Nitrous Oxide in the ED...

  1. 0
    Hi All,

    We are currently in the (very) preliminary stages of possibly creating a protocol for N.O. use by RN's in our ED for sedation during minor procedures. RN's use it daily in the L&D department. I know that this is not exactly the same use and the N.O. to O2 percentages are not the same in the blender. And from what I've seen with it's use in L&D it doesn't offer much "sedation" as such (which is a good thing in that setting), so I am looking specifically for ED use. Anyone use N.O. in their ED? Anyone know where I can read current policies specifically for this use? I'm just looking to read them to get some ideas on how other ED's use the gas, like I said we are still VERY early in this process.

    P.S. This post could be appropriate for nurses who use N.O. in an ambulatory clinic, urgent care, or minor OR too...

    Thanks!
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  3. 13 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Oh, and I did look through the previous posts and found that most of the links in the posts no longer work and many of the posts are 5-10 yrs old! Thanks...
  5. 0
    Used it for awhile with good results, but the docs decided it was too great a risk becuase we're 4000 ft above sea level. Never did get a good explantaionof that, but no hospitals or EMS here use it.
  6. 0
    I guess I'll have to check out how altitude affects nitrous oxide! Thanks! We are at sea level here!

    BTW... I should not have used N.O. for short... that my make ppl think I was referring to Nitric oxide... not nitrous oxide AKA N2O

    Thanks
  7. 0
    Quote from dthfytr
    Used it for awhile with good results, but the docs decided it was too great a risk becuase we're 4000 ft above sea level. Never did get a good explantaionof that, but no hospitals or EMS here use it.
    dthfytr, did you complete a course or module re: administration of N2O? Can't seem to find any online...
  8. 2
    Quote from dthfytr
    Used it for awhile with good results, but the docs decided it was too great a risk becuase we're 4000 ft above sea level. Never did get a good explantaionof that, but no hospitals or EMS here use it.
    Nitrous readily penetrates lipid membranes and can easy offgas in air filled cavities. Ears, stomach, intestines and even eyes can be effected. Clearly, changes in barometric pressure can be met with consequences in patients with bowel obstruction, retinal detachment and so on. Another potential concern is B12 deficiency with prolonged use and potential concern about teratogenic effects and pregnancy.
    ~*Stargazer*~ and dthfytr like this.
  9. 0
    Quote from gilarrt
    nitrous readily penetrates lipid membranes and can easy offgas in air filled cavities. ears, stomach, intestines and even eyes can be effected. clearly, changes in barometric pressure can be met with consequences in patients with bowel obstruction, retinal detachment and so on. another potential concern is b12 deficiency with prolonged use and potential concern about teratogenic effects and pregnancy.
    yes, i know about the side effects and contraindications for the gas (we use it daily for our l&d pt's) but i guess i have never really paid attention to the altitude aspect of possible consequences as it hasn't really been an issue here.
  10. 1
    I can see problems primarily with the gas laws and ascent/descent. Is it a real, well founded risk at 3,000 feet msl? I'm not so sure, but the United States is a bit fickle in some areas regarding treatments and interventions.
    dthfytr likes this.
  11. 0
    Honestly, I think it's a combination of altitude and lawyers scaring the docs of.
  12. 0
    Our EMS agency uses it. It is patient controlled with a hand held mouth piece. They figure if the patient gets too much, they won't be able to get it in their mouth to inhale more.


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