kicked out nrsing school-would u fight? - page 6

Help I was 5 days from finishing my first year nursing and got bounced. i must go on record as not being the most beloved person in the class. the staff in a manner of speaking, hates my guts. i... Read More

  1. by   hotcoffee1
    got your pm email me.

    Quote from moonlite48
    I wrote a few weeks ago with a similar problem. I followed the appeal process with no luck. Just last week I e-mailed the director and asked her for a list of reasons why I failed clinical because I am not clear what they are. The response I received was one sentence,"you have all your papers". I find it amazing that some of you mention in your letters that a student shouldn't know everything. Every question I asked during clinical was answered "you should know that by now". I quit asking because I thought I would flunk out for not knowing, so I looked everything up or asked one of the friendly nurses on the floor so I wouldn't have to ask the instructor. I worked so hard and at 57 yrs old every month counts as far as going to another school, fighting etc. I have a family to support also, and I can't afford a lawyer. Keep us posted. Any answer you find may help me or someone else....I will pray for you.
    Last edit by hotcoffee1 on Jul 10, '04 : Reason: possible unflattering to recipient
  2. by   slo
    You can either get used to that type of behavior or get out now. Nursing school is difficult, then comes the real world which is just the same. Everyone seems to have their own agenda. Your welfare is of no concern. Unless you are quite adept at office politics and/or kissing up, there will be much more of what you now describe. I found that functioning as a caring competent nurse is not appreciated as much as being an opinionated, dominating, aggressive delegator. My experience has been that argument is futile. Rational thought is not rewarded. I have changed professions entirely. Perhaps I just never found the right environment. In retrospect, I wish I had bailed in nursing school and persued something else. If the profession means that much to you, by all means--fight back. If it is about the injustice, let it go now. Just my opinion. Good luck.
  3. by   hotcoffee1
    Quote from slo
    You can either get used to that type of behavior or get out now. Nursing school is difficult, then comes the real world which is just the same. Everyone seems to have their own agenda. Your welfare is of no concern. Unless you are quite adept at office politics and/or kissing up, there will be much more of what you now describe. I found that functioning as a caring competent nurse is not appreciated as much as being an opinionated, dominating, aggressive delegator. My experience has been that argument is futile. Rational thought is not rewarded. I have changed professions entirely. Perhaps I just never found the right environment. In retrospect, I wish I had bailed in nursing school and persued something else. If the profession means that much to you, by all means--fight back. If it is about the injustice, let it go now. Just my opinion. Good luck.
    yes, it is about injustice. and for that reason i fight. there are some rights here that have been denied me. hopefully this week will give me a sense of direction. the ball is in their court. I found life as you described it, to exist everywhere. when you get this old, not only do you have a thick skin, head; but also a few tricks up the sleeve. i'll let you know what happens. Thanks for your opinion.
  4. by   po po
    I have mixed feelings. I had a french teacher in middle school who disliked me and treated me unfairly but, hey, that was 7th grade and she was, well, a french teacher.

    Hmmm... to get removed with 5 days left in the 1st year of nursing school and start making conspiracy claims, one begins to wonder. I agree with HYPERSTUDENT, I am always leary of people who claim they have gotten the short end of the stick for "no apparent reason". TYour instructors had a full year to evaluate you. I doubt if the essential tremor is nothing more than the reason they gave to you to justify a decision that was based on a years worth of more intangible things.

    Maybe it's something as simple as personality conflicts, but if that's something that intereferes with your ability to work with others then I would suppose it is a legit reason to remove you from the program. Lord knows nurses have to tolerate and work with all kinds of disagreeable folks under extreme conditions.

    Also, it sounds like you had more than a few issues on your clinical rotation. Did other people have these problems? Were other people put on probation for similar mistakes?

