language requirement - pg.3 | allnurses

language requirement - page 3

I mean no offense to any particular individual, race, group, or ethnicity. I was just curious how the rest of you feel regarding the language requirement when applying for jobs (i.e. Spanish/English,... Read More

  1. Visit  GM2RN profile page
    0
    Quote from GreyGull
    Previous post:



    What did I miss in your previous post that was "misinterpreted"?

    You imply that non English speaking people are not intelligent if they can not speak English without taking age or any other reasons into consideration. Of course if they aren't intelligent, they are just "refusing". There seems to be no middle ground for you. It is either black or white.

    You can learn one word per day but that does not make you able to communicate in that language. How many have taken a "Spanish for Medical Professionals" and feel they are qualified to interpret or even converse with someone from Spain, Cuba, Mexico or any of the many South American countries.

    I think your comments show how unwilling you are to learn cultural differences or better yet, you refuse to learn cultural differences or to be tolerant of those who speak a different language than you for whatever reason.

    Even if you don't believe EVERY single person is too stupid, I believe you have made your point quite well.

    You need to CAREFULLY re-read my post if you want to know what you misinterpreted. Pay attention to ALL of the words (even the ones with just two and three letters), the sentence structure, and the punctuation. If you do that and still don't get it, then any further explanation from me is futile. If you do get it, then further explanation is unnecessary.
  2. Visit  GreyGull profile page
    0
    Quote from GM2RN
    You need to CAREFULLY re-read my post if you want to know what you misinterpreted. Pay attention to ALL of the words (even the ones with just two and three letters), the sentence structure, and the punctuation. If you do that and still don't get it, then any further explanation from me is futile. If you do get it, then further explanation is unnecessary.
    Is this your way of insulting me?

    As I already stated, English is my second language. So yes, please explain what I have misinterpreted.

    For someone to state it is "bullcrap" if an 80 y/o who was brought to this country for reasons other than pleasure to not be fluent in English is a little absurd.
  3. Visit  GM2RN profile page
    0
    Quote from GreyGull
    Is this your way of insulting me?

    As I already stated, English is my second language. So yes, please explain what I have misinterpreted.

    For someone to state it is "bullcrap" if an 80 y/o who was brought to this country for reasons other than pleasure to not be fluent in English is a little absurd.

    And you are still putting words into my mouth.

    This is my way of saying that you, like many others do, have chosen to focus on key words of a post and take them out of context, while ignoring the intent, and have built your own scenario based on what you FEEL that was said, rather than trying to understand what was actually said.
  4. Visit  mazy profile page
    4
    I didn't know that there were so many jobs requiring people to speak a foreign language. I live in an area that has a large Spanish-speaking population and almost all the jobs I've seen only say Spanish is a plus.

    Only a few, those that deal specifically with a Spanish-speaking population require it, and usually it's not a must, it is a very strongly recommended note that you will be expected to learn this language quickly if you take the job.

    I have been a medical interpreter for years, but I do it freelance, and I don't see that it has given me much of an edge in terms of the nursing jobs I really want. Usually they want the best nurse and if you are neck in neck with someone the language skills might give you a little bit of an advantage.

    My experience taking jobs where Spanish is required is that they are so excited about the language that they don't really care about the important skills involved in patient care, and all too often I feel that it is because they know the clientele can't really advocate for themselves so standards are lower.

    But that's just my experience and I have run screaming for the hills from a couple of those jobs.

    I would much rather be hired because of my nursing skills.

    That being said, I once required emergency surgery in a foreign country where not a soul spoke English. I can't imagine how awful it would have been if I didn't speak the language.

    I think that we really do need to provide better language services for non-English speaking patients, whether it be through providing better interpreting services or providing staff with the resources and education to better communicate with paients.
    StarryEyed, RN, PatMac10,RN, kvdlr, and 1 other like this.
  5. Visit  pednursedeb profile page
    1
    Lets be big boys and girls and not insult each other. I did state that I probably would not be learning Spanish. I do understand some and I do depend on our translator service or a medical interpreter for the important things. When possible we try to assign nurses who speak Spanish to Spanish only speaking patients. I had a pt that spoke only Korean the other day and I had no choice but to use the translator phone.
    A lot of Spanish speaking people don't understand the words I do say due to my accent. I think you are always going to have to deal with people of other cultures and languages. You do the best you can.
    I don't think it should be a requirement for employment to speak another language. Preferable in some areas maybe, but not required.
    PatMac10,RN likes this.
  6. Visit  PatMac10,RN profile page
    0
    Quote from BluegrassRN
    So if you walked in to a patient's room to ask if they needed help to the bathroom, you'd call the interpreter for that?

    I'm not getting consent for blood or surgery, or doing discharge instructions without an interpreter, but I'll do a basic assessment, ask if they need water, help to the bathroom, etc. I'm not calling an interpreter every time I walk into a patient's room. And for those who are too hard of hearing to use the phone, the interpreter line is a bust anyway.
    I agree with you.

    At the hospital that I work at. The employee talking to the foreign language patient may converse with them in their language, but when it comes to a consent for some type of procedure it is like you said, I may not translate, unless I am a certified translator.


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