I had some trouble with a CNA...should I talk to the manager? - page 6

At the hospital I work at, everyone on the nursing staff is on probation for the first 90 days of employment. Then, there are peer evaluations done by the RNs. If the employee shows that they work... Read More

  1. by   angelsarch
    I believe that words hurt as much as or more than being hit....you were beating her with words. Hitting, punching is so so wrong too.

    :typing Angelsarch :spin:
    Last edit by angelsarch on Dec 7, '05
  2. by   katy_kenemy
    this all sounds childish to me. let's face it, CNAs and other lowly jobs (i am a CNA, so i can say that) are people who have not had the opportunities that other people with more socio-economic class have had. therefore their social skills are not the greatest. and it shows. of course, sometimes they are just young, but that comes with poor social skills--- usually--too. i don't think you should say anything to anyone. except maybe the CNA involved, if it bothers you that much.
  3. by   ICRN2008
    In my opinion this is a potential patient safety issue, and I am surprised that more people haven't identified it as such.

    If the CNA does not have enough self control to keep her hands to herself when her feelings are hurt, who's to say she will not become violent with a rude/combative patient? She should be reported to the manager, and if she gets fired it is nobody's fault except her own.

    That being said, the OP should not have made that comment. Creating a positive work environment is everyone's responsibility.
  4. by   ICRN2008
    Quote from anewnurse2005
    Strangely enough I have had something of this same sort happen to me. We have a tech who is well "unmotivated". I ask her to do things such as daily weights and placing compression boots on pts at the beginning of the shift and she will pop off with " I already know, I will get to it". By the end of shift guess who is putting those pumps on and checking the weights, me. I have tried to joke around with her about those things without hurting her feelings and just being sarcastic. It doesn't work. She has pulled my hair numerous times and once got me in a headlock. She is young and is a rough houser to say the least. My breaking point was about 5 am one morning and I requested something simple. She stated "my head hurts" I said "if I had a head like that it would hurt too". Before I knew it she had smacked the fire out of my upper arm, open handed. Before I could say anything, she smacked me again in the same place. Trying to not start a scene I said " Do not hit me again, that hurt like hell". She replied "no it didn't you big baby". I had to go get an IV out of the fridge and place on my arm to help with the pain and the whelps that she had left. I personally do not know what to do about this girl. She sits at the computer most of the shift writing depressing poetry about relationships gone bad. I think this chick has some serious issues and am not really sure if she is safe around pt. I think that even if I said something she may be verbally reprimanded and that she would never help me again, things would get worse. I am a new nurse and have only been working 6 months and need to gain some respect but how?
    This is assault and at the very least needs to be documented and reported to your supervisor. If the situation gets out of hand, you can file a police report. Do you have any witnesses? The only way to gain respect is to stand up for yourself and stop tolerating this abuse. You will be looking out for yourself as well as your patients. Good luck to you.
  5. by   Daytonite
    Quote from anewnurse2005
    We have a tech. . .Before I knew it she had smacked the fire out of my upper arm, open handed. Before I could say anything, she smacked me again in the same place. Trying to not start a scene I said " Do not hit me again, that hurt like hell". She replied "no it didn't you big baby". . .I personally do not know what to do about this girl. She sits at the computer most of the shift writing depressing poetry about relationships gone bad. . .am not really sure if she is safe around pt. I think that even if I said something she may be verbally reprimanded and that she would never help me again, things would get worse. I am a new nurse and have only been working 6 months and need to gain some respect but how?
    Well, you certainly don't get respect by letting people beat you up! I am curious as to why you seem to be acting as if this is something you should endure? Here is what you do about this girl. Sit down today and write up the incidents where she has hit you giving as specific dates as you can. Don't be very concerned with anything you might have said to her that you think instigated her hitting you. Her rights ended where your upper arm began, no matter what you might have said to her. Then, you go in to your manager with this letter in your hand (keep a copy for yourself), sit down and have a pow-wow with her about this girl. Be prepared to answer why you didn't report this before. You do have to explain that, so at least be honest and tell her about your fears of reporting her. Your safety is at stake. If your manager doesn't do anything then you tell her you are going up the chain of command to her manager. You manager has a duty to make sure your workplace is safe. If something isn't done about this girl, you have to keep writing her up and reporting her every time she hits you or refuses to do what you have asked her to do (that's insubordination). Your manager and supervisor are there to help solve these kinds of problems--they can't know about them if you don't say anything!

