Injections--- Who can give them in Texas?

  1. 0
    I am looking for the Texas scope of Nursing for LVNs governing them giving injections. There is some question whether they can adminster injections by orders of a NP and who is legally liable if a mistake is made. Web links would be great since I would need to print it off to submit it to management. Also does anyone know the law for unlicensed (not even CNA) giving injections? IF properly trained by MD or NP and who again would be legally liable for them? (if this is possible in the state of Texas) Web links would be great again. I am needing legals of both and not just opinion to submit to my manager. Thank you!!
  2. 9 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    LPN- licensed practical NURSE. I do not know about Texas in particular, but just about every other state in America allows LPN's to give injections. That was basically the idea of going to nursing school, having pharmacology and medication administration. Further more, why would the NP be responsible if the person is licensed by the state board of nursing to perform this type of procedure?
    So far as untrained personnel giving injections and medication administration, I would like to know the answer myself. They are pretty much phasing out nurses in walk-in clinics locally, and hiring untrained personnel they can train on the job and pay less. I have been told they work under the MD's license.
  4. 0
    Originally posted by lorrie:
    LPN- licensed practical NURSE. I do not know about Texas in particular, but just about every other state in America allows LPN's to give injections. That was basically the idea of going to nursing school, having pharmacology and medication administration. Further more, why would the NP be responsible if the person is licensed by the state board of nursing to perform this type of procedure?
    So far as untrained personnel giving injections and medication administration, I would like to know the answer myself. They are pretty much phasing out nurses in walk-in clinics locally, and hiring untrained personnel they can train on the job and pay less. I have been told they work under the MD's license.
    Do you know this as fact or have you "heard"? You may be referring to medical assistants, who are, in fact, trained to give some medications as delegated by an MD. However, this training does NOT include IVs, intrathecal, etc..
    Frankly, I'm more concerned about some of the functions CNA I / CNA II are allowed to perform.
    just my $0.02.
  5. 0
    know what.
    best place to look for these types of answers is the texas board of nursing. if anyone can give you facts it should be them.
  6. 0
    lorrie is right, you'll have to look up the Texas state board of vocational nursing practice act and read what their scope of practice is (you should be able to find this info by using a search engine), but like she pointed out, LPNs and LVNs (as they're called in CA and TX) give injections in all states.

    As far as who is liable, the nurse giving the injection is always liable for his/her actions because s/he holds a license. The NP, physician, or physician assistant also holds their own license and shares liability and responsibility if they gave an unsafe order.

    I work in a physicians office and am a LVN. We don't employ MAs, but many offices in town do. Most have gone through a 6-9 month program and there is a state exam (but I understand that it isn't required), however, a physician always can hire someone and train that person to do procedures, including IM injections. I am in Calfornia, so can't say for sure if Texas is the same way. You might have luck by searching for medical assistant websites.

    good luck,
    julie
  7. 0
    Here is link for Texas Nursing Laws. http://www.bne.state.tx.us/npatc.htm
  8. 0
    I've worked as an LVN here in Texas for the last 11 years. According to the BVNE the only injection that I am prohibited from administering is IV conscious sedation. However, some facilities have their own policies regarding who may administer different meds.
  9. 0
    The Texas Board of Vocational Nurse Examiners' General Statement on the Scope of Vocational Nurse Practice
    Texas does not have a practice act for vocational nurses. The law which governs vocational nursing in Texas (Occupational Code, Chapter 302) is a title act; therefore, specific nursing interventions and clinical skills relative to licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) are not delineated.

    The patient care responsibilities of vocational nurses should be within the parameters of their educational preparation and their demonstrated abilities. The clinically intensive vocational nursing program prepares entry-level bedside nurses to provide direct nursing care to acutely and chronically ill patients, with predictable health outcomes, in structured health care settings. LVNs may expand their practice through continuing education.

    LVNs and health care employers have a joint responsibility to assure that LVNs practice within the scope of their educational bases and demonstrated abilities. If employers assign LVNs patient care responsibilities that are beyond the basic nursing preparation, the employers should: 1) validate and appropriately document that LVNs are competent to perform the assigned patient care responsibilities, and 2) include the expanded practices in the LVN job description.

    LVNs shall accept patient care assignments with due regard for the safety of the patients and sound health care practices.

    BVNE/Scope (General Statement) Rev. 01/28/92

    Role of the LVN in Intravenous Therapy Inclusive of Venipuncture
    The licensed vocational nurse who is participating in intravenous therapy, has been instructed and has demonstrated competencies in the nursing interventions and clinical skills related to the maintenance of peripheral venous catheters is, in the opinion of the board, acting within the scope of vocational nursing.

    It is the opinion of the board that the LVN shall not perform venipuncture, administration of intravenous fluids, intravenous medications and intravenous push medications until completion of a validation course which includes specific competencies for performance of venipuncture, administration of intravenous fluids, intravenous medications and intravenous push medications, to include patient assessment, monitoring and evaluation.

    Further, it is the opinion of the board that the LVN shall not manage central venous catheters until completion of a validation course which includes specific competencies for central venous catheters, to include patient assessment, monitoring and evaluation.

    All interventions and skills related to both peripheral and central lines must be completed in accordance with the orders of the authorizing physician and within the guidelines of the written policies, procedures and job descriptions approved by the health care employers.

    Adopted June 13, 1995, Rev. September 14, 1999

    Further info at:www.bvne.state.tx.us.

  10. 0
    you can find what you need to know at this site:
    www.bvne.state.tx.us

    I work in a multi-specialty clinic and the ma's are not allowed to give any meds or injections. Only a licensed person can do that.

    Hope this helps

    Sherry
    Kingwood Texas
  11. 0
    Originally posted by sherrybaby:
    you can find what you need to know at this site:
    www.bvne.state.tx.us

    I work in a multi-specialty clinic and the ma's are not allowed to give any meds or injections. Only a licensed person can do that.

    Hope this helps

    Sherry
    Kingwood Texas
    Texas, used to have Medication Aides. Does this job title still exist? The Medication Aide, completed a program in giving medications, and had to pass a state exam, which they had to retake on an ongoing basis to keep their certification. They worked in nursing homes, and could give all meds, except IM, SC, and IV.

    Brownie



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