.

    IMHO, I never look more professional than when I'm saving someone's life. That is what a nurse is to me. "Dressing for success" means I wear clothing that is suited to allow me to perform the actions that are necessary to save someone's life.

    I'm sure not one person in the room of that Coding patient gives a flying fig that they can see what kind of underwear I'm wearing as I give chest compressions, help to lift the (still secreting bodily fluids) patient onto the bed, and continue to try to save a life.

    But MY job gets pretty messy. After we rescue that person, I'll still have to attend to other patients and I really don't need to LOOK like I've been battling Death for the past two hours; it upsets them. I don't have time to take a break and freshen up, I'm already behind and have an extra hour's charting to do.

    So please, by all means, wear what you like to your job. But don't try to impose your idealistic notions of what constitutes professional dress for nurses on me. Please. Thank you.
  10. by   alexillytom
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    Oh, I dunno. Maybe it's because I'm not really thinking about how I look when I'm bent double over an arresting patient found on the floor in a puddle of bodily secretions.

    The patient probably doesn't care either.

    If I wear white, I'm quite aware that my undies are visible through my slacks, wet or dry, but worse when wet--right up until the moment that I see a person dead on the floor.

    IMHO, I never look more professional than when I'm saving someone's life. That is what a nurse is to me. "Dressing for success" means I wear clothing that is suited to allow me to perform the actions that are necessary to save someone's life.

    I'm sure not one person in the room of that Coding patient gives a flying fig that they can see what kind of underwear I'm wearing as I give chest compressions, help to lift the (still secreting bodily fluids) patient onto the bed, and continue to try to save a life.

    But MY job gets pretty messy. After we rescue that person, I'll still have to attend to other patients and I really don't need to LOOK like I've been battling Death for the past two hours; it upsets them. I don't have time to take a break and freshen up, I'm already behind and have an extra hour's charting to do.

    So please, by all means, wear what you like to your job. But don't try to impose your idealistic notions of what constitutes professional dress for nurses on me. Please. Thank you.
    As someone who is not a nurse yet but have been assisted by the most wonderful nurse I have ever met, the lack of uniform didn't make me or my family feel uneasy.
    Nor did we find our nurse to be unprofessional because she wore brightly colored scrubs. That was all so inconsequential. What I noticed was how much she cared for my nephew even though she knew he was not going to live. I also noticed how compassionately and honestly she dealt with my sister when it came time for her to make the hard decisions. I also noticed how she discreetly left the room so we, as a family, could say goodbye to our baby. The thing that really left the biggest impact on me and my family was the poem that she wrote for my sister, that offered her some kind of peace after her son was pronounced dead. That poem was included on the program for his funeral and read at the ceremony. We speak fondly of her whenever we recall that baby's last days after the horrific accident that took his life. We never, ever discuss what she was wearing.
  11. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    So please, by all means, wear what you like to your job. But don't try to impose your idealistic notions of what constitutes professional dress for nurses on me. Please

    BRAVO!!!!
  12. by   acgemt
    I have been collecting information from numerous nursing sites for my presentation entitled "nursing uniforms and the image of nursing." It is interesting to read everyones' points of view. I for one believe there would be a lot of menstruating females out there that would not enjoy the idea of all white uniforms. After doing some looking around, I have found my opinion lies more in the styles of nursing uniforms today. I found several stores that sell capris as scrub pants...capris??? and also flare leg scrub pants. I think we all have to realize that our uniforms are changing with todays society and fashion trends. However, I also think that we have to realize how much freedom we have right now to choose what we wear. Imagine if we were in the 18 and 1900s where there were no options...what we were required to wear is what was worn...no questions asked. I think we have to have an appreciation of where nursing uniforms began, and be grateful for what we have today.
  13. by   rnmi2004
    Quote from allamericangirl
    Well, I am actually making a search to find hospitals where they want to project a very professional image. If they are persnickety about public perception, they are also going to offer great patient care. One goes with the other.

    I have found that to be true as a patient. I can't imagine it not being true as an employee in the same place.
    I find this to be an amusing theory. Please let us know if it actually works that way.

    I like scrubs. They may not look "professional" enough for some people, but if I was that concerned about appearance, I'd go into a different field. They are comfortable & allow freedom of movement for the physical aspects of the job.

    Let's face it--nursing isn't glamorous, so I don't see why some feel the need to put so much effort into the attire.

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