Legal issues with only having one RN on the floor - page 4

by photocodo 5,597 Views | 35 Comments

I already posted this but I wasnt sure what section to include it under so I reposted it here. I am currently a new nurse working on a Telemetry unit in NC. We recently changed to an acuity based scheduling system. It is a... Read More


  1. 1
    True, if anyone wanted to get you for diversion, they could. I wouldn't be signing that waste with you at shift change. You need to call a nurse over to witness EVERY waste that you have, every shift.
    Quote from sapphire18
    Interesting...just pointing
    out though, that if they don't
    witness you drawing it up it's not
    a true waste.
    sapphire18 likes this.
  2. 1
    Quote from sapphire18
    Interesting...just pointing
    out though, that if they don't
    witness you drawing it up it's not
    a true waste.
    No argument from me. I've often pointed out that they've no clue whether it's the Dilaudid or just NS that we're wasting. Diverting from the waste stream would be trivially easy. Again, I think it's just the reality of working at a just-barely-surviving microhospital.
    sapphire18 likes this.
  3. 1
    Quote from morte
    True, if anyone wanted to get you for diversion, they could. I wouldn't be signing that waste with you at shift change. You need to call a nurse over to witness EVERY waste that you have, every shift.
    No, actually they couldn't. They'd simply have no evidence that I was diverting - though obviously I could if I chose.

    If you wouldn't be signing, you wouldn't be working there. That is simply how they do it and have done it for years and years.

    Just one of many compromises faced by people trying to work in terribly under-resourced rural facilities.

    Folks at the bigger facilities don't know how good you have it, sometimes.
    Multicollinearity likes this.
  4. 1
    Need to check institution policy, if they say you are get a break, and you aren't, then they need to pay.
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    Beware that any laws pertaining to staffing, breaks, etc are most likely to be codified under state statutes rather than federal ones so statements on AN must be screened through the state-by-state filter. What is permissible here in California may not be permissible in Washington, for example.

    On occasion, we staff a single nurse up on med/surg, though usually (but not always) with an aid. On the rare occasions that it happens, there is a nurse and a tech in the ER who, depending on their patient load, can help out emergently.

    Overall, however, it's not safe IMO to ever have a solo staff member working without someone within earshot; it certainly shouldn't happen as a matter of policy.
    Last edit by morte on Apr 5, '12 : Reason: typing with one hand
    ♪♫ in my ♥ likes this.
  5. 0
    If you can't account for it, you can certainly be accussed, and how would you prove otherwise? Watch you back.
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    No, actually they couldn't. They'd simply have no evidence that I was diverting - though obviously I could if I chose.

    If you wouldn't be signing, you wouldn't be working there. That is simply how they do it and have done it for years and years.

    Just one of many compromises faced by people trying to work in terribly under-resourced rural facilities.

    Folks at the bigger facilities don't know how good you have it, sometimes.
  6. 2
    A nursing home not far from where I live in rural Texas was shut down for this very reason..that is shut completely down..chains on the door..a for sale sign up front. A nurse was in your situation being the only licensed person. She copied the policy on wastes and high risk drugs, she attached a copy of the schedule to it, and she mailed it to the address posted for residents who have complaints..6 months later..it was closed. If they are staffing this way..there may be all kinds of other foogy-moogy goin on that state inspectors live only for the investigation of..ya get my drift?
    chevyv and sapphire18 like this.


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