Medical Workers wearing scrubs to and from work, outside the Hospital, etc.. - page 2

New York Daily News Tuesday Oct. 17th 2006 -Barbara M. Simpson writes: "MEDICAL WORKERS NEED TO CHANGE I have bben wondering if there is now a rule that persons who work in the medical field,... Read More

  1. by   CarVsTree
    When my institution provides my scrubs and a place for me to change into/out of them, I'll be happy to comply. Until then, I'll wear them to work and to the grocery store, etc. And I'll try my best not to rub my germy self all over the strangers I meet there. :trout:
    Last edit by CarVsTree on Oct 26, '06
  2. by   Blee O'Myacin
    the produce shelves at the supermarket! Going to the bank after work in blood splattered, vomit coated scrubs is unnessary, but I'd be willing to hypothesize that our scrubs are no more or less germ-ridden that regular street clothes worn all day. And if we were to compare, swab per swab, Officer O'Myacin's uniform is by and far filthier than mine at the end of any given shift!

    Blee
  3. by   Princess74
    Most people that I see wearing scrubs turn out to be housekeepers for hotels, cooks, and people who just want to wear them because they like them. They are not even in the medical profession. Now a days it seems everyone wears scrubs the way that they wear jeans. Doesn't matter if they are in the medical profession or not. They seem to be the uniform of choice for many professions.
    If I were to need to stop by the store on my way home I would do it in my scrubs, I don't have enough time in my day to go home first, shower and change and then go back out to run an errand.
  4. by   Spatialized
    It is a peeve of mine to see people in scrubs in public, but I've learned to live with it. Granted, normal everyday street clothes are probably just as nasty as scrubs worn on the floors, but some may not think about that when you see scrubs on the person standing over your fresh produce at the market.

    Myself, I prefer to either change, or go straight home. Being a cycle communter before, I've had to change in some unpleasant places and am pretty used to it. Sometimes you just have to gut it out, if that is what you want to do. I like to change before leaving, but that's me, I'm not going to force that on anyone.

    Cheers,
    Tom
  5. by   daisey_may
    Quote from Spatialized

    Myself, I prefer to either change, or go straight home. Being a cycle communter before, I've had to change in some unpleasant places and am pretty used to it. Sometimes you just have to gut it out, if that is what you want to do. I like to change before leaving, but that's me, I'm not going to force that on anyone.
    Exactly. I think it is a personal preference and if it is YOUR preference to be in street clothes on the streets and scrubs during the day. Idon't think less of anyone who is in scrubs. I figure they have a hectic schedule like me or some other excuse. And I've seen so many patients who bring their OWN scrubs that who knows how many people have scrubs that are not in the medical profession.

    It's impractical to be anything more than clean when you're working on the floor. Do you change you're shoes and take a shower just before and after you are at the hospital? And how about the number of people who leave their stethoscopes on the floor or over thier rear-view mirror? ...and i don't even want to think about what's growing all over my badge.

    I often wonder how I've kept myself from becoming a germaphobe and not wearing gloves for EVERYTHING I touch (like door handles, shopping carts...)
  6. by   BSNtobe2009
    Well, when you think about it, alot of doctors when they make their rounds come to the hospital in street clothes with a lab coat.
  7. by   babynurselsa
    Yeah my scrubs are soooo much nastier than that lady in the mucky looking slippers and the stained, dirty t-shirt, and the pajama pants that obviously she did not put on just today who just sneezed on her hand before she touched the lettuce..............
    I think this person has an outsider view of things. If my scrubs are visibly soiled I WANT to get straight home and shower and change. But, if I need to stop and get gas, or milk on the way home, I will.
    I would much rather have my street clothes on, but depending what shift you work it may not be feasible to go home, shower,change and THEN go to the post office.
  8. by   MS._Jen_RN
    Quote from BSNtobe2009
    Well, when you think about it, alot of doctors when they make their rounds come to the hospital in street clothes with a lab coat.
    Not to mention that there is question as to the last time that the lab coat was washed and not just hung on the back of the office door at the end of the day.

    I think that the public is often just unaware of many factors this discussion involves. I could just see all 15 floor staff for my evening shift trying to change in the bathrooms before the shift starts.
    ~Jen
  9. by   Halinja
    Quote from BSNtobe2009
    Well, when you think about it, alot of doctors when they make their rounds come to the hospital in street clothes with a lab coat.
    I watched as a doctor removed a bandage on an abdominal incision, then leaned forward to inspect something. His tie swept across the length of the incision. The next time I showed up on the floor, that patient's incision was infected with MRSA.

    Now, I'm not saying the tie did it, who knows? But after it trouched that incision, did he take it off? Or did he wear it home, hug his wife and kids, go out to dinner or....? Doesn't make him any cleaner than someone wearing their scrubs home.
  10. by   GeminiTwinRN
    Quote from Halinja
    I watched as a doctor removed a bandage on an abdominal incision, then leaned forward to inspect something. His tie swept across the length of the incision. The next time I showed up on the floor, that patient's incision was infected with MRSA.

    Now, I'm not saying the tie did it, who knows? But after it trouched that incision, did he take it off? Or did he wear it home, hug his wife and kids, go out to dinner or....? Doesn't make him any cleaner than someone wearing their scrubs home.
  11. by   onlyhope
    I wonder kind of world Barbara Simpson lives in, "if there is now a RULE that persons who work in the medical field, hospitals, nursing homes, etc. can wear their uniforms in the streets, on the buses and on the trains. " Oh please give me a break! We are not 'old-time lepers.' Doesn't she realize the germs she is exposed to in public? Perhaps she should wear gloves when she goes out of her house. Her life must be pretty good if this is her big concern. By the way, most nurses want to get them off as soon as possible. Scrubs really aren't high fashion. Perhaps she needs to get a life and quit worrying so much about other people.
    I agree! this woman needs to get a life and quit sweating the small stuff. sometimes i think that people just make stuff up to complain about so that they can be miserable and their lives full of drama.
  12. by   Galvatron1
    I'm glad this topic has gotten a lot of you stirred up, that's awesome that we got such a wide spectrum of viewpoints on this topic! I never new that some of you guys and gals don't have locker rooms to change, like we do here in NYC, that poses an interesting problem.

    However, I am a little concerned that some of you would only change if the issue was whether the hospital brought your scrubs or whether you had to buy them. This is not an issue about the money, it's about doing the right thing and thinking about exposing innocent children, elderly, immunosuppressed, etc. ppl of the public, to the germs we face daily in our respective hospitals or doctor's office.

    Let's face it, there are a lot more diseases we are exposed to in our profession, than that are out there in the general public areas...if ppl weren't ill or afflicted, they wouldn't need our care or be in a hospital to get our scrubs dirty!! LoLz!!
  13. by   hogan4736
    Quote from Galvatron1
    ...However, I am a little concerned that some of you would only change if the issue was whether the hospital brought your scrubs or whether you had to buy them. This is not an issue about the money, it's about doing the right thing and thinking about exposing innocent children, elderly, immunosuppressed, etc. ppl of the public, to the germs we face daily in our respective hospitals or doctor's office.

    Let's face it, there are a lot more diseases we are exposed to in our profession, than that are out there in the general public areas...if ppl weren't ill or afflicted, they wouldn't need our care or be in a hospital to get our scrubs dirty!! LoLz!!
    A few germs clinging on to my scrubs after work, at the grocery store, is the least of our problems...

    The overprescribed (and over-asked for) antibiotics that we (USA) give at the drop of a hat, are the REAL problem...

close