Is it true that you will know....?

  1. I have talked to many nurses and all say that during NS you will figure out what area most interests you or what dept you will want to work in when finished, but I was wondering if that is really the general consensus. I have so many areas of interest in nursing that I think it will be hard to figure out what I want to do. I am not even in NS yet, but am starting soon. Thanks for the input.
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   MikeyJ
    I know I have fallen in love with pediatrics. Unfortunately, nursing students don't typically rotate in all departments. You usually do a variety of med/surg units (low acuity, high acuity, possible specialty med/surg floors such as neuro, cardiac, ortho...), pediatrics, labor & delivery, IMC and ICU (once again, IMC and ICU departments will differ -- could be MICU, SICU, PICU, NICU, etc...). And some schools will have their students do a "community" rotation, such as school nursing. But those rotations are usually limited to the student shadowing that nurse for one or two days.

    But those definitely do not cover all the areas a nurse is able to work in. So I think most nurses end up working on a general med/surg floor after graduation and get an idea of what they like/dislike. Aside from bedside nursing, there are so many other areas a nurse can work in (both hospital and non-hospital) and I think nurses who are looking for a change usually take those positions.
  4. by   llg
    Not every student "falls in love" with a particular area .... but school does give every student an opportunity to learn more about the profession of nursing and about themselves - their strengths, skills, preferences, weakness, and limitations. Some people are more self-ware than others and can better take advantage of that opportunity than others. Other people aren't very good at assessing themselves (and situations) and are less able to take advantage of the opportunities that school provides.

    It's also possible that your "best fit" may be in an area that is not included in your education. It's also possible that your tastes and talents will change over time, and what appeals to you next year will not be such a good fit for 3 years from now.

    Take it one step at a time. As you go through the various clinical rotations, pay attention to how the different types/specialties/units differ from one another. Imagine yourself working there and make a list of the stresses and frustrations that each would bring along with the joys and other rewards. Really think about the skills needed for to work on that unit and whether or not you are particular talented or interested in thsoe skills. Compare the units to each, etc. Over time, while you may not discover "one true love," but you should be able to narrow the field significantly.
  5. by   pagandeva2000
    My experience tells me that you will not really know; in fact, many nurses seem to get employed at the first place that will hire them.

    It is interesting, because I worked at a hospital as an aide in a clinic setting, and they offered me a paid leave of absence (paid for tuition and books, also), to become an LPN. I 'saw' myself returning to the clinic setting, but assumed that because they invested so much money in me, that they would want to get their dime's worth and place me someplace like med-surg. I also did not try and contact anyone to share what I wanted, because I didn't think it would be fair. Well, it didn't happen; I think that my energy was sent to them because I ended up in the clinic like I imagined after doing a mandatory 6 week stint in med-surg. I was eternally grateful to go back, because the floors are rough!! I sincerely think that I was placed where I need to be. I can't say that I am in love with the job (although I do LOVE nursing), because it is an overcrowded setting where I think the patients are treated like they are at a meat market, however, I really enjoy the patient teaching that I do as well as having weekends and holidays off.
  6. by   SaderNurse05
    There are many jobs in nursing besides the ones you will be exposed to in nursing school. I remember feeling kind of left out as my friends declared their love for peds, OB, etc. Now I have a job that I LOVE (not something many of my old school friends can say) as an Occupational Health Nurse, something we spent maybe 5 minutes in class discussing. Don't worry about what you will do when you graduate now, just learn as much as you can to be prepared when you do find something that you want to do!
  7. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from scastillo1
    I have talked to many nurses and all say that during NS you will figure out what area most interests you or what dept you will want to work in when finished, but I was wondering if that is really the general consensus. I have so many areas of interest in nursing that I think it will be hard to figure out what I want to do. I am not even in NS yet, but am starting soon. Thanks for the input.
    In short, no.

    Some start out before school begins being sure in what area they wish to work. Some know this and end up there, and some know this and change their minds during school.

    Some start out with no clue as to where they might want to work after graduation, and discover their area of interest during school. Some have no clue right up until they begin job interviews. And even then, frankly, a first job might be no more than experience gained and insights into where you might REALLY want to work.

    Honestly, wondering where you'll start your nursing career is probably the least of your worries. You might find yourself pulled to different areas with every semester! And might find yourself pulled in no particular direction. School is for learning what to do when you're in whatever situation you're in, wherever you're in it. And a chance to gain exposure to various areas, but certainly not close to all of them. Time and experience will guide you to where you "should" be

    Good luck!
  8. by   CITCAT
    referrring to thread omg--is 32 dolloars a hour too good to be true? Suggest checking possibly with your state dept of labor or check with nursing assc. of your state every state is different to some degree hope this pieice of advise will assist you.Good luck in your job hunt.

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