    I would stop pointing a finger at others and sit down and take a long look at yourself. If you still feel nursing is for you and you were wronged then pursue this deal about your rights with the college. I doubt it will change the outcome, even if you were mistreated, because in essence reversing their decision would be an admission of guilt - inviting a lawsuit.


    po po
    Last edit by VickyRN on Jul 12, '04 : Reason: TOS Violation: Advertising
  5. by   HyperRNRachel
    DD found the error and told me to tell the nurse................and god, i forgot (i told the nurse 1.5 hrs later).
    Sounds like you are being a bit sarcastic. An error should be reported immediately, the excuse "I forgot" could be the difference between life and death for some patients. You have definitely minimized your numerous mistakes. My question is this: before meeting your patients, did you look at their charts? Even if you were not aware of how to hang IV's, you should have checked the doctor's orders and MAR before you stepped foot into the patients room. In doing so, you should have caught the mistake. Instead, as you said, your instructor found the mistake... not you. Then it was you, who failed to report the mistake. Such mistakes at our college are enough to get you bounced...and rightfully so!
  6. by   hotcoffee1
    there was no time to really check the chart. and my knowledge to that point was to check the date on the bag; patency of the tube and condition of the site. the only lab we had was how to time the drip. we had this timeline that we HAD to adhere to. we took report from nurses who had nothing to report. I ran to check the vitals were taken. we had to do the assessment. up to this time, i had given one shot. i had no iv experience. i had my first two patients. i was demeaned in post conference the day before for not emptying the foley on time. i had the nurse assistant with me....i thought she was calling the shots (she was from urology) and we ended up emptying the foley late. when i returned from dinner, i couldnt get an o2 sat on the guy. he was a mrsa, i changed and ran out the door to get another o2 sat machine and i couldnt get that to work. the guy was ice cold. i grabbed the assistant and she couldnt get a reading. the guy pulled out his iv and bled all over the place. a third nurse couldnt get his o2 sat. i was a wreck.

    on the last clinical night the instructor was all over me. she and i went into a patients room for the first time to evaluate. she went to one side of the bed and the foley was touching the floor. she blamed me. i realized i was being set up. all night long it was like this. i was so pissed that i wrote down everytime she falsified or embellished an issue. and that paper suddenly disappeared, when it was normally given back to us.

    so that's a little bit that went on. im not going to work in environments like this....im too old. and lame. but i have a right to pursue this, and find my niche. yes, other people made errors. a guy previously on probation for a med error made a med error and nothing happened to him. nothing.

    im learning here kids. it's all personality. mercifully it's school and the handbook says you cant be tossed because of personality. losing my paperwork doesnt look too good for them.......and then there's the problem of changing the first page of the final evaluation when they finally handed it to me. the caliber of integrity is suspect.







    Quote from hyperstudent
    Sounds like you are being a bit sarcastic. An error should be reported immediately, the excuse "I forgot" could be the difference between life and death for some patients. You have definitely minimized your numerous mistakes. My question is this: before meeting your patients, did you look at their charts? Even if you were not aware of how to hang IV's, you should have checked the doctor's orders and MAR before you stepped foot into the patients room. In doing so, you should have caught the mistake. Instead, as you said, your instructor found the mistake... not you. Then it was you, who failed to report the mistake. Such mistakes at our college are enough to get you bounced...and rightfully so!
  7. by   leslie :-D
    hotcoffee,

    although posters here are seemingly playing devil's advocate, i am sure it is because you need to be able to evaluate both sides of the situation; take responsibility in areas you were erroneous but that works both sides/ways. if any of the teachers targeted you, then dang, they need to be accountable also.

    i say as long as you're being honest w/yourself and the situation at hand, then you keep on keepin' on.

    leslie
  8. by   lovinghands
    I graduated from a nursing program, probably like many other posters, that was definitely biased. They played favorites and I wasn't one of theirs but I always remained within my boundaries. Personally I didn't give a damn whether they liked me or not and saw everything as a challenge. It made it rough on me and them but I graduated at the top of my class with my peers' respect and, most importantly, my self-respect intact.

    Do you have a case? If your program is anything like mine, probably. Is it worth the fight? Only you can decide. A previous poster, I believe it was slo, made a good point - nursing is difficult, get used to it. I believe nursing school is only the tip of the iceberg and many times I considered dropping not because the work was too difficult but because I saw the ugly "dark" side of nursing.