    I would also let the manager know about her fooling around on the computer--that's a big problem in today's workplaces. I would let your shift manager know what this girl is doing as well. If the supervisor makes an unscheduled visit to the floor and finds this girl on the computer, she can address it right then and there.

    Please help yourself out here before you or a patient are seriously injured. If she is hitting you, someone she knows and works with, what do you think she's doing to patients she doesn't know from adam?
  6. by   LoriAlabamaRN
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    I'm well aware we're hearing one side of the story, and i commented on what's presented.

    The "welcoming behavior" is not an invition for a slap, no matter how tempting it is.

    I am not defending the nurse's words or attitude, either.
    I totally agree. Although certainly there are situations where you might think in your mind "thwap" you never actually do it- and if you do you face the consequences.

    When I was a CNA (going through nursing school at the time) I had the reverse happen to me. We had a new charge nurse who had gotten her license 20 years prior and never worked as a nurse. She had kept up her CEUs and everything. Needless to say, she was WAY over her head at an acute care hospital. Anyhow, one of my jobs was to set up a room for a patient when the ER or OR was sending us someone. One morning, when she was totally overwhelmed (as usual), she came running over to me and said "We're getting a patient in 20 minutes! Set a room up now!" Well, we set the room up differently depending on the patient and I asked what kind of patient it was (so I would know if I needed to set up traction, O2, etc). She grabbed me by my upper arms, shook me, and yelled in my face "Just do it!!!" Needless to say, I was in the shift coordinator's office very quickly with a witness. The nurse almost got fired- in fact, I was told that if I was no longer comfortable working with her, SHE would be the one moved. She was also made to go through an additional 3 months probationary period.

    Some things you just don't do. Grabbing, hitting, etc are very basic examples. Noone has the right to physically assault you regardless of what you say. I have had patients say very cruel things to me. What is this CNA goign to do when that happens? Just find a way to explain the bruises and/or skin tears??? I would not want to work with someone who had no impulse control. It isn't safe.
  7. by   LoriAlabamaRN
    Quote from katy_kenemy
    this all sounds childish to me. let's face it, CNAs and other lowly jobs (i am a CNA, so i can say that) are people who have not had the opportunities that other people with more socio-economic class have had. therefore their social skills are not the greatest. and it shows. of course, sometimes they are just young, but that comes with poor social skills--- usually--too. i don't think you should say anything to anyone. except maybe the CNA involved, if it bothers you that much.
    I don't care if you are a CNA or not, this is a VERY offensive post. So we excuse assault because it's just a dumb ole CNA? Please. If you lack the impulse control and intelligence to refrain from hitting your supervisor, you don't need to work around people! The majority of the CNAs I work with are intelligent, warm, caring people. I have never even heard the "I'm just a CNA so I can't control myself" excuse before.
  8. by   nicholrwalker
    Quote from JKCMom
    First, she should not have hit you; that is totally unacceptable for the workplace and should not be tolerated. Whether or not you report her I guess is up to you. But....are you this mean to everybody or just her? Maybe you can also use this as a learning experience; from your own account, it sounds like you totally humiliated her in front of a group of peers. I'll probably get flamed for this, but it's just my

    Iagree, I thought wha you said was very mean...and you just dont know what people are going through. I don't condone her hitting you, but in this day in age of violence I would not randomly humilate people I don't know, for the simple reason you don't know what there reaction would be. I have worked with nurses like you and personally you don't sound like my cup of tea either..but I wouldnt hit you.
  9. by   LoriAlabamaRN
    Quote from nicholrwalker
    Iagree, I thought wha you said was very mean...and you just dont know what people are going through. I don't condone her hitting you, but in this day in age of violence I would not randomly humilate people I don't know, for the simple reason you don't know what there reaction would be. I have worked with nurses like you and personally you don't sound like my cup of tea either..but I wouldnt hit you.
    Exactly. I think it was mean too, and inappropriate. However, to HIT her because of it? Totally unacceptable. As I said, patients can and will say worse things, and a CNA who cannot control her impulses to strike back physically is a danger on the floor.
  10. by   bethin
    Quote from katy_kenemy
    this all sounds childish to me. let's face it, CNAs and other lowly jobs (i am a CNA, so i can say that) are people who have not had the opportunities that other people with more socio-economic class have had. therefore their social skills are not the greatest. and it shows. of course, sometimes they are just young, but that comes with poor social skills--- usually--too. i don't think you should say anything to anyone. except maybe the CNA involved, if it bothers you that much.
    I do not consider my job lowly. I see more of the patient than the nurse does. I am her eyes and ears. I report VS, blood sugars, changes in status, etc. That's alot of responsibility.

