I wish I'd have known....B4 nursing school - page 5

What is the one thing that you know NOW, but you wish you would have known BEFORE you started nursing school?:uhoh21:... Read More

  1. by   watersnake
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    Lol, Mandy Patinkin, right?

    What was the name of that movie?
    I dig that movie sooo much. Ever see 'Kingpin'?

    We ought to start a thread on that subject.

    How many times in old schlocky 1950s giant insect movies did a doctor say; "I've given her a sedative, she'll sleep now. All we can do is watch and hope."

    Snake
  2. by   Q.
    Quote from talaxandra
    One article I found particularly interesting was Jef Raskin's "Humbug: Nursing Theory" (http://www.jefraskin.com/forjef2/jef...ryForSite.html), and Quakwatch's on-going debate about therapeutic touch (http://www.quackwatch.org/01Quackery...Topics/tt.html) seems convincing to me.
    THis sounds to me like it could be a whole new thread - any takers?
    I'd definitely be up for a whole new thread.

    I also read Jeff Raskin's article and I personally think it's a must-read for every nurse.
  3. by   susanna
    Quote from watersnake
    #3. Diabetes can be identified as cellular dysfunction on biopsy, necropsy, and responds (hopefully) to a given treatment regimen. That is science. A lesion may be only a single dysfunctioning cell, believe it or not. This has been investigated in cardiac electrophysiology with profit.

    Keep your zeal.-----Snake
    Cool, no wonder I never understood the phrase, "Where is the lesion?" when electroneurodiagnostic personnel were talking. I always assumed they were talking about an injury.
  4. by   GracefulRN
    Quote from Susy K
    I'd definitely be up for a whole new thread.

    I also read Jeff Raskin's article and I personally think it's a must-read for every nurse.
    I vote for a new thread too. Very interesting article by Raskin, definately, thought provoking
  5. by   Supercalifragilistic
    Snake,

    RE: Virchow
    I will have to look him up! I know the name, and I think we covered him in my nursing pre-reqs. I just don't remember ever hearing that his was THE ultimate definition of disease and the one we still use as a "litmus test" for defining disease today.

    RE: "Being old doesn't make it wrong, indeed it often gains validity during repeated use."
    I agree with you here and did not mean to imply otherwise. Rather - like you said in talking about runaway slaves - just meant I'm glad we don't still use ALL 19th century definitions and standards anymore!

    RE: Diabetes & lesions
    Interesting! Didn't know single dysfunctioning cells could be called "lesions."

    RE: mental health & the DMS
    I think the issue here is really that we still have a long way to go in understanding psych issues. There's still a lot of research to be done, and we are certainly far from having "all the answers," hence some of the "confusion" and reworking of definitions.

    Personally, I am really intrigued by psych - especially how it overlaps with philosophy, religion, and social mores. I forget who it is here on Allnurses.com, but someone has a signature line that says something like, "when you talk to God, they call it prayer; when God talks to you, they call it schizophrenia." Who's to say, since we don't really know the causes of these things (yet)?

    But just because we don't have the answers yet doesn't mean it's not science. You're right, whether it's "science" has to do with the method/process for determining the answers. So I'm sure some of the reworked definitions are unscientific, but I'm sure others are scientific and change based on new & developing information that must be considered.

    Will have to check out that link posted by Susy K.

    RE: evidence-based nursing
    Probably true that much of it is empirical right now. Again, another area with a long way to go; I think the push for this is relatively new. But there are plenty of studies (regarding nursing practice) that have been done and are being reproduced...time will tell whether or not they hold the same results!

    RE: general skepticism and playing the devil's advocate
    I am right there with you on this one! Firm believer in the saying, "Question Authority!" Makes you a better citizen/nurse/person when you take the info and analyze for yourself whether it is legitimate.
  6. by   Supercalifragilistic
    Sorry to the OP - didn't mean to hijack the thread with such lengthy posts.