    I think the saying, "It's not what you know, it's who you know..." rings very true in nursing. I have seen so-so students climb up the social nursing ladder and be taken under certain instructor and hospital wings. I think this is something to consider as you pursue your fight - will burning this bridge benefit you in the future? Ex: are there instructors who sit on your state BON? are there instructors who could influence your future employment? Keep in mind nursing, like other professions, is about networking - in my small state this is a big deal.

    I guess the biggest question is one that was previously posted - are you doing this because you feel you have been slighted or truly because you want to be a RN? Where do you go if you "win" this battle?

    I send you my best wishes. I hope that you are able to find quick resolution and peace in your decisions. Please keep us posted on your progress.
  9. by   ZinnianWolf
    I don't agree with and am tired of hearing that if there is a conflict between an instructor and a student that it is the student's fault. Some people are hard to work with and go on this power trip and refuse to validate that on occasion the student may know something you don't know. I am speaking from personal experience on this and yes I am one of the "different" ones. I have an instructor now, who for some reason just doesn't like me. I speak up when I don't think something isn't right and have gone to the nursing director to ask for guidance. I have found out from post grads that I am not the only one who has had a problem with her and that she doesn't like people who speak up or who ask to many questions. I have learned to though that if I want to get through this that I have to say that I was wrong even if I was right because I want to graduate. Sometimes you do have to take a back seat just to make it through. Just remember that your goal is to graduate, and that when you do, you will not be one of those who aren't willing to listen to what on of your students might have to say. I think that some instructors forget that just as the students learn from them, they can also learn from their students.
  10. by   mattsmom81
    Most nursing instructors want to graduate intelligent, competent professionals and might try to weed out someone who doesn't fit their idea of this, in theory. I just don't believe there is a conspiracy of instructors...there's just a few bad attitudes in every group and some are on power trips...just like in real life and real nursing.

    Most instructors like to hear themselves talk and appreciate attention...give it to them and they're likely going to work with you. I learned this in kindergarten. Act entitled, force an agenda or expect extra special treatment and guess what...they're not likely to care for you and would probably just as soon you'd leave their class if you're making their job harder for them.. Just like in real life.
  11. by   busykim
    Hot coffee what is going on with your situation?? Please let us know how everything comes out.
  12. by   hotcoffee1
    So I had my informal grievance meeting. the fact that my final evaluation was altered and the paper i used to document the instructors deliberate falsifications totally disappeared. i admitted my errors (not telling the nurse the wrong iv was hung for 1.5 hrs) but i refused to take the blame the patient received the fluid because the instructor (who discovered the error) didnt turn the iv off. i was blamed for not knowing the patient should be on 2L o2; instead of the 3L she was on. (i wasnt doing meds that night, but i should have known--the same goes for the iv hanging 1.5 hrs ((i was mortified that happened))). I was blamed for incorrectly transferring a patient, (the drain hit the ground) but my instructor and a instructor assistant did the assist. kinda sucks.

    the real issue to me was the alteration and missing documents. Even if I won, how could i return to a program where integrity was so lacking? i stood up and said took responsibility what I did wrong. the agenda was to get rid of me. (yes, dear audience, the agenda was to get rid of me). Air bubbles in syringes were never discussed. i received an email saying i was deemed unsafe and thrown out of the program. that's that.

    so now i go on with my life. and it's not going to be nursing. i'm a pathologists assistant since '98. i may return to that. i would like to thank all who responded. (even the devil's advocates). the thread was disturbing to some... i could never present both sides.

    one thing though, this is a new nursing program. and my legacy is the story of how my final evaluation was altered and a critical piece of paper disappeared. having that follow them around forever is worth it. :hatparty:

    god bless

    HC







    Quote from busykim
    Hot coffee what is going on with your situation?? Please let us know how everything comes out.
  13. by   leslie :-D
    hotcoffee,

    personally, i found you quite the character and smiled when i read your posts, giving you the thumbs up all the way through.

    wherever you go, may peace follow.

    leslie

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