How to give report?

  1. 0
    I am a GN and now am orienting on midnights (which surprisingly I like lol since I have never worked midnights). I guess I am nervous about a lot of things, but I try not to show it. One area I feel like I am lacking in is report. Usually my preceptors do it, but I try to say comments in between report (so it looks like I am trying). I just get so nervous and frustrated inside because I feel so incompetent. I am still trying to remember what the nurse before us said about the whole patient (which I do write things down), but sometimes I feel like more is said than needed. I guess I want to be more like "here are the facts that are important" and I don't want say stuff that isn't important. So any suggestions / stories of starting out please?

    Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  2. 22 Comments...

  3. 1
    Don't worry about too much. As you gain experience you will start to weed out the unnecessary automatically. Listen to others give report to see what they include and ask questions of your preceptors. That is the only way to learn how it is done at that facility. Best of luck to you in your new job.
    Momma&RN likes this.
  4. 3
    We use a DATAS report format: D - Patient's demographic (name, age, sex, where they come from - LTC or home), A - Assessment/allergies (I go through mine sort of head-to-toe: neurological, respiratory, cardiac, GI, mobility, GU, skin, IV access, diet, pain), T - Tests and test/lab results (if they have been an inpatient for a long time, I go with the most recent and/or pertinent tests), A - Alerts (Are they DNR? Confidential patient? Fall risk?), S - Status/discharge planning. Then at the end you can fill in the little details you might have missed during the rest, but I find that with this, most everything gets included.
  5. 1
    The type of report you give depends alot on the assignments. If a nurse has had the same patients for several days, she may not need to know things that happened a few days ago. Ask the oncoming nurse if they are familiar with the pts you have had, and take it from there. Congrats on the new job and good luck.
    VegetasGRL03RN likes this.
  6. 0
    Im a new grad to. i have been doing reports since nursing school since i was on a one on one preceptor model...so this is probably where i am most comfortable..... What one preceptor in school had me do that really added to that comfort and i do a mini version of it now is set five to 10 minutes aside if you can to formulate your thoughts and 'practice' . The more i do that the more less daunting it is. you also learn by the questions you get what should just be 'standard' in your report. you will get it , dive in there while you have someone to critique you
  7. 0
    Quote from delaRN
    We use a DATAS report format: D - Patient's demographic (name, age, sex, where they come from - LTC or home), A - Assessment/allergies (I go through mine sort of head-to-toe: neurological, respiratory, cardiac, GI, mobility, GU, skin, IV access, diet, pain), T - Tests and test/lab results (if they have been an inpatient for a long time, I go with the most recent and/or pertinent tests), A - Alerts (Are they DNR? Confidential patient? Fall risk?), S - Status/discharge planning. Then at the end you can fill in the little details you might have missed during the rest, but I find that with this, most everything gets included.
    LOL~ now you will all know what a geek i am~ I have been worried about this subject myself, and havent even gotten a job yet. So after reading this post I have made myself a cheat sheat chart to jot which info i will need for report! I sure hope i get a job soon, so i can use it!!!
  8. 0
    Quote from delaRN
    We use a DATAS report format: D - Patient's demographic (name, age, sex, where they come from - LTC or home), A - Assessment/allergies (I go through mine sort of head-to-toe: neurological, respiratory, cardiac, GI, mobility, GU, skin, IV access, diet, pain), T - Tests and test/lab results (if they have been an inpatient for a long time, I go with the most recent and/or pertinent tests), A - Alerts (Are they DNR? Confidential patient? Fall risk?), S - Status/discharge planning. Then at the end you can fill in the little details you might have missed during the rest, but I find that with this, most everything gets included.
    I really like this. But where do you put history?
  9. 0
    Thank you guys for your input! I am going to see how that DATAS format works for me tonight. I am doing 3 12's in a row startin' today!
  10. 0
    You really will get better as time goes on. When I first started I included every little thing including a lot of unnecessary stuff. I usually gave report to the same two nurses (which one depended on which shift I worked) and they helped me learn how to streamline my report so it's concise but still passes on the important info.
  11. 0
    Also a new nurse. (1 yr) We use something very similar to the datas report format. Ours contains the pt history after the admitting diagnosis. We update it once a shift but keep a copy for our use during the shift as a guide. I write down new info or changes in a different color ink, which helps me remember to pass it along to the next nurse, such as significant change in bloodpressure


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top