    What I wish I'd known/realized before nursing school: That I'm much more interested in nursing theory and health information/education as a career than in bedside nursing as a career!
  7. by   susanna
    Quote from Supercalifragilistic
    Personally, I am really intrigued by psych - especially how it overlaps with philosophy, religion, and social mores. I forget who it is here on Allnurses.com, but someone has a signature line that says something like, "when you talk to God, they call it prayer; when God talks to you, they call it schizophrenia." Who's to say, since we don't really know the causes of these things (yet)?


    RE: general skepticism and playing the devil's advocate
    I am right there with you on this one! Firm believer in the saying, "Question Authority!" Makes you a better citizen/nurse/person when you take the info and analyze for yourself whether it is legitimate.
    You should definately read some Thomas Szasz(sp?) then because thats where the quote came from. The first book I read by him I think was called, "The myth of mental illness" or "The dangers of mental illness" or something like that. He doesn't use tact. Szasz rocks!
  8. by   Supercalifragilistic
    Yep, it's "Szasz" - I remember reading about him too and putting him on my "to-read" list.

    Speaking of reading, just read the Raskin article. Geez - when I said I was interested in "nursing theory" I sure wasn't referring to the same "nursing theory" he was talking about through most of the article!

    Maybe I should have said "nursing research" since what I was referring to was not an overarching "theory of nursing" but rather, investigatons into theories of best practices in nursing care. That's how the term "nursing theory" was used in my nursing school...it wasn't used to refer to a single, all-encompassing theory of nursing. Can you imagine trying to come up with such a theory??? Yikes!!!
  9. by   gypsyatheart
    BACK to the ORIGINAL question!
    I wish I had known that I wouldn't know how to be a nurse or really, anything about nursing 'til I started working...it took that 1st year to really get my feet wet, to learn how to be a nurse. I always say "nursing school prepares you to learn how to be a nurse", it lays your groundwork so to speak. And I worked as a nurse tech, nurse extern for a few yrs before graduating...thought it was gonna be a piece of cake! LOL :chuckle
  10. by   psychomachia
    Quote from moondancer
    BACK to the ORIGINAL question!
    OK...I wish I had known how big my bladder would have to be when I became a nurse...
  11. by   veteranRN
    I wish I would have known how much bedside nursing is actually charting and how little is hands on care. And how much charting I would need to do to CYA.
  12. by   talaxandra
    Okay, new thread started (Is nursing a science? A Discipline?) as nobody else wanted to start it! Edited to add - well, as it turns out not nobody. GracefulRN and I both started threads, which have been combined. Feel free to join us!
    Back to the point of this thread I've come up with a couple of other things:

    I wish I'd known that some of the best friends I would ever have in my life would come through nursing

    I wish I'd known that, whatever the differences between us, if I meet a nurse we instantly have something in common, and discussion material for an entire overnight train trip to Sydney

    I wish I'd known that nursing would allow me to experience emotional highs I never dreamed possible, witness tragedies I never knew could occur, and bless me with the opportunity to make a real difference.

    I wish I'd known that I would discover a gift for teaching

    Most importantly, I wish I'd known that once I became a nurse I would never stop being a nurse - that it would colour pretty much every aspect of my life, from popular culture ("but here's why 'Flatliners' sucks - the whole premise is faulty;" "why is this code on ER being run without a single nurse int eh room?" "forget the fact that he has intranasal O2 connected to a ventilator, why is an unconscious patient flat on his back with the bed rails down and the bed in the high position?!") through personal and political philosophy, to the inevitable pull of shop talk whenever I hook up with another nurse, however much we both vow that is just. won't. happen. this. time!
    Last edit by talaxandra on May 21, '04
  13. by   twarlik
    Quote from talaxandra
    Coming from a hospital-based background, and with my post-grad qualifications in health ethics, most of my contact with nursing theory has been self-directed. Despite my current academic supervisor's strong championing on nursing theory and professionalism, I must confess that I lean more toward Watersnake's position than that of the majority.
    One article I found particularly interesting was Jef Raskin's "Humbug: Nursing Theory" (http://www.jefraskin.com/forjef2/jef...ryForSite.html), and Quakwatch's on-going debate about therapeutic touch (http://www.quackwatch.org/01Quackery...Topics/tt.html) seems convincing to me.
    THis sounds to me like it could be a whole new thread - any takers?
    Great links! Thanks!

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