Is it ok for an LPN (new grad) to work as a monitor tech in the ED?

  1. I want to go back for my RN and was just thinking how much I would be exposed to there even if I can't do a lot of things. I REALLY want to work in the hospital and as you know there are almost no positions for LPN's there. If this is a bad idea please tell me.... I'm not exactly sure what monitor techs do in the ED (besides the obvious) as we didn't have them in the hospital where we did our clinicals. Thanks in advance
    Last edit by wifeandmomoftwo on Sep 30, '10
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   grandmawrinkle
    You know, I don't think this is an entirely horrible idea but don't think they are going to pay you what you are worth as an LPN. You'll make about what a hospital NA makes -- maybe a tiny bit more. You will get to learn telemetry (really well, I might add), which is something that a typical LPN in a long term facility doesn't know.

    I've known LPNs that have burned out and opted to take positions like that. I actually knew one a few years back that worked as a HUC (she was a really good HUC.) I have also known LPNs that have worked on the IV team starting PIVs and doing phlebotomy.

    In the long run, I don't really think it is going to hurt you when you start looking for RN positions as most places won't take your LPN experience into account when determining your salary anyway. Just be aware that you probably could do better money-wise working in LTC or another type of actual bedside position.
  4. by   megs1813
    Quote from grandmawrinkle
    You know, I don't think this is an entirely horrible idea but don't think they are going to pay you what you are worth as an LPN. You'll make about what a hospital NA makes -- maybe a tiny bit more. You will get to learn telemetry (really well, I might add), which is something that a typical LPN in a long term facility doesn't know.

    I've known LPNs that have burned out and opted to take positions like that. I actually knew one a few years back that worked as a HUC (she was a really good HUC.) I have also known LPNs that have worked on the IV team starting PIVs and doing phlebotomy.

    In the long run, I don't really think it is going to hurt you when you start looking for RN positions as most places won't take your LPN experience into account when determining your salary anyway. Just be aware that you probably could do better money-wise working in LTC or another type of actual bedside position.




    its true what the above says. i found working in a hospital as a tech during nursing school really prepared me for being a RN in a hospital setting. it might help you get a nursing job on your first choice floor having already worked at the facility you might want to stay at when you get your rn. i know in my area, smaller hospitals take lpns, and so do some larger hospital EDs. good luck
  5. by   wifeandmomoftwo
    Thank you for your opinions! I was afraid of that about the pay but I've only applied so we'll see I also wondered if they would allow me to do things like start IV's (after getting certified of course), draw blood, and other things I am qualified to do. It might be a long shot but I've heard so many horror stories about LTC's being understaffed and not offering the proper new grad orientation that I'm leery of them. I don't want to put my license at risk but if the hospital won't pay me enough that I can support myself I won't have much of a choice.
  6. by   caliotter3
    If you can get hired into such a position it should help when you want to move to an RN position, but I have found many times when I apply for similar positions, as soon as they see that I have a nursing license, there goes my application. When it works fine, when they hold the nursing license against you, well, not so fine.
  7. by   nurse2033
    I wouldn't expect to get any nursing experience in that job. You are stuck in a room and you can't leave to "have fun" starting IVs or other things you might want to learn. If you think it is a way to get in the door for that employer, get paid and have benefits then you should do it. But you won't have much contact with other nurses and especially patients. You will learn a ton about heart rhythms and ECG which will be excellent experience if you ever work in critical care. Good luck.
  8. by   JustBeachyNurse
    But know that you would be held to the standard of your license. While a monitor tech is usually an unlicensed individual, you would still be responsible to act within the scope of your state's nurse practice act.

    Some states prohibit practicing "beneath" your level of license. In many states, a LPN cannot work as an aide/tech/PCA/monitor tech. And an RN cannot work as a LPN. You could check with your BON to make certain.

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