Never placed an IV!!!!! - page 12

I'm not sure what to do and this sounds ridiculous! I just started a new position and realized I have never placed an IV and I have never stuck anyone for blood - my last job had IV team and... Read More

  1. Visit  MochaRN424 profile page
    0
    Here I thought I was the only one who didn't have this experience. I have almost two years of nursing (23 months) expereince and I just had my 3rd child (not planned at all). So I have been off the floor for 2 years now. My last position MIU promised that I could learn IV starts and blood draws without any problems but can I tell you that it never happened....and this was a teaching university in VA.

    Sure anyone can draw off an arm they have with the IV bag filled with kool-aid with previous needle marks and excellent veins. I wanted to be the best for my patients and it was uncomfortable for me trying to draw blood when I had only gotten to draw literally a couple of times. I asked if I could come in on "my time" which means they would NOT have to pay me...still no success. I too came from a hospital where there was an IV team who did everything. I hope that you will get the experience you are looking for because I did not.

    I guess hospitals don't appreciate someone who has the desire to learn so they can be the best they can be. But had I made a serious mistake or caused harm then they would have been glad to have my license taken away. I don't understand the nursing profession and why since the age of 5 I wanted to be a nurse in the first place....
  2. Visit  wannabecnl profile page
    3
    My nursing program did not teach us to start IVs. We did many other skills in the sim lab, including suctioning, placing and removing Foleys, placing and using NG tubes, FSBS, etc. I used some of these in clinicals and have done some (not all) on the job. I work in the PACU now, and it is extremely rare that we start IVs. I asked about going to pre-op to learn, and my preceptor pointed out that anesthesia staff start most of the IVs in pre-op. Her advice was to hang with the IV team for a day, but also said that I would not have to start many (and as many have mentioned here, if you don't use a skill, you tend to lose it).

    Also, I tried to avoid weighing in on the side discussion of the poor training of us new grads, but I just have to say one thing. Learning to put in an IV is nothing like learning pharmacology. Implying that not teaching IV starts is tantamount to not teaching pharmacology is ludicrous. I never learned to administer drugs through a PICC line until my first job, and after I had 2 patients with PICCs one day, each on multiple IV meds, I had it down. The semesters of learning pathophysiology and pharmacology are how I knew that the meds were safe and appropriate, the doses made sense, and I could explain the medications to the patients when they inevitably asked me questions. If a junkie can learn to hit a vein, I can probably pick it up when I need to.
    dudette10, MochaRN424, and VANurse2010 like this.
  3. Visit  wannabecnl profile page
    0
    Sorry, can't edit my post but realized something wasn't clear in the last paragraph. Starting an IV is not the same as giving drugs through a PICC (despite my over-bookish but allegedly impractical new grad education, I do know that much! ). I was just using the PICC scenario as an example of something I never saw once in nursing school (others had patients with PICCs and learned to do them in clinicals) but was able to pick up once I was working. There would not be time to learn pharmacology and pathophysiology at the bedside, so given a choice with limited time and resources, I think my school and many others have chosen wisely.
  4. Visit  T-Bird78 profile page
    0
    I'm happy to say that my technical college did teach IVs and blood draws and we're LPNs. We practiced on fake arms (the school's insurance wouldn't let us practice on each other) but my preceptor at a clinical rotation and teacher let me practice on them--just placing the cath and stopping when I got good flash. I never did it in the real world and that's hurting my job search, even though I tell them I did it in nursing school and know I can pick it up again when I actually get to do it.
  5. Visit  vintagePN profile page
    0
    I'm in first semester of nursing school and we we're told that we will learn how to maintain an iv line, how to discontinue one...but not how to start one. Why? They said our future workplaces should teach us or we can take a separate course through the college...im not sure why they don't include it.
  6. Visit  GrnTea profile page
    1
    Fact is you probably won't need to know how to start IVs nearly as much as how to use them, trouble-shoot them, and maintain them safely-- especially in your student clinical time.

    I know students get really excited about the tasks they think are so important, like "giving shots," starting IVs, and placing catheters and NG tubes, but trust me: We teach these, and more complex tasks, to lay people all the time. You will have far, far more experience at all of those in your first three months on the job and it won't matter a tinker's dam* whether you ever had a chance to practice one while a student.


    *TOS worriers: before you blank it out, look it up. It's not profanity.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tinker
    ^"A Tinker's dam". usingenglish.com
    ^John Bonner, George William Curtis (1905).
    dudette10 likes this.
  7. Visit  dudette10 profile page
    0
    Quote from GrnTea
    Fact is you probably won't need to know how to start IVs nearly as much as how to use them, trouble-shoot them, and maintain them safely-- especially in your student clinical time.

    I know students get really excited about the tasks they think are so important, like "giving shots," starting IVs, and placing catheters and NG tubes, but trust me: We teach these, and more complex tasks, to lay people all the time. You will have far, far more experience at all of those in your first three months on the job and it won't matter a tinker's dam* whether you ever had a chance to practice one while a student.


    Agreed. I was one of those worriers about tasks when I first started. Trouble-shooting has become a much more important "task" than textbook placement. In short order, the tasks themselves become easy and take a rightful backseat to assessment, recognition of a patient in trouble (or who will be in trouble if we don't act), nursing interventions for patient "irritants" that don't need medical intervention as a first line, understanding labs and what needs to be reported ASAP, etc.

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