    I am by no means rich but that does not mean I am not futhuring my education. Just because you're a nurse does not mean you were raised rich. I'm sure there are plenty of nurses on this site that can attest to that. Plenty have done clinicals full time and work full time because they believe the end result is worth it. I don't qualify for financial aid but do you think that stops me from going to college? Heck no! I haven't had many opportunities in my life but the ones that do come along I take and I don't look back.

    I believe you thank everyone for doing a good job--even the man that cleans out septic tanks. Someone's got to do it and you should be thankful it's not you. Have you ever seen the movie "From Homeless to Harvard"? That girl was living on the streets but still managed to go to an Ivy League school.

    If you say this about yourself and your an aide, I'm not so sure I could trust you. If you think your job is lowly then you probably don't take it too seriously. Please, please don't lump all CNA's in your catagory. We're not all alike.
  11. by   bethin
    Quote from jkaee
    I agree, while there is no excuse for her hitting you, I think you acted a bit immaturely, as well. I know that you were just kidding, but there are some people out there that don't take sarcasm that well, or get it when it's directed towards them. I think that's why your charge nurse said what she did. Now you know that there are people out there that you can't be sarcastic with, and especially in the workplace, you may need to leave the sarcasm at home....or at least until you really get to know the people you are working with.
    You are young, and I can say from past experience that learning how to deal with all types of people was the hardest thing I had to learn when I just graduated. The thing is, she apologized. From your posts it doesn't seem like she's starting anything else with you. Let it go, and learn from it. Are you prepared to possibly ruin someone's life financially because of an incident that you instigated?
    P.S. I want to make it clear that I am in NO way condoning anyone hitting anyone else.

    I agree. You hadn't worked much with this aide before so you didn't know how to take her and she didn't know how to take you. I am sarcastic, it's just my type of sense of humor, but I never get sarcastic around people I don't know too well. The nurses I work with now know me well enough to know when I'm being sarcastic and when I'm not. I know that this aide is on her last 45 days before she shapes up or ships out but still, first impressions count. I absolutely do not condone her hitting you though. No way. That was uncalled for but like I said before, she didn't know how to take you.

    I'm a CNA and sometimes I (or we) tend to feel unappreciated. Sometimes there seems to be a clique among nurses. Maybe that's why your comment struck a cord with her. Maybe she felt that you were purposefully leaving her out because of being an aide.

    REGARDLESS, THERE IS NO EXCUSE FOR HER HITTING YOU.
  12. by   Bipley
    Quote from LoriAlabamaRN
    I don't care if you are a CNA or not, this is a VERY offensive post. So we excuse assault because it's just a dumb ole CNA? Please. If you lack the impulse control and intelligence to refrain from hitting your supervisor, you don't need to work around people! The majority of the CNAs I work with are intelligent, warm, caring people. I have never even heard the "I'm just a CNA so I can't control myself" excuse before.
    That is NOT what Katy wrote. She wrote of poor social skills in some cases. Not anything near an inability to control one's self. She also wrote absolutely nothing in the world about excusing assault.

    Your post is unfair.
  13. by   Bipley
    Quote from bethin
    I agree. You hadn't worked much with this aide before so you didn't know how to take her and she didn't know how to take you. I am sarcastic, it's just my type of sense of humor, but I never get sarcastic around people I don't know too well. The nurses I work with now know me well enough to know when I'm being sarcastic and when I'm not. I know that this aide is on her last 45 days before she shapes up or ships out but still, first impressions count. I absolutely do not condone her hitting you though. No way. That was uncalled for but like I said before, she didn't know how to take you.

    I'm a CNA and sometimes I (or we) tend to feel unappreciated. Sometimes there seems to be a clique among nurses. Maybe that's why your comment struck a cord with her. Maybe she felt that you were purposefully leaving her out because of being an aide.

    REGARDLESS, THERE IS NO EXCUSE FOR HER HITTING YOU.
    I agree with you.

    Personally, I believe both the RN and CNA were equally at fault. Words can hurt just as much as a hit or slap. I don't think one is less "bad" than the other.

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