LVN before RN

  1. Hi Alll

    I have been reading your posts for a long time but this is the first post that I have written. Anyways I am a CNA now and going to school taking nursing pre reqs. I ws wondering if anyone could give me some advice on whether or not to become an LVN before I go to nursing school to get a BSN.
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  2. 15 Comments

  3. by   tylersmom716
    I am a cna and hopefully will be going to school in Jan 2003 for the LPN program. I think it is a good idea to become an LPN first for me because I have a child and it only takes 3 semesters to complete. Therefore, once I become an LPN I can go back to be an RN and work part time as an LPN. Plus, if I decide that I don't like the nursing profession I wouldn't have wasted 2-4 years in school becoming an RN.
  4. by   mark_LD_RN
    I would recommend you get your RN if possible.it all depends on your situation and determination.
  5. by   nurse deb
    I have been an LPN for over 10 years. I wish I would've stayed in school and gone directly into a RN program. I have gotten alot of experience over the past ten years and I'm sure that will help me immensely when I return to get my RN. If you need to work as soon as possible, you may decide to get your LVN/LPN license first, but I reccomend staying in school and getting your RN if possible. I have to return to get my RN and I wish I would've done it many years ago. I have taken my prereqs and plan on attending a one year LPN to RN bridge program here in Missouri.

    Good luck with your decision!
    Deb
  6. by   traumaRUs
    I did the LPN program first, but only because my husband was in the military and I didn't have time to complete the RN program. I did the RN program when we moved. Now...ten years later, I'm going back for my BSN.
  7. by   gambroRN
    I was an LPN for two years when I decided to go back to school for my RN. I think I would do it the same way again - 2 years gives you a good feel for the nursing profession, what your options are, advancement opportunities, etc. At the time I went back to school, they had a LPN-BSN program that was funded by a grant. You had to be recommended for it and meet other criteria, but the benefit was that you also got your BSN and the grant helped defray part of the costs. It was called the Teagle Program and that was at Salem State College in Salem, Massachusetts. Good Luck (ps. I had more time with the patients as an LPN than I do as an RN - too much paperwork!).
  8. by   Q.
    I knew I wanted to be a nurse, and that I wanted to work in specific areas, like labor and delivery, research, teaching... maybe get my MSN - therefore, I went for the RN. Having an RN opens many more doors than with an LPN alone. Also think about the possibility of not being able to do bedside care anymore. With the RN you have more options to still work and earn income without breaking your back. I saw no benefit for me being an LPN or CNA first. I also think that I am a damn good nurse without "climbing the ranks."
  9. by   cna on her way
    I am doing my prereqs now and will hopefully get into theLPN program this coming fall. I want to continue for my RN but at a slower pace. I have two kids and a husband who works odd hours so for now one solid year of nursing school is all I can do. But I do plan to do a bridge over program after a yer or so. I want ot do Pediatric in home cases through Bayada or Pediatric Services of America and they are hiring LPNs everyday at 15.00-17.00 per hour (15 weekdays and 17 weekends). So I can livee with that plus the hours are very flexible.
  10. by   NurseJessica
    Thank you for all the good advice! I think that Im going to right into the BSN program becuase I dont need to be working right away. Thanks agian.
  11. by   NannaNurse
    SuzyK.....Could you please clarify your comment regarding....bedside care and breaking your back? To me, if your a nurse and not doing bedside care or direct patient care then your teaching or in administration and not really practing nursing care??? Am I wrong?
    To me, being a nurse IS all about bedside care. Breaking my back.....yes and I hate it. In fact, my back hurts right now...ha.
    I was just wondering what you meant by your remark.
    Thanks.
  12. by   Q.
    Originally posted by NannaNurse
    SuzyK.....Could you please clarify your comment regarding....bedside care and breaking your back? To me, if your a nurse and not doing bedside care or direct patient care then your teaching or in administration and not really practing nursing care??? Am I wrong?
    To me, being a nurse IS all about bedside care. Breaking my back.....yes and I hate it. In fact, my back hurts right now...ha.
    I was just wondering what you meant by your remark.
    Thanks.
    Absolutely yes you are wrong. If I am not in bedside care, that means I am in any other slew of positions for RNs, such as research, admin, teaching, case management, public health, academia, clinic nursing, telephone triage....to name a few. In my opinion, that IS nursing care, whether it's for patients in a different setting or for our future nurses. Ask many case managers here; they are sure practicing their nursing care but in a different way.

    There are times when bedside care, in a hospital, is too much to bear both physically and emotionally. Having the option to leave that and work in OTHER areas that are NOT physically demanding is the greatest option of having an RN, in my opinion. That is what I meant. There is more to nursing than bedside care.
  13. by   Lausana
    I see you're 18 so I say go all the way now! Might as well go for the RN whether ASN or BSN and it will give you many options for the future. And you won't be going back to complete the RN after you have family or financial committments etc competing for your time!

    Good Luck with school!
  14. by   NannaNurse
    SuzyK.......some of those 'other positions' you mentioned are not just for RN's. I've done Telephone Triage, Public Health, Research, Case Managment and MDS.
    Every aspect of nursing, is indeed nursing. I surely didn't expect a reply to be so defensive.

    Don't you miss the closeness with the patients? Actually I don't think I'm 'wrong'...it's just my opinion. But like I said.....if your not at the bedside or doing direct patient care, your not involved in nursing CARE.....your still nursing, mind you.....just not in a 'personal' way..........to me.

    I'm almost finished with my RN and I will still prefer DIRECT care. I love the administrative part......orientating new nurses....but I just can't seem to tear myself away from the bedside. That is the main reason I became a nurse.

    Have a good day

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