Is there a manager working here?

  1. Just read thru the thread "Is it like this everywhere????"

    Great thread!

    Do managers work?

    Is it better for morale for managers to be "soft" or hardliners?

    Mine's a softy who's reply to any complaint brought by one nurse about another is, "That sounds like a personality conflict that would be better resolved by confronting her yourself." Or just a sympathetic nod saying, "yes, it is hard to understand why she acts that way sometimes".

    Never any resolution to anyone's problems or c/o.

    Ignoring doesn't seem to be working for us!
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   fedupnurse
    Ceecel, I know what you mean. We have one who doesn't confront you directly but sics another manager on you. If she likes you she won't reprimand you at all. We have another who is so busy writing up staff from the previous shift that people on her own shift who should be reprimanded are not. Another sits on the phone most of the shift. Another disappears for most of the shift. Another asks your opinion and then tells you that you are wrong! It's a no win!
    So, if I were a manager I would:
    1. Not play favorites with staff I am friendly with.
    2. Not cover up for an incompetent nurse who is my friend
    outside of work.
    3. Make sure the staff are doing their jobs without being a $itch
    about it. It can be done!!
    4. Tell the staff how great they are (if they are) and how
    valuable they are to have on the team.
    5. For staff that aren't great I would do all that I could to help
    them achieve greatness.
    6. Never ever pit one nurse against another.
    7. Listen to their concerns and act on them!
    8. Never answer their questions and concerns by putting the
    onus on them to come up with the answers.
    9. Running interferance for the staff with difficult families,
    doctors, etc.
    10. Have a genuine concern for each staff and acknowledge that
    they, like me, have a life outside the hospital.
    I could go on here forever!
  4. by   catlady
    As a recent nurse manager, I will say, first, that I definitely *worked*.

    As for soft vs. hardliner, I'd say that depends on the situation. There are situations that call for being severe, and others that don't. If there is a nurse you don't like, it's not the manager's job to make you two like each other. I expected my staff to at least try to work it out themselves before I had to step in. Otherwise you're never responsible for your own interactions--just let the manager fix everything. If it affects the safety of a patient, that's different. Then it needs immediate action.

    As for fedupnurse's points, I agree...mostly. I wouldn't put the onus on the staff to come up with all the answers, but I would expect them at least to try to work through problems before dumping them in my lap. I ran interference as much as possible, but again, I think the staff needs to accept some responsibility for the daily issues of the unit. Managers don't have magic answer bags in their desk drawers, and they can get tired of constantly having to put out fires, too.

    I once read an article whose central point has never left me--no one should have a good day unless everyone is having a good day, and no one should have a bad day unless everyone is having a bad day. That's a team.
  5. by   ceecel.dee
    I like your concepts in good managing, and I do know that managing is very hard work (I don't envy you, but am thankful for you)!

    I'm wondering if..... where morale is low..... does it corelate with soft or hardline management technique?
  6. by   LauraRN0501
    I would never in a million years want a managerial position! Too much crap to deal with, stuck between the hospital management and staff, etc. BUT I do feel if one accepts a managerial position, then that person should manage.


    So, in answer to your question, ceecel, I think managers need to adjust to different situations. Some issues we, as adults, need to deal with on our own. When we are unable to find solutions on our own, or are not in a position to do so, then we need a manager that will step in in do the job he/she was hired to do. Sometimes people need a kick in the ass, and sometimes people need to be fired. I hate to see that, but in a pt care setting, some things should just be unacceptable.

    Sorry so long, started venting!

    Laura
  7. by   Jenny P
    Why is it that when there are personality issues with co-workers, people run to the manager to solve them? Aren't we supposed to be grown ups and responsible for our own behavior? I guess I feel that if I'm having "issues" with someone else, I go to that person and try to solve the problems directly.
    However, if the issue involves patient care and safety or unit policies, and I have tried to address it myself and haven't been able to fix it; THEN I will go and ask the manager to be involved.
  8. by   hoolahan
    Exactly JennyP!! I watched as my best friend was a manager, how people would come to her with the pettiest c/o about co-workers... So and so didn't tally up the I&O. This is important enough for you to c/o the manager?? Why not say, "Look, I have gotten report from you every night for a week, and you have not added up your I&O's once. I know it gets busy, and every once in a while I can understand it, but I do not appreciate it when you leave it undone every night. I don't have enough time before the docs round to do my assessments and get the I&O's tally'd from your shift." Nothing works better than peer pressure to get someone to conform. The manager is the manager, not the mommy!! Same goes w c/o people not re-stocking supplies. Most effective way to deal with it is to tell them privately once or twice, then if they are still not doing it, or you fell that person is dumping on you, speak to them in a more public spot, diplomatically, so you have witnesses. If none of that works, THEN you go to the manager.
    Otherwise, I think your list is great fedup!!

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Is there a manager working here?