Male interested in nursing - need help

  1. Hello,

    I am about to graduate from college with an undergrad in psychology. I am a male that has been in the IT field for 10 years, and I am very burnt out by the superficiality of the field. I am very interested in nursing, but I know that getting into a nursing program is very difficult.

    I am a male with a 3.69 GPA and I am in several honor societies. However, I do not have any medical experience besides observation (shadowing) and a little red cross volunteer work. I want to enter into the Georgia State University accelerated BSN program after I graduate. On average, they have 600+ applicants for 56 slots each year 2x a year.

    Are there any books that help with the application process, such as how to write a great essay and how to get the best letters of recommendations? I looked on amazon and the closet book I found was "how to get into any PA school."

    Thank you for all of your help and I hope to be a nurse one day!
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   Daytonite
    I cannot speak to the subject of any books on the market to advise you with the application process. However, I can write to the interview process since I was a nurse manager who hired nurses for my unit. If you get called for an interview just be yourself. Be honest and forthright. I left bookkeeping to go into nursing for the similar reason of interactions among co-workers being very superficial. I needed something with more meat to it and to be doing something that was making a difference in another person's life. Viola--nursing! I've never regretted that decision. Read up on the interview process and advice from career sites or books on careers. Prospective students are often asked the same kinds of questions at a nursing school interview that are asked during a job interview. What are your strong points, weak points, how do you handle conflict with others. Then, there's that clincher--why do you want to be a nurse. I've heard many say that schools actually look for unique or heart-wrenching responses to this question that make you stand out from the rest of the crowd. The qualities looked for in a nurse are things like sensitivity, non-judgmentalism and acceptance of others, autonomy, eagerness to problem solve and an independent spirit come to mind. Interviewers look for these qualities in prospective nursing students. A good reference to have would be from a former professor or instructor who can attest to your study skills.
  4. by   voiddweller
    Thanks for the advice!

    I have been a business owner for 2 years (I owned 2 at one time, but it got too overwhelming) while I attended school full-time. I have always leaned on my innate empathy for individuals in my business, and have always ended up working with friendship type relationships with my clients rather than professional business relationships (which I know from experience is not always the right thing to do - especially in the dog eat dog world of IT and marketing). Also, when I was a child I helped my mother out with her cocaine problem for about 3 years despite the abuse that was going on, and pulled myself out of that downward spiral by being strong and overcoming obstacles.

    Do you think I should mention the above in my personal statement and interview, or is that a bit too personal? Thanks again for your advice!
  5. by   Daytonite
    Yes, I think the empathy is good to mention. I would mention that you helped your mother out through an illness and wouldn't go into details of drug abuse unless they ask what was wrong with her. Even then, I'd say she had emotional problems and resist mentioning the drug abuse. Don't say too much that is going to make you look like a weak person. Nurses stand strong.
  6. by   mollysn
    Hi, I also have my BA in Psychology and decide to go into nursing. I am in an accelerated program and the only advice I would give you is apply early. I had to wait on a waiting list for a year. The hard thing about nursing school sometimes is just getting in. Good Luck to you!

    Molly
  7. by   PatrickJ
    Do not hesitate, run, speed, fly to register for your program.
    Seriously, Nursing is a fun career. Some excitement, loads of treats at the desk to munch on daily too.
    Nice thing is, we do not have to wear skirts or those little nancy nurse hats anymore.
    Granted, I miss booking drunks at 3 am, and the occassional high speed chase, but it is all replaced with "ah, here is my favorite nurse" .
    Do it, thou shall no longer go cold, wet or hungry.
  8. by   Cute_CNA
    Well, the fact that you will soon already have another degree will make you look better, especially being in honor societies and having a very good GPA. If you want to make yourself even more appealing, become a CNA before applying. Some hospitals have training programs, or you could go to school. Check the want ads to see if there are any places that offer training on-site.

    Also, they have volunteer programs at hospitals. Check the websites of hospitals near you, and participate!

    If you look online for "getting letters of recommendation" and "writing personal statements," you'll find plenty of stuff. Google it.

    Another thing: if you go to the library and look up grants for financial aid, you'll find a lot of scholarships for males going into nursing. Since you are considered a minority as a male, you have an advantage. You are already very well qualified, in my opinion, but I think it helps to be male. Get someone else to pay for your education!
    Last edit by Cute_CNA on Nov 30, '05
  9. by   Dayray
    If I were in your situation I wouldn't bother applying to a BSN program. Look for a bachelor to MSN bridge program. They allow you to get a masters in nursing in 18 - 24 months. You wouldn't be a nurse practitioner just an RN with a masters.

    The upside to this is not only that you finish faster but that you have a masters. Also these programs are not nearly as competitive as BSN programs because there are less applicants. You just have to pass the GRE and you're in.
  10. by   TypicalFish
    Quote from voiddweller
    Hello,

    I am about to graduate from college with an undergrad in psychology. I am a male that has been in the IT field for 10 years, and I am very burnt out by the superficiality of the field. I am very interested in nursing, but I know that getting into a nursing program is very difficult.

    I am a male with a 3.69 GPA and I am in several honor societies. However, I do not have any medical experience besides observation (shadowing) and a little red cross volunteer work. I want to enter into the Georgia State University accelerated BSN program after I graduate. On average, they have 600+ applicants for 56 slots each year 2x a year.

    Are there any books that help with the application process, such as how to write a great essay and how to get the best letters of recommendations? I looked on amazon and the closet book I found was "how to get into any PA school."

    Thank you for all of your help and I hope to be a nurse one day!

    I would not even slightly hesitate if I were you; yes it is competitive to get into nursing school; but you should have all of the pre-reqs pretty much completed, so that will boost you. You should apply everywhere, and early. And, although I may get flamed for saying this, in this area (MD), they are very aggressive recruiting male applicants, as there is a drive to bring more men into nursing.
    Your letters of rec should be from teachers, and anything from the red cross may help you. Also, in the meanwhile, start volunteering at a clinic, a hospital, a long term care facility, or even look in becoming a CNA to get some experience. I think that you have every chance of getting accepted-Also, go in and talk to a counselor-we had a great one at my college who worked with students to help them figure what, when and how to get through the application process.

    Best wishes, let us know what happens
  11. by   nursemike
    I agree that CNA experience is a great benefit to nursing students, but I don't know that it will help you get into school. You could cite it in an essay or interview as an example of your commitment to the field--and it would give you a chance to see up close whether it's something you really want to do. But the only preference my school gave for prior experience in healthcare was a small one for LPNs.
    In discussing your business experience, I would play up the managerial side as much as dealing with customers. Even if you were your only employee, you had books to keep and numerous other obligations. Time-management is a big issue for nsg students, and the candidate who has already developed those skills is much better prepared to succeed.
    Good luck.
  12. by   NRSKarenRN
    Welcome!


    Check out our Male Nursing Forum
  13. by   Daytonite
    Quote from PatrickJ
    Nice thing is, we do not have to wear skirts or those little nancy nurse hats anymore.
    You're kidding! When did that change?

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